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Hi all, here are my three Moschettos from the recent PW arms import. I might see about picking one more up at some point but we'll see.

From top to bottom:

1894 Brescia with no handguard provision but an updated lever locked bayonet.

1914 Brescia - Updated to the lever lock during the war sometime, later updated and put into an ex-tromboncino stock cut down to Moschetto length, and rebuilt again after the war. The most interesting carbine I have so far.

1916 Brescia with slide tab in good shape.

The question: As you can see in the second picture, the wood on the 1894 has what seems to be a varnish finish that is starting to flake. I'm waiting on my book about Carcanos in the mail so I don't have any sources on what types of finish the stocks should have. Any tips on what's going on with that one and how to maintain and conserve it to keep it from getting worse?
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Andrea Turchi and Alberto Simonelli said the original finish was Boiled Linseed Oil and olio paglierino (yellow straw oil) was used to coat them down as well. Now over the years these were in service they could have applied a varnish on them to help preserve the stocks, it could have been any type of varnish they had on hand at the time.

Patrick
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Andrea Turchi and Alberto Simonelli said the original finish was Boiled Linseed Oil and olio paglierino (yellow straw oil) was used to coat them down as well. Now over the years these were in service they could have applied a varnish on them to help preserve the stocks, it could have been any type of varnish they had on hand at the time.

Patrick
Thank you! I'm using BLO on the other two so I've got some on hand. I doubt it'll penetrate the varnish on the 1894 but I might as well see since the wood is pretty dry on it.

Thanks again!
 

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Thank you! I'm using BLO on the other two so I've got some on hand. I doubt it'll penetrate the varnish on the 1894 but I might as well see since the wood is pretty dry on it.

Thanks again!
BLO won't penetrate the varnish. You either have to leave alone (which I would do) or strip the varnish, dry, and apply BLO.
 

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I'm definitely leaving the varnish on there so no worries on that.
I like the battle worn character that the finish gives it. In fact, I like the look of all 3. But then again, I tend to like ugly guns, so take my opinion for what it’s worth.
 

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I have been thinking about that gun all day. What to say and be polite and be correct. A milsurp should be left as last issued and we are not supposed to strip the wood. If this gun was mine, I dont know what I would do. I do tend to be a little lazy and cautious. Now I have to admit, that yellow varnish on an 1894 stock does not look right. Polite aside, it just looks wrong. That is probably 127 years old Walnut stock.

The OP is right, leave it alone. But,well ... long term that might bug me to no end. I dont know. Just dont know.

As for conservation, any oil applied will tend to work under the varnish. That wont work. Probably in practical terms it would not matter. A museum would apply Renaissance wax. If serious, that is the only option that I am certain will protect what remains. As much as possible, that is. Varnish does not work well over an oil finish.
 
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