Gunboards Forums banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Gold Bullet Member
Joined
·
1,667 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just picked this up - all matching including the cleaning rod! Stock has been sanded at some point. Some pitting on the barrel at the woodline. I will get it out of the stock and check the rest later.

I'm not that familiar with these - anyone care to school me?


I did notice a number of anchor marking on several parts - marine or navy indication?


















 

·
Gold Bullet member
Joined
·
2,618 Posts
I must confess you're the first collector in this forum that has found the stone as an appropiate stuff to rest the rifle on.
About the anchor markings they are not navy, or else, its the stamp that all the 1909's have and the rifle is from the Argentine Army, why they chose an anchor I dont know-
 

·
Platinum Bullet Member and Certified Curmudgeon
Joined
·
15,941 Posts
Your rifle was one of 102,000 made in 1910 and one of 163,000 total.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
812 Posts
I must confess you're the first collector in this forum that has found the stone as an appropiate stuff to rest the rifle on.
Seriously bro? :barf: It's a battle rifle whose stock has seen a sander. Actually, I think the backdrop provides nice contrast for the picture. Pardon the guy for not laying it on satin.

Hola Hersh, As you know I/we've become quite a bit more knowledgeable since I posted my own discovery a couple years ago on this thread

http://forums.gunboards.com/showthr...9-Pics-to-Review-Please&p=1225305#post1225305

but there is some informative chit-chat, history and links. A fellow turned up on my post with a rifle TWO numbers off from my serial number.
 

·
Platinum Bullet Member and Certified Curmudgeon
Joined
·
15,941 Posts

·
Platinum Bullet Member and Certified Curmudgeon
Joined
·
15,941 Posts
Argentina ordered M1891 Mausers to replace their Remington Rolling Block rifles (M1879 IIRC). M1891 were made in long rifle and cavalry carbine. After Argentina received their M1909s, some cavalry carbines were made into engineer carbines by adding bayonet mounts and a side sling.

M1909 rifles were ordered in long rifle, short rifle (engineer carbine), and cavalry carbine. After WWII Argentina made their own M1909 cavalry carbines.

The book Argentine Mauser Rifles: 1871-1959 will tell you more than you ever wanted to know. A search on bookfinder.com finds prices from $66.39 to $174.94 with $68.43 at amazon.com.

For general Mauser reference, you might also want:
Mauser Military Rifles of the World, fifth edition
Mauser Bolt Rifles (my edition is not the latest)

Regards,
Bill
 

·
Gold Bullet Member
Joined
·
50 Posts
These are sweet shooting rifles. More sock than a 7mm but won't rattle your teeth like an 8. I have one that Francisco Paiz scratched his name on the stock a long time ago. Sometimes wonder what happened to Senor Paiz.....
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
401 Posts
Just picked this up - all matching including the cleaning rod! Stock has been sanded at some point. Some pitting on the barrel at the woodline. I will get it out of the stock and check the rest later.
I'm not that familiar with these - anyone care to school me?
I did notice a number of anchor marking on several parts - marine or navy indication?



nice score. I had a 1909 sporter done by Interarms, bought from an old timer's estate sale, it was one of the nicest Mausers I ever owned. It was heavy and the importer had recut the chamber to 30-06. Other than that it was in MINT CONDITION, bluing and stock were 95% of original sporter condition, or better. The gun needed work to be useful to me, either the chamber wildcatted to 31-06 by opening up the neck area another .001" in the chamber, so it would chamber .311 bullets loaded in a 30-06 case easily, or cut back the threads and rechamber back to 7.65 x 53, or rebarreled altogether. It shot ok as a close range deer gun, but I thought shooting 308 tips from a 311 bore was silly. I did load up a few 31-06 but the tight chamber made the gun kick like hell. I sold it on GB years ago for only $285 and regretted it ever since. I should have kept it. It was not a DWM made gun, but one of the few Argies made by OBERNDORF and it has the early Mauser script on the receiver, pre-banner. The bolt and receiver looked like the day it was made. It locked up like no Mauser I've had before or since, like a bank vault, and when I snapped the trigger dry firing it, my feet would vibrate from the strength of the firing pin spring, and the weight of the cocking piece and heavy firing pin. Those were the pinnacle of Mauser craftsmanship IMHO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,152 Posts
Any other remarks? I don't know anything about these and would love to know more
One of the best shooting and best action models IMHO. I would call this a shooter since it has been sanded and is a little rough. If the barrel is in good shape, you are in for a treat if you try it out. Its semi-collectable --- far too many were cut up so even sanded and a little rough, its still better than many that have been reamed out to the wrong caliber and chopped into a deer rifle. You could not have gotten a chopped up one for much less, so an all matched uncut one for $200 is good, very good. All in all, you did well.
 

·
Platinum Bullet Member
Joined
·
7,597 Posts
Anyone have a tip on how to remove the bayo lug so I can get this sucker out of the stock?
As I live in the desert I was advised not to try and take mine apart as it was likely unnecessary. Those bayonet attachment pins are really tight, apparently.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top