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Found this while doing some research on another topic. Figured I would post it here, as it looks like the other similar post lost all of its information. Includes the explanations of function and so on, in English. The photo links are permanent, so it won't go away again.













 

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Thank you! I hadn't seen the text that went with the drawings previously.
Nagant's 1892 patent is for a "triple action" version. The 1895 patent is a single action" version. Nagant would have had to patent the final revolver design in England before any other country as English patent law forbid the issue of a patent for devices already patented in other countries.
I will add the 1892 and 95 patent drawings in the morning.
Joe
 

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Her are drawings from 1892 and 1895. The final reolvers accepted by the Russians are a refinement of the 1892 patent.



Patent drawings for the 1892 version of Nagants gas seal revolver. It was triple action and had no version that was single action only - who'd be crazy enough to want a single action only revolver when double action was available?



Here are the 1895 papers showing the single action only arrangements. I think these are the Belgian patent papers. Does anybody have the rest of them?
These drawings came out of a series of pamphlets published in the 1960s by H.B. Lockhoven.
Joe
 

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Alright, pull the tigger, if you can, hammer goes back and forward and round is fired. Pull hammer back, it stays until trigger pulled and then the round is fired(Da and then SA). What is a triple action?

paul
 

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When you're out of bullets, you throw it at the enemy....:)
 

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"Triple action" is the old term for revolvers that can work both single action and double action. The original revolvers were all single action - you pull the hammer back to battery, pull the trigger and hopefully it goes boom (they were cap and ball).

The original Adams revolvers were double action only and didn't even have a spur on the trigger. You pulled the trigger and the hammer went back and fell to, again hopefully, make it go boom (patent Robert Adams 22 Aug 1851). There was no provision in the mechanism to manually cock the hammer.

The Beaumont Adams was the next improvement - it allowed the manual cocking of the hammer and the double action function as well (patent Lt. Frederick Beaumont 20 Feb 1856).

You can't call the new system Single Action, it does more. You cannot call it Double Action, that term is also taken and it does more than the original Double Action. So Triple Action was the original term adopted for what we now think of as Double action.
Joe
 

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For those who like research,
Nagant's patents about firearms
A copy of these patents can be obtained through :
Office belge de la propriйtй industrielle
North Gate
154, Bd Emile Jacquemin
1200 Bruxelles
(Copies service tel. number : 02/2064149 - 50 - 51)
No 25924 - July 13, 1869 (invention) : striker lever and striker stop for Remington rolling- block system.
No 26970 - January 26, 1870 (invention) : with Mr. Bachmann, a in-house shooting appliance.
No 27667 - May 31, 1870 (invention) : adaptation of the rolling-block system to double- barrelled shotguns.
No 29046 - July 17, 1871 (improvement) : new improved extractor for the rolling-block system.
No 31225 - September 19, 1872 (improvement) : fitting of the new extractor and striker lever to double-barrelled shotguns.
No 33765 - December 19, 1873 (invention) : fitting of the Remington-Nagant system to firearms of all calibers.
No 39340 - April 14, 1876 (invention) : single trigger for double-barrelled shotguns.
No 39512 - May 9, 1876 (invention) : fast loading for a rolling-block rifle.
No 41590 - February 27, 1877 (invention) : modification relating to the fast loading design.
No 42456 - June 15, 1877 (improvement) : modification relating to the single trigger design for double-barrelled shotguns.
No 42907 - August 25, 1877 (invention) : revolver model 1878.
No 44563 - March 14, 1878 (improvement) : modification regarding the model 1878.
No 44954 - April 24, 1878 (improvement) : new ejector rod for the model 1878.
No 46620 - November 14, 1878 (improvement) : removable trigger guard for rifles.
No 50871 - March 17, 1880 (improvement) : adaptation of the revolver model 1878 for the single-action mode.
No 51269 - April 24, 1880 (improvement) : bayonet holder.
No 59517 - November 8, 1882 (improvement) : modification about the fast loading rifle.
No 61151 - April 19, 1883 (improvement) : another modification for the fast loading rifle.
No 61794 - June 23, 1883 (invention) : Comblain rifle accessories.
No 63999 - January 30, 1884 (improvement) : another modification for the fast loading rifle.
No 79324 - October 26, 1887 (invention) : Nagant rifle fitted with an horizontaly moving bolt.
No 83431 - September 29, 1888 (improvement) : modification regarding the Nagant rifle.
No 84016 - November 21, 1888 (improvement) : modification regarding the Comblain rifle.
No 84225 - December 10, 1888 (improvement) : new loading clip for the Nagant rifle.
No 84779 - January 26, 1889 (invention) : new steel hardening process.
No 87203 - July 30, 1889 (invention) : Nagant rifle with a Mauser type bolt (Mosin-Nagant).
No 87874 - September 28, 1889 (improvement) : New safety for the Nagant rifles.
No 93345 - January 6, 1891 (improvement) : modification regarding the Mosin-Nagant rifle.
No 95370 - June 22, 1891 (improvement) : modification regarding the Mosin-Nagant rifle.
No 98446 - February 18, 1892 (invention) : Comblain rifle accessories.
No 99113 - April 5, 1892 (invention) : Details about the "gas seal" revolver.
No 99346 - April 14, 1892 (invention) : transformation of the Berdan rifle.
No 107902 - December 20, 1893 (improvement) : new loading clip for the Mosin-Nagant rifle.
No 116198 - June 17, 1895 (improvement) : final drawing of the "gas seal" revolver.
 
 
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