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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
May I introduce the newest member of my collection:



It's a Hungarian M48 of 1952 vintage - obviously unissued and 100% matching - except for the bayonet. But all add-ons (bayonet, sling) are genuine Hungarian.

Took it to the range this afternoon and fired around 30 shots as a first test (Sellier & Bellot 180 gr. FMJ).

The good news: rifle is a precise shooter

The bad news: it has an annoying trait - nearly every time from the recoil(?) the magazine floorplate pops open and the cartridges fall out. I think that the floorplate latch is too loose - but I'm not sure. How to fix this problem?
 

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I've found that some latches need to be removed and straightened until they just touch the mag housing, makes them a bit longer with less 'spring'.
You can remove the magazine housing without taking the action out of the stock, just remove the action screws.
If that isn't enough, file a small amount off the latch 'hook'.
Swapping the latch is another possible option, but not likely needed.
 

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Is it a normal M91/30? Not a sniper? It's hard to tell if this rifle is unissued or otherwise. Your pictures don't show it at all. The stock looks been sanded down and refinished. The bayonet shows maybe 20% finish.
 

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View attachment 770874

clayshooter2 ,


Here's a picture of a Hungarian M91/30. I found it online. The stock is original. Look at its fullness and its color.
Sporter:

Both the OP's photos and the image you provided offer little to work with, but the OP's stock looks OK to me. I'm sorry to say that the example you provided as an archetype of the Hungarian Mosin stock doesn't look quite right. Perhaps it's just the photo.
 

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Sporter:

Both the OP's photos and the image you provided offer little to work with, but the OP's stock looks OK to me. I'm sorry to say that the example you provided as an archetype of the Hungarian Mosin stock doesn't look quite right. Perhaps it's just the photo.
The cartuches on the OP's stock are sanded down. The original stock had clearly marked 02 and something else. Also, the stock of the original is fuller and rounded, which are clearly shown in my picture.
 

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The cartuches on the OP's stock are sanded down. The original stock had clearly marked 02 and something else. Also, the stock of the original is fuller and rounded, which are clearly shown in my picture.
Sporter:

I can't tell whether the "02" and the "circle B" cartouches are present and I don't want to argue about it because the photos of the OP's rifle are not good enough for me to be certain. But I will say that I have seen, and own a number of Hungarian Mosins with stocks that look much like what I presume the OP's rifle looks like.

They're a dark, walnut color with an open pore sanded appearance and a light oil finish. And it's exactly the way these rifles and carbines came straight out of the packing crates.

The OP's stock might be sanded or refinished, but from what little I can discern, I'm saying it's not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
The rifle is a true 91/30 - no ex-sniper. It has not been refurbished. According to its condition this rifle most likely went from the factory directly to a depot and had been stored there until being sold as military surplus to a big German importer around 1986 (has the mandatory German proof marks from this year). There one of the bosses took it at once for his personal collection where the rifle stayed until recently when this guy stopped collecting due to his age and sold it to a former employee of his company (now running an own small business as an arms dealer) who in turn sold it to me. It came without bayonet and sling, both I bought from different sources, but both are genuine Hungarian. The bayonet is a little worn and also has rust pittings in some areas, but still in an acceptable condition. I have a better-looking one (also Hungarian), but this fits so tight that it is impossible to mount to the rifle without heavy use of tools. Seems to me that this latter bayonet has also been refurbished, the original serial number has been ground off, a new one stamped in and the whole obviously been re-blued. This re-bluing also seems to have "eliminated" the "02" stampings - they are lacking completely (I did some survey on existing photos of Hungarian 1891/30 bayonets in the net and found that this seems to be not uncommon with bayonets of early manufacture - 1950 and 1951 - whether they were not stamped "02" from the outset or they lost it during refurb, I could not find out).

At the moment I don't have more own photos (will surely come in future), so here a few detail pictures I received from the seller:

 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
And two more photos:



I paid for this gun 249.00 Euros (around 350 US$). Here in Germany they are not as rare as in the US, but also do not pop up that often. But in the moment there are three at the same time in an auction platform - all in good to very good conditions and relatively cheap - prices range from 100 Euros to a little bit below 200 Euros (about US$ 140-280). Okay, two auctions are still running, one for a few hours, the other about 4 days, but one has already been sold for a little less than 150 Euros (about 210 US$). But when they popped up, I had already bought my own one...

Just thoroughly inspected my magazine floorplate latch. It seems that the whole latch stands a little bit too far backwards (in the direction to the butt end), so this small claw at its end does not engage the corresponding slot in the floorplate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
Here some photos of my Hungarian bayonets:

CE5603 - the one on the gun
BI6626 - ex-BF7xx5. This bayonet seems to have been refurbished and stamped with a new number - the old one is in parts still recognizable. No "02" marking - either gone during refurb or never been stamped with (BF is one of the first letter codes used in 1950, BI is from 1951)
Here you see bayonet no. BI6626 (above) and no. CE5603 (below). BI6626 is a little bit shorter, maybe also due to the refurb process (tip reworked?)
BH3352 - I acquired last week, delivery still pending. BH is also a code from 1950 - I'm already curious whether this one sports a "02" stamp or not (the main reason why I bought it - okay, with just 30 Euros it was quite cheap, too - the seller thought it was a Russian one... As soon as I hold the bayonet in hands for inspection, I'll let you know
 

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The m/48 and 52 as well as carbines came in two different stocks. A light grained beech and a darker heavy grained elm. The OP's rifle is of the later elm stocked version and looks totally correct.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
Thanks for all your expert knowledge - really valuable for a newcomer like me.

Just tried to fix my floorplate problem - next time on the range I'll see if I've been successful. On this occasion I did a first dismantling of the gun and inspected most internal details, too. Found a wealth of "02" markings (beneath a lot of others) - even on tiny parts like the floorplate latch or the blade springs in the magazine.

As soon as I find time for it I'll produce a similar "in detail" photo series as I did of my Brazilian Mauser.

BTW - the serial no. prefix "CE" is not listed in Karl-Heinz Wrobel's book on Mosin-Nagant rifles, but if I look at the stamp on the bayonet, it is clearly a "CE" and no badly applied "CB". This topic already popped up here: http://7.62x54r.net/Forums/index.php?topic=11622.40
 

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The Hungarians used 3 woods for their stocks.

Walnut wood: Used from 1950 to 1952

Beech wood: Used from approximately late 1950/early 1951 to the end of production (1953 for the M48 and M44, 1954 for the M52)

Elm wood: Used sporadically during all the production / introduced along the beech wood.


You are right; "CE" is another prefix from 1951.

Nice bayonets and nice rifle.

I plan to make a specific thread on the evolution of the hungarian Mosin in the near future. I have to shoot some detailed pictures of my Hungarian Mosins..
 
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