Gunboards Forums banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, so today I got my hands on my first Mosin. After some extensive research and trying to identify the markings on the body, I have found that is it a 1943 Tula. I just though I would post a couple pics and let you guys have a look at what I have got. The rear sight on this one is for some reason just gone :?

But to make up for the lacking rear sight, I believe that I have all matching serial numbers!:) I have posted pics of the serial numbers of each part below. If theres is a serial number I am missing, please inform me and I will check to see if it matches my 4/4 so far. : )

Warning! Tho photos are not very good quality due my cellphone but I assure you the numbers are all the same.










Sorry if I uploaded these pictures the wrong way, as this is my first post.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,356 Posts
First off, welcome aboard!

The rear sight isn't hard to find. Check the trader board, the board sponsors or gunbroker. Second, this rifle appears to be a refurb (most of them are) and the serial numbers were likely restamped to match the barrel shank when it was refurbished. That's ok, because it's still better than "lined out" or "electropenciled" numbers, from a collector's standpoint.

Also, I can's see from the photo, but does it have sniper proofs (CH above the star)? And, does it have remnants of scope base screws on the inside of the receiver? That would really help make up for the missing sight! :)

Regards,

John
 

·
Gold Bullet member
Joined
·
13,122 Posts
It's possible that the prior owner removed the rear sight leaf in order to install one of the so-called "scout mounts" for a long eye-relief scope. It's not a component that would otherwise normally be removed. Luckily you should be able to find a sight leaf for $10 or so. Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Indeed it does have the the CH and markings from screws on the inside of the receiver, Joop! Thank you for helping me notice that.
What does this mean?

Also, Richard, do you mean during its service life? The store I bought it from said that he had just ordered this shipment in.
 

·
Gold Bullet member
Joined
·
13,122 Posts
Also, Richard, do you mean during its service life? The store I bought it from said that he had just ordered this shipment in.
Every rifle has a standard protocol detailing how the rifle is disassembled for cleaning. Certain components are broken-down into their subassemblies and other are left intact. I'm not aware of any reason why the rear sight assembly would be removed from a Mosin outside of its replacement in the case of damage or possibly for the purpose of an arsenal overhaul/refinishing.

I suppose that a Mosin sans rear sight could have mistakenly found its way into the Russian storage system, but I doubt it. I think your dealer is misinformed or he just wanted to make a sale.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Man! I feel totally awesome now! lol. I'm quite ecstatic over this. lol

Well rear sight or not, I'm glad I know the history of my own 91/30. It is quite something to trace back the history on something such as this.

Thanks guys!

Yea, FIVESHOT, they receive top-of-the-line grooming at all times. lol. Just kidding.
 

·
Gold Bullet member
Joined
·
1,563 Posts
It looks like it's in a post-war stock which would mean its original stock was replaced during its refurb post-war. Does the stock have a stock repair on the top left side at the rear of the receiver? That seems common in ex-sniper stocks. Otherwise the stock you have was a replacement added when the sniper rifle was "ex-snipered".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
It looks like it's in a post-war stock which would mean its original stock was replaced during its refurb post-war. Does the stock have a stock repair on the top left side at the rear of the receiver? That seems common in ex-sniper stocks. Otherwise the stock you have was a replacement added when the sniper rifle was "ex-snipered".
I'm not quite sure what you mean. I know the right side of the shoulder is marked with a box that has an internal line from corner to corner, and the cheek rest is marked with a number 2. Are one of these what you are referring to?
 

·
Gold Bullet member
Joined
·
1,563 Posts
Snipers had their stocks cut to allow the scope mount to attach to the side of the receiver. When these guns were "de-snipered" they usually had their stocks repaired by fitting a small piece of wood into the stock to replace the wood removed when the scope mount was originally fitted. A badly damaged stock might be replaced instead. The box with diagonal line is a proof mark made when the rifle was accepted into service I think after the arsenal work was done. Others are more knowledgeable on this than I. I've just seen a bunch of Mosin-Nagants go through my hands. I haven't made a formal study of it like Vic has.

Look on http://www.mosinnagant.net/ for excellent information about your rifle. You won't find a better source of information on the internet (except maybe here?)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,356 Posts
The box with the diagonal line is a refurb marking. On these refurbished rifles, the chances of them having their original stock is about a bazillion to one. A stock that was on a sniper rifle and that had been inletted for a scope may have that area repaired. However, repairs to the rear of the receiver area are common on a lot of them, even non-snipers. Not all stocks with a repair in this area are "ex-sniper" stocks.
 

·
Gold Bullet member
Joined
·
1,563 Posts
It's curious. I have four Mosin-Nagants that have (I believe) their original stocks. All have broken toes and are in pristine condition with razor-sharp crowns. I suspect they were dropped and broken at the arsenal or factory and set aside for 70 years before being dumped on the US surplus market, and sold by Century for $20 as "UFIXEMs"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The box with the diagonal line is a refurb marking. On these refurbished rifles, the chances of them having their original stock is about a bazillion to one. A stock that was on a sniper rifle and that had been inletted for a scope may have that area repaired. However, repairs to the rear of the receiver area are common on a lot of them, even non-snipers. Not all stocks with a repair in this area are "ex-sniper" stocks.
Well on the inside, I can see remnants of where screws were screwed into the stock and pushed up against the action. Also, there appears to be a little tiny circle on the left side but its barely noticeable unless seen in the right light. Maybe on of the wooden rods?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,356 Posts
I'm not quite sure what you're referring to. Are you talking about the screws in the side of the receiver? For reference, here's a picture of what your rifle would have looked like, when it was a sniper. This is a '43 Tula PU that I restored. The screws cannot be seen, since they are under the mount, attaching the scope base, to the receiver. The mount then fits into the base and is held in place by the lock screw at the rear.



As you can see, the scope mount is not actually screwed into the wood. The section of the stock where the scope base is, has been cut out. When these stocks were refurbished, this area usually had a peice of wood spliced back in, to bring it back to standard configuration. However, the chances that your rifle has it's original stock, or even an ex-sniper stock, are extremely slim.

As for stock toes, I believe many of them had a separate toe splice, starting late in the war and this carried on to post war stocks. This is not generally viewed as a repair, but a method of construction.

Hope that helps,

John
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top