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Discussion Starter #1
Wanted to know if anyone could tell me what some of these marks might mean? I picked up this N.E.W. this weekend..I am looking at the marks on the buttstock especially...also I noticed no sling slots....but it looks like maybe some kind of sling attachment had been screwed into the stock underneath and on the sides mid barrel length.
 

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Double circle we call the stock cartouche. You can find pictures of more clear examples at http://www.mosinnagant.net and http://www.7.62x54r.net . Hard to say who might have put the stock number on it, or the individual letter marks. I believe the A could possibly be circa WWI Austria-Hungarian or German mark, but again, hard to say. The big thing is that early configuration wood with no sling slots! Rare stock! Before they put sling slots on M91 Infantry rifles, there was a swivel on the mag housing (like on that Remington you showed us!) and a swivel on the front band. Sometimes, a few countries drilled holes like those front & rear & installed thick, bent wire sling hangers. Pics of those on, I think, both the above websites as well. It'll be interesting to see if there are any markings on the metal with clues to where that Westinghouse has been. You are on a bit of a roll, congrats!
 

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Your Westinghouse is not in a Westinghouse stock. It appears that it is sitting in a very early model of MN rifle stock, pre -1908, as it doesn't have any sling escutcheons in either the forestock or the buttstock. A Real NEW stock would of course have all the slots.
This isn't a bad thing, at all, actually, this could be a fairly valuable stock all by itself.
Take off the barrelled receiver and check to see if there is evidence of a cleaning rod nut at one time about halfway up the stock channel --and take a quick look at the exterior cleaning rod channel to see if it looks enlarged for the first half back from the front--if it does, you have a Chatellrault vintage very early stock.
If it doesn't have those features, but no slots, it is still a pre-1908 rifle stock with an added crossbolt post 1908.
Looks like all the markings are a combination of older original cartouches, worn down and overstamped by another arsenal or arsenals.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
thanks for all the info.....I really appreciate the knowledge ya'll have and are willing to share......hope one day I will be able to do the same for someone
 

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Mr. Flashy Pants
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Sometimes stocks are dated under the buttplate.

I think the sling slots were later than 1908 myself. Maybe that's when they were adopted, but it took them 5 years to get round receivers in production. ;) I have a Belgian 8mm conversion that began as a 1910 Tula that has no slots in the stock. Now I know that it isn't necessarily the original stock, but there's really no reason why it wouldn't be either. Here's a link to pictures. http://7.62x54r.net/MosinID/MosinRareBlindee.htm
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I will post some more pictures when I get some good ones of the metal marks.....the westinghouse stamp is very very light...I made a negative view of it and could see it more easily....looked like it might have been scrubbed.......when I can get the photos reduced to the proper limits I'll post them
 

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Arrgh! I agree, matey! I don't think the sling slots, handguards and new rear sights appeared overnight in 1908. Certainly Russkies incorporated changes gradually.
Me remember's readin' an autobiographical account of a Russian guards cavalry unit going to the front in 1914 with their armorers working overtime to install and resight their rifles for the new ammunition (the 1908 spitzer), some six years after the adoption of the round. I guess since most Russky soldats only fired their weapon once a year, it took a long time for the older RN ammo to be used up--otherwise, supply officers might've had to walk the plank!
Same with rifles, I'll betcha economic conditions prevented wholesale adoption of changes to the rifles all at once; older stocks and barrel bands, sling swivels and such had to be used up before new parts were placed into production. After all, new parts required changes to machinery and material requirements; retraining workers, cost lots of pieces of eight~!
(Czarina was spending too much treasure chasing ol' Rasputin, no rubles for bread, soup or changes to rifles.)
Arrgh!
 

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Yep, that sure looks like a US Inspector stamp on the knoxform, matey. Scrubbed, too.
That X9 would've had a small eagle head above it, indicating inspection by a US arsenal inspector after the rifle was taken over by the US in WW1. It is similar to the inspector marks found on other commercially-manufactured items taken into US inventory in WW1--for example the inspector stamps on Remington 1913 and M1917 bayonets.
Typically there would be 4-6 inspector stamps on the knoxform and receiver, after proofing and gauging--this was usually done in arsenals like Benicia, CA. Near the ocean, Benicia, and all Mosins goin' to Siberia for aid to the Czechs were processed thereabouts, before settin' sail.
Matey, I'll be tellin ya, that rifle probably went to Russia via Siberia or somethin' like that, maybe thru Odessa (pirated thru the Red lines to the Kolchaks). And rebuilt six ways of Sunday before you got 'er.
Shiver me timbers! A fine piece o' Mosin history. Load 'er up, give it a broadside! Hoist up the ol' Jolly Roger!
And don't be burning that stock! It was made in 1902. A genuine Imperial Russian pre - 1908 stock worth lots of doubloons. Seriously. Probably by itself worth much more than that rebuilt scrubbed Remington barrelled receiver.

What? It's the black spot! Arrgh.

http://www.talklikeapirate.com/
 

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Mr. Flashy Pants
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US Mosins were delivered to Vladivostok with the intention of giving them to the Czech Legion. However, I don't think they were US military marked. US military issued Mosins went to Archangel with the "Polar Bear" expedition and were left behind. That would be the more likely story on this one. You can find more about it at the main map on this page. http://7.62x54r.net/MosinID/MosinMaps.htm
 

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The way itwas scrubbed looks like my Balkan imported NEW. It should have the remains of an ord bomb on the side of the barrel. As well as one on the left side of the stripper clip guide.
 
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