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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I took the dive and purchased this amazing specimen through a friend of a friend yesterday. This was originally offered to me as a 1905 carbine which I have found mention of before, but once I saw it I identified it as a 1908 engineers rifle/carbine. Paid a lot, but I doubt I will ever get the chance to buy one of these again so I still feel it was worth it. It’s all matching and includes and original sling. Metal finish has turn mostly to brown, but the crest markings are still visible on the receiver. The wire wrapping on the wrist is really well done and intricate. At the shop we all were debating whether it was intended to fix a crack or not, but after looking at it closely I think it was just decorative.

My personal theory is that this was potentially a capture rifle that an Arab tribesman in the Palestinian campaign since most pictures I have seen of these in use are from that theater and the metal work on the wrist reminds me of that region but it’s just a theory. The rifle itself came out of Colorado 50 years ago and that’s as far back os it’s known history goes unfortunately.

Overall I am super excited to get this rifle. I’ve been incredibly lucky in my search for original ottoman rifles over the last year and have somehow managed to acquire examples of many of them. I’ll be on the lookout now for an original 1903 long rifle and a Peabody conversion in the mean time!

Handwriting Cylinder Font Art Material property

Wood Musical instrument Cylinder Tints and shades Brickwork

Air gun Trigger Wood Shotgun Gun barrel
 

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A very rare carbine! You are lucky to find it.
 

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Great find! Is yours the version with a cleaning rod? I was checking out John Sheehan's photos on Ottoman WW1 rifles. Looks like some of these had a cleaning rod and some didn't have a provision for them.

 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Great find! Is yours the version with a cleaning rod? I was checking out John Sheehan's photos on Ottoman WW1 rifles. Looks like some of these had a cleaning rod and some didn't have a provision for them.

Yes mine has the cleaning rod. I was not able to figure out how to remove it though so I’ve just left it for now.
 

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IDENTICAL to my 1908...mine was battle-smashed at the wrist, and roughly replied with Casein or Hoof type Glue, and also the Floorplate engraved with a Field Dentist's Pedal Drill with details of Battle capture.
Is yours a straight bolt handle or curved? Mine is straight and MM.
The cleaning rod is screwed in, and has a slot in the head at the Muzzle guard.
The copper wire may be to strengthen an already initial crack in the Wrist, or it may be purely decorative?

I will try to do some photos of mine for comparison.
Thanks for displaying yours.
I have seen one Turkish Photo of Turkish cavalry with Carbines, but none of Engineers. They were quite numerous in Gallipoli, with all the Turkish Trench lines continuously expanding and changing, especially in front of the ANZAC positions.
Given the propensity of Aussies and Kiwis for gun souvenirs, especially short ones, it is surprising not more have survived!
Doc AV
 

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Great find. Very rare. The only one I have seen in person is in a friends collection in Ohio
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I
IDENTICAL to my 1908...mine was battle-smashed at the wrist, and roughly replied with Casein or Hoof type Glue, and also the Floorplate engraved with a Field Dentist's Pedal Drill with details of Battle capture.
Is yours a straight bolt handle or curved? Mine is straight and MM.
The cleaning rod is screwed in, and has a slot in the head at the Muzzle guard.
The copper wire may be to strengthen an already initial crack in the Wrist, or it may be purely decorative?

I will try to do some photos of mine for comparison.
Thanks for displaying yours.
I have seen one Turkish Photo of Turkish cavalry with Carbines, but none of Engineers. They were quite numerous in Gallipoli, with all the Turkish Trench lines continuously expanding and changing, especially in front of the ANZAC positions.
Given the propensity of Aussies and Kiwis for gun souvenirs, especially short ones, it is surprising not more have survived!
Doc AV
Im looking forward to seeing your photos! My bolt is bent. I have looked at the wrist with a magnifying glass and did not seen a crack extending past the wires so I’m thinking it was decorative but I can not know for sure.
 

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To the man who got me into collecting. You will always be remembered.. RIP DAD DECEMBER 7 2021.
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Hi Nick Great Score! Especially being a gun from Noel P Schots collection. I've been trying to track down his Luxembourg model 1900 for years as I have a model 1900 Luxembourg mauser bayonet that's 1 Serial number off from his gun. And it's only a few more numbers off my gun. Congrats on a great buy! You are having a wonderful year. I will say this it is a gun you can never imagine you would own! I'm fortunate to have my 1908 Enginners examples. Maybe one day the dreaded calvary will come my way. Congrats Nick.

Gage
 

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Do you know why this was done? I’ve seen some references to a 1905 carbine, but no specifics of how they differ from a 1908. Is there actually a 1905 or is this just an example of dual titles for the same rifle?
Maybe collector’s mistaken belief. Turkey only ordered 15000 carbines in 1909. All other orders were labeled as Mod.03 rifle. So probably “M1908” also was wrong?
 

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Hi Nick Great Score! Especially being a gun from Noel P Schots collection. I've been trying to track down his Luxembourg model 1900 for years as I have a model 1900 Luxembourg mauser bayonet that's 1 Serial number off from his gun. And it's only a few more numbers off my gun. Congrats on a great buy! You are having a wonderful year. I will say this it is a gun you can never imagine you would own! I'm fortunate to have my 1908 Enginners examples. Maybe one day the dreaded calvary will come my way. Congrats Nick.

Gage
I am also trying to locate serval carbines that were owned by Noel Schots.
 
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