Gunboards Forums banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
383 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I ordered my first Mauser from Allan's Armory and it should arrive on Friday. It is a Turkish Mauser T38. I will post some pics as soon as I get the rifle. My question, as a Mauser newbie, concerns some ammo that I purchased recently. It is supposed to be Romanian and I have included some pics. After reading reviews about how the primers are especially tough on some surplus ammo, I was wondering I may have some problems with the ammo that I bought. I will order some commercial 8mm but I would really like to buy and use this surplus ammo. Any ideas and general advice are greatly appreciated.


Ammunition Bullet Gun accessory


Yellow Button Fashion accessory Jewellery Circle
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
320 Posts
I have several 8x57 rifles including 2 Turks and have not had any problems igniting the Romanian ammunition; I have had to snap some Turk and Yugo ammunition 2 times to get them to fire. You may have to obtain a Wolf spring in the event your spring is not up to the task. After installing Wolf springs, I have not had any ammunition requiring 2 strikes. After receiving your rifle, if it doesn't fire the Romanian ammo, just obtain a new spring; not a bad idea any way.
 

·
Silver Bullet member
Joined
·
8,002 Posts
70's Romanian 154grain or so bullet and sure fire..good enough for pie plates out past 100yds...
 

·
Gold Bullet member
Joined
·
2,120 Posts
No problems here with Romanian. Pleasant shooting, and like any kind of surplus, accurate in some rifles.

And....we will need those pics!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
383 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for all the tips, guys. I picked up my Mauser on Monday. It had arrived last Friday but I was unable to go to the shop and the owner was not there on Sat. Store rules are that no one handles transfers but him, so I had to wait till Monday. Those UPS people managed to drop the package because the hard case was broken where the metal butstock broke through end of the case. There was no visible damage to the rifle and I'm sure it has seen worse. It is a great looking rifle and soaked in cosmo. Boy, do I have my work cut out for me. I know its a complicated question, but any suggestions as to the clean up? I read somewhere that Greased Lighting cleaner works. Is this true? I won't use it until I can get some advice about it. For now, I'm just gonna use a lot of towels and Hoppes. Here are some pics and again, thanks for all the advice.

Revolver Shotgun


Auto part Automotive engine part
Spiral Eye Close-up Photography Circle
Musical instrument String instrument Guitar String instrument accessory String instrument
Auto part
Auto part
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
299 Posts
i removed all the cosmo out of my vz24 by first removing all the wood, and slowly with a torch warmed the cosmo till most of it flowed out while it was still liquid i was able to wipe the rest out with a rag. the melting point of cosmo is around 130 degrees F so in the places i couldnt get to i poured boiling water though and washed it out.
 

·
Platinum Bullet Member and Certified Curmudgeon
Joined
·
15,533 Posts
Gasoline, rags, toothbrush, dental pic, Q tips, and brass cleaning rod works for me (outdoors). Also a brass brush if there is pitting. Then BLO on the stock and gun oil on the metal.
 

·
Gold Bullet member
Joined
·
1,563 Posts
Yes, gasoline does work well. The problem is that it tends to explode if you aren't careful. I use it sometimes, but it' not my first choice. Brake cleaner from Autozone costs about $2.50, and it does an excellent job. Boiling water works better, but ouch! It hurts! I usually get a box of Wypall rags from autozone (or use the pile 'o old clothes and towels I have in my shop), then take the gun apart ENTIRELY, and clean each part by hand with a rag, then again with brake cleaner and a rag. This process for a given rifle takes about three hours. After that I oil up the gun, and I'm off to the range where cosmoline sweats out of the stock for the next 2,000 rounds or so.

You may not have the facilities for doing this, but if you can get a $45 bluing tank from Brownells, you can immerse the whole stock in lacquer thinner for about two weeks, then remove it, wipe it down, and let it dry for another week. This is important, because the swollen wood will shrink back to its original size when dry. After this process you won't get any more cosmoline sweating out of the stock. Your stock also will have zero finish left, as the lacquer thinner will remove the original finish along with the cosmo.

If you care about the original finish (as I do) you shouldn't use the lacquer thinner, but instead wipe the stock down with warm soapy water, then use boiled linseed oil (BLO) lightly to re-hydrate (for lack of a better word) the stock.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top