Gunboards Forums banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What Model? Date manufactured? Caliber? Are there cartridges available.. Does the rifle have Collector value, or is it a wall decoration.

Think I bought the rifle at an Estate Sale about 40 years ago, and it it has been on a wall rifle rack until now.

Thank you,

3843360


3843361


3843370


3843373


3843374


3843375
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Any caliber markings?. Should be on the barrel near the receiver. Frank
No caliber marking. All the markings on the rifle are shown in the pictures.

Tried to locate a schematic.

Numerich's schematic does not match this rifle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,859 Posts
+1 looks like a 1892 Marlin..... I have one aquired around the same time will dig it out and get pics for comparison.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,519 Posts
What's left appears to be a Model 1892 and made before the 1897 ejector change. Parts are scarce but many 1891 parts may be utilized. The serial number means little with these early Marlins for dating purposes.
I like it!
 

·
Gold Bullet Member and Noted Curmudgeon
Joined
·
98,115 Posts
Given missing parts a wall-hanger at the moment, but never the less, of collector value. It is a beauty. Parts likely a bit hard to find.

I show (see Marlin Manufacture Dates (oldguns.net) ) manufacture as 1892. Note that all Marlins used a single serial number series.

If it is .32 Centerfire (or .32 RF), ammo may be a bit hard to find.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
807 Posts
Model should be roll marked on the top of the upper tang.
It should/probably! say 'Model 1892.'
This one looks like the cal 32 version.
(There's a Marlin Model 1892 that was also made in ca; .22RF as well., This one appears to be the 32cal version just judging from the bore dia.)

These would fire either 32 Colt cf cartridges. Or by fliping the firing pin over, the gun would function and fire cal 32RF cartridges (which were quite common at the time.

The gun will not function with cal .32 S&W cartridge as it is a slightly larger in dia brass case.
Some of the rifles have been modified aftermarket to do so however.

The .32 Colt pistol cartridge is not an easy round to locate now either. It is one of the oddities that still hangs on though finding old stocks of factory ammo can be tough and expensive.
There were two loadings, one a 'heeled' bullet where the bullet and brass case were the same dia (like a common .22rf round).
The later edition used an inside lubed bullet and as such the bullet dia was reduced to something like .292 and relied on a hollow base to expand upon firing to fill the .314 bore.

Same idea and two types of loads were used in the .41 Colt cartridge in it's time.

Parts are hard to find but do show up on the net.
The real value of what you have is most likely in the parts that the rifle is right now. There are a lot of valuable orig parts right there and many will cross fit on other Marlin rifles of the era. Just the stocks, butt plate and sights alone are very valuable.

Here's a link to SOLD auction featuring a Marlin 1892 in 32cal.
Excellent pictures and plenty of them to give you a better idea of the rifle in complete form and even some with the side plate removed and the inside parts exposed.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thank you all, for your replies. Sorry to mislead you. The rifle is complete.
The few pictures posted were to seek identification, caliber, and potential value. The rifle is now completely disassembled and every part cleaned and inspected. All the parts are in good condition with virtually no rusting. The wood has a number of shallow scratches. There are several dents in the barrel near the muzzle. The barrel needs more cleaning. It shows dark lands with some pitting. I don't understand how rounds were loaded in the tube. Don't understand how the loading process works. May need help when I assemble all the parts.
I will post any pictures you all request. Will have about 75 pictures of all the parts. After assembly, will post pictures of the complete rifle.
.
 

·
Gold Bullet Member and Noted Curmudgeon
Joined
·
98,115 Posts
Clearly a .32 rather than .22, but that tends to impact finding a buyer (my experience is - the .22s sell quicker) more than value. Looking at Gun Trader's Guide (note that "Guide" part - it ain't gospel), which I happened to have a copy handy, looks like should bring $1000-1250 range from photos and description. BUT what it is really worth is what a willing buyer will give a willing seller in an unforced market. I wouldn't offer without a hands-on inspection, and in my experience, most folks looking at antique arms feel much the same.

Note that yours looks to be an 1892 manufacture date, so first year of production for the 1892 AND a true antique under US law, so may see a premium for that. Good to know it is complete.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thank you, Clyde, you are a big help. I am 85 years old and have decided to dispose of about 90 % of my moderate assortment of mostly old military items acquired over a 75 year period. My Grandsons are assisting me with dealing with the computer and pictures. Primarily, I don't know what guns ,and a broad assortment of stuff is worth. The first rifle I sold was a rare model, old, unfired jewel, and the price received was a disappointment. So my intent is to try to get an idea of values before I place items on auction . If the Marlin is a first year issue, and original, what price would you start it at on an Auction? In what category should the rifle be listed? If Gunboards is the correct place, I will continue to post a number of questions, and pictures with items I don't know much about.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
807 Posts
Glad to hear the gun is complete!
The magazine loads thru the cartridge shaped port on the magazine tube just like most tube feed modern .22's do.
The magazine tube feed system on these early Marlins both .22rf and this .32cal Mod 1897 were a bit different and complicated from the simple two piece inner and outer mag tube assemblys of most others and what we see today.

On the early Marlin, the 2 piece magazine tube doesn't separate or can't separate ,,you can't or shouldn't be able to pull one completely out of the other.
The early Marlin uses an inner magazine tube that stays in place,,never moves. The outer magazine tube is pulled out by unlocking it at the muzzle (pinching the simple latch) and then pulling the outer tube back under the magazine sspring tension until it clears the loading port. At that point the outer tube will/should snap and hold in place in that pulled out position.
The loading port is exposed (your pic),,the mag spring and the follower are compressed back behind the loading port. Now just drop in the loaded rounds into the tube and let them slide down towards the frame .
Just like a 'modern' tube feed 22, when you can't put any more rounds into the port,,the magazine tube is full.

Now give the muzzle end of the still extended outer tube a little tap. It will kick off of it's detent holding it back and the spring tension will push it partially closed. Then by hand push the outer tube the rest of the way down and closed till the latch on the muzzle end of the outer tube snaps closed and holds it shut.

Magazine tube loaded. Now operate the lever open,,then closed. Now the chamber is loaded and the hammer is left at Full Cock ready to fire.

Those magazine tubes of the early style are expensive to find as a separate replacement part, often messed with and damaged.
The .22rf versions were used on the Model 97 lever action and also the early pump .22's (model 20 and 27?). Those will interchange betw 22 rifles though they were made in different lengths 1/2, 3/4 and full magazine.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top