Gunboards Forums banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Submitted for any input in regards to history, details I am not educated enough to catch or suggestions on how to take better care, etc. - I'll post and and edit the photo sizes - it has been a bit since I did any forum picture posting. (Hmmm... struggling with using the thumbnails... it seems to drop in both sizes of image?)
3807646

In my basic level of research at this point, it appears to be a fairly bog standard Tikka M28, with number matched bolt and receiver. It carries the D proof, and any stock marking would have been sanded off before I bought it (the first batch of stuff to come in the 1980's). Import marking is almost illegible, but the first letter appears to be a K (I have a picture if anyone wants to see it). My interpretation of the Civil Guard history is that it started out in the South Ostrobothnian region (which is cool because my family emigrated from what I believe is next district up) and was later assigned to Helsinki.

My largest concern at this point is that the top hand grip has gone from having a hairline split at one end in the late 80's to now having run the length of the piece. I'm looking for a little help as I look at the correct option to replace it with (I'll try and fix the existing one, but it will always be weak). I've seen M28/30 replacement tops and M27 - all of which have a 90 rear end. It appears that making the angle cut to allow for the front end of the rear sight assembly can be done with a moderate degree of wood working talent - is this the way?

I'm aware that I am missing the retaining screw on the forestock hardware - it is sitting next to me a the bench, as the first three turns are stripped, causing it to fall out and run for cover in the carpet. Thanks for any input - especially corrections to my limited base of understanding.

3807661


3807650
3807648

3807652

3807653

3807655

3807657
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
909 Posts
My interpretation of the Civil Guard history is that it started out in the South Ostrobothnian region (which is cool because my family emigrated from what I believe is next district up) and was later assigned to Helsinki.
S 99358 = Lapua Civil Guard. Their flag design has been drawn by Akseli Gallen-Kallela, the famous Finnish painter. The municipality of Lapua is also the home town of Nammo Lapua Oy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,795 Posts
You could do like the British do and cut small slots in the handguard and glue in small pieces of wood. The cuts have to be roughly 90 degrees from the crack. Then file and sand down till the inserts are flush with both the inside and outside of the handguard. Then stain or finish to taste. Tightbond III is probably one of the better glues or use a clear two part epoxy. JB Weld makes a good two part epoxy that is clear. But I'm sure someone will see this and maybe offer a better suggestion. Frank
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
269 Posts
I had a 1903 that had a similar crack that was repaired with a 3 brass rods drilled perpendicular to the crack and sanded flush; kinda like stitching. I think the wood repair mentioned above might look more realistic but also involves a bit more skill.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Ref: the repairs, I think I'll try option 1. You can't see it in the overall picture, but besides all of the amazing finger joinery forward of the magazine, there are 4 very fine insets in the butt, in a contrasting light blonde color. I think I might try something to duplicate the visuals of that work. You can see the 2 obvious ones below, and there are 2 more in the bottom (you can see one of them on the far left). The pair running from the butt plate forward are only on the left side - they don't go through to the right side.
Thanks for the ideas. I've seen that brass rod work before on Enfields and some No-US service Garands, IIRC.
3808032
3808033
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
S 99358 = Lapua Civil Guard. Their flag design has been drawn by Akseli Gallen-Kallela, the famous Finnish painter. The municipality of Lapua is also the home town of Nammo Lapua Oy.
This is very cool - Mangrove - Kauhava, eh? Thank you so much. I was having a bear of a time trying to go through the Guards list (and figure out what/where the old provincial names were) that I found archived after the original site closed. Is there an updated/active link to the Guards list? My family was originally from Merikarvia (South of Sidibi) and the Lapväärtti/Lappfjard neighborhood. Karl Johannson came over in 1885 to the Aberdeen/Cosmopolis area of Washington State, and the next wave was in 1905 (the Ranta side of the family). Loggers, fishermen and wood mill workers. "Charlie" J. lived on a boat on the river and traded with the local Indians - smoking salmon over vine maple and selling it to the guys in the mills.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
Mangrove had posted information on this thread about the Civil Guard use glue and cloth to repair cracked handguards. Some of the info is gone and might be found on his website
New Information Centre for Finnish Firearms and Other Things
I am glad you posted that! I have a handguard in need of some help. the closest thing I could think of and still be wood was the Spanish Cedar used to keep cigars fresh along with some 2 part epoxy. I don't think the cedar wouldn't hold up very long. Fiberglass also came to mind, but it would look as original as a plastic stock.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I went through a number of the links but didn't seen the one in question. I'll go through the rest of them - if it isn't there, does anyone have any recollection of the glue composition? I think this would be the coolest option from a historical point of view, and bet there was a specific mix. I think a lot of the modern ones might not be the best choice for a hot barrel, though I haven't/won't put long strings of rounds through this in a short period.

I think you are right on the Spanish Cedar concerns, Squid. I'll bet you could order a small piece of kiln dried birch from Rockler though. They are where I got the Spanish Cedar for my humidor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
I went through a number of the links but didn't seen the one in question. I'll go through the rest of them - if it isn't there, does anyone have any recollection of the glue composition? I think this would be the coolest option from a historical point of view, and bet there was a specific mix. I think a lot of the modern ones might not be the best choice for a hot barrel, though I haven't/won't put long strings of rounds through this in a short period.

I think you are right on the Spanish Cedar concerns, Squid. I'll bet you could order a small piece of kiln dried birch from Rockler though. They are where I got the Spanish Cedar for my humidor.
I have been thinking of attacking one of my donor stocks (donor stuck is a bubba 91/30 that had the forend cut off with a woodworkers hand plane and seeing if I could make something. Even some thin strips glued diagonally or perpendicular to the crack might work as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
OOOOh boy. Made the mistake of wandering into the idea of finding a bayonet for my rifle. This could get ugly. Anyone got #31295 kicking around their marble floored gun room - maybe ask your butler to check? They cost as much as the rifles!!! Also - looking for a correct sling - is anyone familiar with the examples on Dragoon Militaria?

Thanks in advance - really glad to have wandered over to this forum. My wife - maybe less so :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,838 Posts
I'd attempt to do a repair like the Polish reinforced their Mauser handguards. Cross drill it and glue hardwood dowels through it. Assuming of course they don't hit anything and they can be sanded flush.
Not going to be original looking of course but pretty good for a repair.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,838 Posts
I have been thinking of attacking one of my donor stocks (donor stuck is a bubba 91/30 that had the forend cut off with a woodworkers hand plane and seeing if I could make something. Even some thin strips glued diagonally or perpendicular to the crack might work as well.
If you want to try making something I have two carbine length hand guards (Indian made repros) I was going to try fashioning an M91 handguard from them.
I eventually just bought a handguard and don't need these. If postage doesn't kill me you can have them, just DM me an address if you like
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
OOOOh boy. Made the mistake of wandering into the idea of finding a bayonet for my rifle. This could get ugly. Anyone got #31295 kicking around their marble floored gun room - maybe ask your butler to check? They cost as much as the rifles!!!
Hi you should look bayonet #99358, we used CG number on bayonets, not rifle number.

Regards from Finland
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
My thanks, sir... I actually caught that detail after going into the Bayonet/Blade forum here last night. It would have been just my luck to have someone show up with the other number :)
Notice the new signature...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
A little Range Day action yesterday. Was checking out a recent 7mm Mauser buy (M95 Lowe, sporterized in the 70's at some point... gun fires fine, but the junk scope that came with it is stripped on the elevation :rolleyes:), and brought my Mosin along for a trip outside. Still need to find the nose piece screw replacement, but I wasn't going to be deterred. Enter the M28 Q-Tip. two quick groups to see where is shoots after 30 plus years, one hundred yards, seated, no sand bags. I'll take it - car key was point of aim. Those little tiny red blocks are pretty terrible viewed through old man progessive lenses, so I was literally having to determine the center of page largely by instinct. Next time we'll bring the correct target package.

After that is was solid string of gongs at 200. Yeah, I'm happy with it.
3816209


3816210
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
Nice Job! Good luck on the screw, PITA to finds the Finnish unique screws. I had my M27 apart Saturday for some cleaning. The Nose piece screws must be worth their weight in gold, as they have a funky design and threads. The M28 seems more common.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
I read somewhere here that they should be a British Standard thread from back in the day. I can see having to have it machined o_O
I'm going to work on the split fore this week. I'll start with some 2" × 2" and a basic non synthetic wood as suggested by the folks here :). Going to test drive it on some other wood scraps. Then to find some old cotton cloth from the era... maybe an old handkerchief (I do have some WW2 era Finn bandages I'm willing to sacrifice) if the test is successful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
I read somewhere here that they should be a British Standard thread from back in the day. I can see having to have it machined o_O
I'm going to work on the split fore this week. I'll start with some 2" × 2" and a basic non synthetic wood as suggested by the folks here :). Going to test drive it on some other wood scraps. Then to find some old cotton cloth from the era... maybe an old handkerchief (I do have some WW2 era Finn bandages I'm willing to sacrifice) if the test is successful.
Try looking at some Web sites for old British Motorcycles. Triumph, Norton, and BSA. I know from looking at my 27 they only threaded the tip of the screw that goes through the nose cap, and on the reverse they threaded the bottom of the screw that holds the upper half of the nose cap to the lower. Odd set up, but I am guessing, it seemed like a good idea at the time. Any luck with handguard?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
SK,
The more I read here, the more I'm disinclined to do anything with the original handguard. I'm going to drop $14 on a Sarco or the like and see if I can gin up (more like carve up) a usable top guard (and that screw, of course) for the range. I'm sure there are people shaking their heads at my Enfield shenanigans. The thing I know about brass though - it will look crummy again in my rain forest environment soon...
On the screws, I guess yours (M27) was metric, and 28s had the Brit, as well as early 28/30s, and then back to metric?
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top