Gunboards Forums banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,438 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I recently found the circled relic cartridge on a former coastal US Army base that shut down in the 60's. I often find 30-06 relic cases, two of which are pictured with the mystery case. I threw the new 30-06 case into the pic for comparison.

The mystery cartridge has a very thick tapered rim and whatever it was fired from had a large firing pin.

Thoughts? Thank you for your help. Jon

Mysterycartridge1.jpeg Mysterycartridge2.jpeg Mysterycartridge3.jpeg Mysterycartridge4.jpeg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,438 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Just another guess: an artillery primer.
I think you're on to something! The base had all kinds of coastal artillery and god knows what else. A quick interwebz search for "artillery primer"revealed that it is indeed some kind of artillery primer. Thank you very much Mike! I appreciate the help! Jon
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,031 Posts
Interesting
Where, in general, is this coastal base?
I've spent some time looking over the remnants of the defences to the Cape Cod Canal.
It's amazing how many different types of artillery they used, from the big coastal guns all the way down to variants of the 37mm anti-tank guns (in the early days, anyway).
In the panic days of early '42 that duty must have sucked, there was no infrastructure so it must have seemed like eternal field duty.
Made worse, of course, by the fact that "civilization" was visible in the distance.
The big bases with the built in coastal guns were probably OK but the FO posts and the thrown together one or two gun batteries were pretty isolated for the time.
At the north end of the canal there is position for a couple of long tube, long trail 155's, the "Panama" emplacements are still there, as are the earthen shelters for the ammo storage.
All that came later though, initially it was just a flat spot in the sand.
Wonder if that primer was for that type of gun............???
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,031 Posts
One of those '06 relics looks to have a fairly large FP dent in it, as well.
Does it, or is it just the angle of the picture?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,031 Posts
Thanks

By any chance is it on the approach to one of the big harbors?
I've found that the bases from that era are usually sited to provide artillery coverage to the main approaches.

The southern approach to the canal on the cape had defence in depth.
Big guns for long range use, medium guns for closer in targets and small, high velocity, quick firing guns for small boats that tried a coastal approach.
All sited to take advantage of the terrain and the coastal restrictions.

Would have liked to see a practice session for them all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,322 Posts
One of the coastal fortifications had 10" disappearing rifles. They used a counter weight system to raise up the guns into the firing position. Recoil set the rifles down below a paraphet so that they could be reloaded. Only one problem, the local town always complained about broken windows due to the muzzle blast and concussion. Grande Island had two 10" disappearing rifles in their original mounts. Supposedly the Smithonian mueseum was to get them. However they ended up on another coastal artillary installation on the west coast. I saw the ones on Grande Island in Subic Bay in the Philipines when we would have division parties during our Westpac Cruise in '66-'67 a long time ago. Frank
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,031 Posts
If you "Google Earth" Fort Rodman in New Bedford, Ma, you can still see the earthen covered bunkers built for the big guns that were sited there.
I do not know if those were disappearing mounts or standard guns but they were at least 10 inch bore.
Periodically over the years the removal of that bunker has been the subject of debate but, inevitably, the cost is always too high.
No surprise there, just getting the dirt off would be a major undertaking, then there is all that reinforced concrete.
That point that the bunker sit on was an active base until the late 60's (at least) and while the big fixed guns were long gone, the presited gun positions for towed artillery pieces were well maintained, as were the 40's era barracks and officers housing.
That fort was just one of the elements of the defensive plan, the whole approach was lined with guns and observation posts.
Most are nearly impossible to see now, unless you know, more or less, where they were.
Google-Fu returns a rather blank list of sites, mostly the ones that cannot be hidden (like this bunker), the rest are just gone.
I suspect that this I'd due to the fact that any of those locations would be ideal places to site portable anti ship missile launchers, should such be needed in the future.
I suspect that if the OP researched the site in Maine he would find much the same, the few big sites would be well known but all the smaller stuff would be weed grown but still would have usable fields of fire.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top