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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I just bought this Ross yesterday. I've been looking for one to round off my US and US used small arms collection. This Ross along with a Reminton 91/30 I have that also has US proofs, are US issued guns as well.
I think this is a MkII* but I'm not sure. I would appreciate if anyone could tell me if so and/or explain the difference between the II*, II**, II***. The stock is dated 1907.
I load for .303 and would like to shoot this but I heard that the chambers have been reamed out on some with is not good for reloading. How can you tell with out measuring the chamber if this was done on this rifle? The bore is excellent.
The leather sling has been on it for a long time and it is maker marked and dated 1914 and had the C with the arrow proof stamp.
Can someone tell me the correct steps/procedures for taking it out of the stock?
According to some of the prices I've seen listed by some folks on this forum what they paid, I may have paid a bit too much at $650 for the rifle but I haven't seen one for sale for awhile. Ray
 

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Ross

Beautiful rifle. I just paid more than that for a US marked MK II*** so don't feel bad about the price. I had been wondering what sling the Canadians used on them, and now I know:D ( i put a Kerr nobuckl on mine, apparently correct for the Ross in US service). * indicates changes to pattern: barrel length, sights, etc but i don't have a reference that elaborates as to what each change was.
 

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Very nice. Again, dont feel bad! A MKIII just cost me a bunch! My MK II* is the most accurate military rifle I own. Enjoy it!
 

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Most of the numerous changes to the MKII series revolved around the rear sight and the handguards. You might want to do a chamber casting (Cerrosafe is quick and so easy to use even I can get perfect results) to see if it's been reamed. I haven't gotten around to casting my MKII 5* but it's hard on brass so I'm pretty sure what the results will be. Considering that I don't shoot it much, prefer to shoot my MKIII or MKII Military Target rifles, it's not an issue with me. Sits in the safe, looking pretty.
BTW, I paid $550 for my MKII, in about the same condition as yours, w.o. a sling, about 6-7 years ago so you did just fine. Hell, when you factor in the cost of a 1914 vintage leather, canadian marked sling it's like you paid $600 for the gun.
 

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You can also purchase Cerrosafe from Brownells (they give a nice discount to C&R license holders!). Easy to use. Heat Cerrosafe to around 180 deg F, stuff a rag (I use cleaning patches) in the bore just below the chamber, heat the chamber to around 110-120 ('til it's uncomfortable to touch with a bare hand, I use a heat gun) then pore Cerrosafe into the chamber and let cool for about 20 minutes. Then drive out with a wooden or nylon coated rod (to protect the bore) and you're done. Just don't let the Cerrosafe sit in the chamber too long or it'll be tough to drive out. You can use it over and over. A great tool.
And sigshr, you have a MKIIIB. Tough to find here in the US, despite the fact that quite a few were built. I've got one but it's got an LC marked chamber so I don't bother taking it to the range. Neat sight, very much like that used on the Pattern 14 and the No1 MKV.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
[QUOTE=RayG_Wisconsin;I load for .303 and would like to shoot this but I heard that the chambers have been reamed out on some of them which is not good for reloading. How can you tell with out measuring the chamber if this was done on this rifle? The bore is excellent.

Q: Would fire forming a case tell me if it has been reamed out? If so, what would be a good fire form load and procedure?

[QUOTE: Can someone tell me the correct steps/procedures for taking it out of the stock?

Q:Any suggestions like be careful do this first etc:

Ray
 

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Ray:

This may also be of interest - among its many reprints of old gun catalogs and manuals, Cornell Publications offers several on Ross rifles, including a reproduction of a 1917 reprint of the Canadian Government 1907 Handbook for the Ross Rifle, which covers both the Mark I and Mark II rifles. In addition to a listing of parts and description of the rifle (with diagram) the MKII section of the handbook includes "To strip the Ross Rifle, Mark II", "To strip the bolt", "To assemble the Ross rifle, Mark II" and "To assemble the bolt" .... http://www.cornellpubs.com/Templates/Ross 1907 Handbook.htm

A listing of the various Ross-related items they print ....
http://www.cornellpubs.com/Templates/Historic-A-ROSS.htm

I only have one full military Ross - an original configuration (i.e. unpinned bolt) Mark III, marked to Lord Strathcona's Horse ....











I also have one of the many 'sporterized' Ross rifles (also a MkIII) which I retain as a "parts gun".
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I wish I had the money but the guy I bought my MKII from also had a MK III for sale. Thanks for that publication info.
Anyway I tried form firing a case with 10grs of 2400 powder with paper towel shoved in the case but there was no great expansion of the case and the shoulder stayed the same. Apparently that was not a strong enough load. Anybody recommend a better load as it's too cold to go to the range, 14 degrees with snow, Ray
 

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Not wishing to hijack the thread but I have a Mk.II that is US marked but has no LC on the barrel so I am hoping that it is not modified.
The only thing that stops me from shooting it is that when I was trying to straighten the front sight the barrel came unscrewed and that is when I discovered the locking grubscrew was missing - a replacement has been made but I still need the barrel to be tightened up first.
Collecting Ross rifles in Australia is a bit difficult as there are not many around but over 25 years I have obtained two battered but interesting military examples and half a dozen sporters.
As there are some Canadian collectors here I wondered if they would mind explaining some of the butt markings - I know the serial number system and the CEF means they were sent to England for training purposes but there are lots more - repairs or unit markings?
The Mk.III is also an ex HMS Canada rifle - marked DA-19 - get around a bit these rifles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Well I guess don't have to wonder anymore whether the chamber had been reamed as it has been. Tried 5 grs of Unique and COW with a wad of paper on top to keep it in place. I think the case expanded fully as it seemed to be enough charge to do it this time.
I just neck sized the case using the full length sizing die backed away about 1/2 turn to see if it would do so easly and it did. The case didn't expand a lot in the body it just blew out the shoulder. It's the one on the left after it was neck sized down to about 3/4 of the neck. I don't see any problem in reloading for it. I mostly load light cast bullet loads anyway, Ray
 
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