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alan - After WWI, Germany had many unemployed gunsmiths and a lot of Mauser parts available for them to utilize in building Mauser hunting rifles. They were sold wherever they could find a market. Yours is very nice rifle, and practically a "textbook example" of kind and quality of work done by them following WWI. Of note is the commercial proof marks on the left side of the large ring '98 receiver, double-set triggers, and solid barrel rib for the sights. The bolt is number mismatched, because civilians were required to turn in all arms by WWII Allied occupation forces. The bolt was likely removed, thrown in a separate pile, and re-united later with another bolt from the pile by an enterprising GI. The bolt is from a WWI 98a carbine (note the flat checkered surface on the inside of the bolt knob). It may have had a "butter knife" style when it left the shop. Watch internet auctions like Gunbroker for similar listings to get an idea of it's present day value. Enjoy !
 

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First alanbmx, thank you for the quality photos which make identification/evaluation much easier and more precise.

Alkali's comment above sums up the situation of an interwar cottage industry in sporterizing military mauser rifles such as yours. However, I do question the proof marks shown, which just to memory were of a employed pre 1912 or so. That would place the (re)manufacture of your rifle before WWI. Perhaps I'm wrong.

I understand fro your comments that you have fired the rifle. Regardless, I offer the following cautionary comments.
It also should be pointed out regarding these "reworked" rifles, that: A. Occasionally they were rechambered. It is important to verify the chambering if there is any doubt. B. An unfortunately larger possibility, that at sometime the bolt body itself may have been substituted in an inappropriate manner. IF the non-original bolt was substituted at the time of sporterization, presumably proper fitment occurred. However in the intervening 80 or so years on average, the bolt in the rifle may have been later substituted. The point here is that the fit of the bolt to the mating receiver is a critical fit. If there is any intention to further fire the rifle, a qualified gunsmith should perform a "headspace" check; a simple test which should take only a matter of minutes. In simpler terms, the gunsmith should determine whether the rifle is safe to fire.

As to value, unfortunately these rifles generally don't command a very great price unless they were done in the fashion of an unusually high quality rebuild. From what I can see in the photos, on average I would suggest a value from $200 to perhaps $300. Likely, the rifle's highest value is as a family heirloom.

My take.
 

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These CROWN - crown/N proofmarks, indicating use of the "4000 atm proof powder", were used by the Zella-Mehlis proofhouse up into the 1920s, as Long as stocks lasted. There should be more proofmarks and numbers under the Barrel, showing bore/land (not groove/bullet!) diameter, case length, proof date (numbers for month, year) and, if Zella-Mehlis proof, a ledger number for the month. Maybe even trademarks of the gunmaker and barrelmaker. As the bolt is mismatched and Shows no civilian proofmarks, the rifle should be checked as iskra noted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
These CROWN - crown/N proofmarks, indicating use of the "4000 atm proof powder", were used by the Zella-Mehlis proofhouse up into the 1920s, as Long as stocks lasted. There should be more proofmarks and numbers under the Barrel, showing bore/land (not groove/bullet!) diameter, case length, proof date (numbers for month, year) and, if Zella-Mehlis proof, a ledger number for the month. Maybe even trademarks of the gunmaker and barrelmaker. As the bolt is mismatched and Shows no civilian proofmarks, the rifle should be checked as iskra noted.
I took the stock off, here are the markings I found, the bolts/screws that hold the trigger to the barrel are stamped with the same number that is engraved on the inside of the stock







 

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This rifle was proofed at the Zella-Mehlis proofhouse 2,20 = February 1920, gun number 738 of that month. The Gew.98 large ring receiver was made late in WW1 by the electric equipment concern Siemens & Halske, who forged and machined many such Receivers and sent them to the Suhl and Zella-Mehlis gunmakers to be completed there into the star-marked Gew98 rifles. The many marks under the receiver ring are internal factory quality control marks that documented the many machining steps. The magazine box-triggerguard-set Trigger assembly seems to be a leftover from a commercial rifle of Mauser, Oberndorf, pre-WW1 make, as it shows the typical Long set Trigger mainspring and the trigger parts are set directly into the machined bottom metal, without a seperate housing like the aftermarket double set triggers. Is there another Serial number on the rear wall of the magazine box?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
This rifle was proofed at the Zella-Mehlis proofhouse 2,20 = February 1920, gun number 738 of that month. The Gew.98 large ring receiver was made late in WW1 by the electric equipment concern Siemens & Halske, who forged and machined many such Receivers and sent them to the Suhl and Zella-Mehlis gunmakers to be completed there into the star-marked Gew98 rifles. The many marks under the receiver ring are internal factory quality control marks that documented the many machining steps. The magazine box-triggerguard-set Trigger assembly seems to be a leftover from a commercial rifle of Mauser, Oberndorf, pre-WW1 make, as it shows the typical Long set Trigger mainspring and the trigger parts are set directly into the machined bottom metal, without a seperate housing like the aftermarket double set triggers. Is there another Serial number on the rear wall of the magazine box?
No there is not anything on the rear wall of the magazine box. thank you very much for the info. Any recommendations for stock repairs, the stock has a crack and I am looking for a trustworthy gunsmith
 

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Very nice rifle and good workmanship too.
BRGDS, A
 
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