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What caliber, and is it a gas seal revolver? She's a nice one. Is that an original finish (since it's not military it's possible the civillian ordered it in nickel?
 

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During the Boer War, the Orange Vree Stat (Orange Free State) used solid frame Webley revolvers purchased prior to the start of hostilities. Photographs of OVS officers indicate they used large Webley and Colt revolvers of .45 to .476 caliber. No indication of any little 9mm or 7.5mm Nagants in service down there - "though anything is possible." The Boers were first and formost riflemen who used Enfield and Mauser rifles. They needed modern rifles and ammo, handguns were a low priority.

If the Belgian military contract Nagant in the image was ever in Germany in the late 1890's, it would have had to have a German proof mark consisting of two German crowns over the letter U.

The nickle plate is more recent, most likely post WWII by some former GI who wanted to make his souvenier look nice. If the nickle plate can be stripped off it would help increase the value alot more than any South African Boer War story ever will.
 

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I have seen (and fired) a few Webleys when I lived there, but never anything Russian. But I supposed they used anything they could find. Rumor had it that there were rifles buried on my grandfathers farm, wish I could go back 30 years and take a metal detector with me!
 

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There wouldn't be anything Russian about this one, anyway. What caliber is it, Wilbajo? Anyone know what model it is?
 

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Model 1878 (in 9.4 mm Nagant if I remember correctly).
Joe
 

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9mm or 7.5mm Nagants
There were a 10+mm and maybe 11+mm Nagants, the originals were made for South America (Brazil and maybe someone else), but they could also sell same models commercially. So to find 0.40+ Nagant revolver in area where 0.40+ revolvers were popular would not surprise me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
From 1891 was started to mark all weapons for foreing country's with the crowned V.
This period was véry short, because Germany was started to unite as one big nation.
The crowned V is the first unique mark for all export weapens arriving in Germany.
As enemy of Britain they bouth everywere in Europe Weapons to deliver at the Boers.
 

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Story time

I have been around long enough to know that as long as there have been militaria and antique gun dealers there have been stories told to go with the goods. These fables help dealers sell things. The honest dealers only repeat the stories told them by the people who sold them the goods.

And so at this point in my life, the only history I pay attention to is that which can stand up to vigerous research.

The story with your Nagant is a stretch of the imagination. Yes, the story you were told COULD be true. MAYBE it was purchased from someone in South Africa (did you ever think that a South African WWI or WWII vet might have brought it home?). Now, think this through, if your story Could be true, it COULD also be true that one of my old Russian Nagants was the property of Czar Nicholas II or maybe it was used to shoot Rasputin. Who could prove me wrong if I made up such a story? Anyone who paid a premium price for the gun because of the story would have good reason to claim the Czar or Rasputin story was absolutely true.

(OFF TOPIC: Which fiction would be the most cool; 1. that the Nagant was owned by the Czar or 2. that it was used to shoot Rasputin?)
 

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From 1891 was started to mark all weapons for foreing country's with the crowned V. This period was véry short, because Germany was started to unite as one big nation. The crowned V is the first unique mark for all export weapens arriving in Germany. As enemy of Britain they bouth everywere in Europe Weapons to deliver at the Boers.
Germany was NOT the enemy of Britain at this time - in fact Kaiser Wilhelm II was Queen Victoria's grandson, her daughter's own child. Victorias husband was Albert, Prince of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, and until the time of WW1, inter-marriage of ghreat German families and the British royalty was common-place. Queen Mary, wife of George V, was formerly Princess Mary of Teck - a principality in the Kingdom of Württemberg, At this time most of German royalty and British royalty were inextricably mixed up - a fact that remains with us today.

tac
 

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During the Boer War the Russians were on the British side. My wife's great grandfather was a doctor in the Russian army who served in the Boer War.

In the years before WWI he carried a privately owned Nagant (don't know the model) for protection when making house calls in the bad parts of St. Petersburg.

About 2 years ago my wife's family found his service records online verifying Boer War service.

This doesn't have anything to do with the pistol pictured above, but does touch on Nagants and the Boer War.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I think that it is possible I made bad translation, I have poor knowlodige of English ,
most important, I have it in my hand!
 

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Nagant is a design not a manufacturer. They were made in several countries and in several calibers. The word 'Brevet' on the frame means license, as in a licensed copy, and appears on some Belgian pistols so the pistol probably was made in Belgium. As an aside, some Colt 1851 Navy percussion revolvers were made in Belgium under license and have the word 'Brevet' stamped on the barrel. I think the star F marks on the barrel and frame are Belgian inspection marks. Look on the cylinder face for an oval with the letters ELG and a star inside for confirmation of Belgian manufacture. I can't make out the symbol on the cylinder so I can't look it up in my reference book.
 

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Nagant is a design not a manufacturer. They were made in several countries and in several calibers. The word 'Brevet' on the frame means license, as in a licensed copy, and appears on some Belgian pistols so the pistol probably was made in Belgium. As an aside, some Colt 1851 Navy percussion revolvers were made in Belgium under license and have the word 'Brevet' stamped on the barrel. I think the star F marks on the barrel and frame are Belgian inspection marks. Look on the cylinder face for an oval with the letters ELG and a star inside for confirmation of Belgian manufacture. I can't make out the symbol on the cylinder so I can't look it up in my reference book.
Actually, not right. Nagant is definitely a manufacturer. “Arms Factory of Emil and Leon Nagant” (Fabrique d’Armes Emile and Leon Nagant) was located at Quai of Ourthe, 41 in Liege. However, by 1896 Emil Nagant had become practically blind and withdrew from the business. On 28 April 1896 the factory became the “Arms Factory Leon Nagant” (Fabrique d’Armes Leon Nagant”). Nagant designs were made under licence and copied all over the world. The company was liquidated in 1931.

Most of the interface with the Russian government for both the magazine of the MN91 rifle and the M1895 revolver was carried out by Leon Nagant.
Joe
 

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I looked in Pistols of the World. It lists a cal. 9.4 mm Nagant, Belgian M1878, made by Fabrique d'Armes Em. et L. Nagant. The pistol in Wilbajo's photo's matches the description. The book doesn't have a picture of the M1878. But Zhuk's Encycolpedia of Handguns does and calls it a Nagant army officers Model 1878.
 
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