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I have a 1942 Russian ex-sniper that was never drilled for a scope. It has a mark that I have never seen on any other one I have seen. Under the date it has an No 1. I have seen all of them have the No but never have a number beside it. What do you think?
 

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The "1" is just a random barrel shank marking that happened to be near the "No". Is the receiver dated 1942? If receiver appears original to barrel and undrilled, it is known as an "accuracy rifle". For a number of possible reasons, it was never made into a sniper rifle. Good find! Post pics of entire rifle!
 

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I don't recall ever seeing a stamp just like it, but there are many esoteric refurb markings on Mosins, and you just never know what will turn up. Industrial processes tend to have confirmation marks/inspector's marks attached to them, but the meaning of most of these marks from decades ago is probably forever lost to history.

I have a '43 Tula undrilled CH, and it's a great shooter. There's a lot of conjecture about why some Tulas were marked as snipers and never drilled, but I don't think anyone knows conclusively why it happened.

Welcome to the forum.
 

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The receiver is dated 1942 so it's an original receiver. Pics of entire rifle will be up soon.
It's very common for '43 Tulas (both PUs and regular infantry rifles) to be built on Izhevsk receivers, so in a way, even a predated Izhevsk receiver can be "original" to them. I don't know if it's common on '42 Tulas or not, as I really haven't seen many '42s. My '43 CH is built on a '42 Izhevsk receiver.
 

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I don't recall ever seeing a stamp just like it, but there are many esoteric refurb markings on Mosins, and you just never know what will turn up. Industrial processes tend to have confirmation marks/inspector's marks attached to them, but the meaning of most of these marks from decades ago is probably forever lost to history.

I have a '43 Tula undrilled CH, and it's a great shooter. There's a lot of conjecture about why some Tulas were marked as snipers and never drilled, but I don't think anyone knows conclusively why it happened.

Welcome to the forum.
It's not jut post-war refurbs. This one is Finn'ed.
 

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I've seen a 42 Tula, that had the "CH" mark that I also thought was undrilled.
Once I looked at some (for lack of a better term) "speckles" in the metal right where the holes would be drilled for a PU mount I concluded that it had indeed be drillled, then later welded up later at refurb.
I needed good light and a magnifing glass to see it, the rework was so good.
So you might want to take a closer look.
Is the bore in good shape? Perhaps the "1" means it was top notch?
 

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It's not jut post-war refurbs. This one is Finn'ed.
I was referring to the "1", not the CH, although I only recall seeing one other Finned "accuracy rifle Tula". Cool rifle!

I've seen a 42 Tula, that had the "CH" mark that I also thought was undrilled.
Once I looked at some (for lack of a better term) "speckles" in the metal right where the holes would be drilled for a PU mount I concluded that it had indeed be drillled, then later welded up later at refurb.
I needed good light and a magnifing glass to see it, the rework was so good.
So you might want to take a closer look.
Is the bore in good shape? Perhaps the "1" means it was top notch?
Did the rifle you mentioned not show bolt holes/ends on the inside of the receiver? Tula, unlike Izhevsk, used blind holes for locator pins, but they used through holes for the mounting bolts.
 

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These undrilled rifles with the sniper mark are what we sometimes call "accuracy rifles" for lack of a better term. No one knows why they were not mounted with scopes, but they seem to be very accurate and generally in excellent condition.

I have two undrilled 42 Tulas with the "CH" mark.

Lots of ideas on what they could be, completion target rifles for military competitions, samples for Tula to set aside from batches, rifles for issue to squad marksman who were not snipers? Who knows. They are certainly not rejects as those ofus who own them have found them as accurate as the best scoped snipers.
 

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Did the rifle you mentioned not show bolt holes/ends on the inside of the receiver? Tula, unlike Izhevsk, used blind holes for locator pins, but they used through holes for the mounting bolts.[/QUOTE]Sorry for the delay, lost track of the thread.On the outside of the reciever back by the slot for the stripper clip, there was a small verticle dimple in the metal, as though the weld had been sanded smooth a bit too deep.The inside of the reciever the holes had been welded shut too. The metal was slightly discolored and there were "micro-pits" like little gas bubbles in the metal on the bolt race.One, back by the slot for the stripper clip, and the other area was up front around the angled "bullet ramp".It was so well done that if one did not know what the "CH" above the Tula star meant, you'd never know that it wasn't an ordinary refurbed Mosin.Hope I answered your question.
 
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