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Took my Enfield out after the snow receded from my field. Not that it matters, but I began zeroing at 25 yards (bullseyes), but in moving back to 100 yds. I was low. What I found after not being able to move my elevation dial is that I need a very specific tool (looked on-line) which, I'll have to look for. I'm sure I'll find one
Optics are clear as a bell, and they are specific to the rifle. Anyway, just thought I'd post it to share.
 

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Very nice! That's one Sniper I've just started to get around to look for. If I can find one that will hold groups as well as my '54 No.4 Mk. II then I'll shoot more .303.
 

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Cool! your scope was originally issued with your rifle. That is quite rare.

If you can't move that elevation turret, be VERY careful with it!

I also have a No.4 Mk.1(T) with a 32 Mk.3 scope, and there is no tool necessary to move the range setting on the turret. The turret should be easily finger adjustable.

My recollection is that one of the earlier 'marks' needed something to adjust it, but it was NOT the Mark 3.

Also, you only need a FMJ bulleted cartridge to adjust the range MARKINGS on the Mark 3 turret to match up the range it was zeroed in for. No 'tool' necessary.

The elevation turret froze on my scope a while back and I tried forcing it. The result: it needed a trip to Canada to one of only two people I know of that work on these scopes (the other is in England), and it took couple hundred dollars' worth of new parts and repair work to make it right again.


If you really can't move that turret, I suggest you get it to someone who knows his way around the No.32 scope before something bad and potentially expensive happens. It is a lot cheaper if it gets fixed BEFORE it breaks.
 

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If your range drum will not turn you have a larger problem. Please contact Warren Wheatfield or Brian Dick. Please don't squirt anything in the drum or use a heat gun.. I would not recommend any disassembling. There are only two possibly three people in the world you could trust for this work. Don't pull up A&B scope repair on the google and expect anything but disaster.

Good luck.

..MJ..
 

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Awesome No.4T.

When you get the scope sorted out, if it were me, I'd seek a quality repro No 32 scope (if one exists) and use that for range work. Granted most folks just don't shoot their original (and expensive) sniper rifles for fear of scope failures and that is a reality / risk and totally understandable. The work around that is shoot the rifle with repro scope.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Awesome No.4T.

When you get the scope sorted out, if it were me, I'd seek a quality repro No 32 scope (if one exists) and use that for range work. Granted most folks just don't shoot their original (and expensive) sniper rifles for fear of scope failures and that is a reality / risk and totally understandable. The work around that is shoot the rifle with repro scope.
Actually, I really don't plan on taking this out to my range too often. If anything it may be out for some occasion or whatever. If anything, I'd be interested in finding out it's history, if that can be done through the serial number. As for repairing the scope, that's an option I'll explore, just not right now, I'm building a house so you know how that goes. Toys to the back burner.....
 

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Your scope serial number matches the number stamped on the top wrist of the rifle's stock.

You may not realize how rare that is, but I haven't heard of all that many scope/rifle combinations that match.

That scope was originally set up on, and issued with, that rifle.


I don't have figures to support it, but I am pretty certain that well over 90% of the No.4 (T)'s out there do not have their matching scopes.

My scope serial is only a couple hundred off yours (mine is 24635) and it differs from yours in that the scope body doesn't bell out to the rear. My 32 Mk.3 scope has the same diameter lenses both in front and in back.


The talk about backup scopes reminds me.....

Last fall, I bought a Japanese-made reproduction scope mount (with what looks to be a fairly inexpensive 4X Japanese-made scope already in it) that is designed to fit the Enfield sniper bases at a local gun show.

Unlike the originals, the mount is blued machined steel, and is pretty scrawny (I have to back up the rifle's original attachment knobs with three washers each to get everything to go together tight. There's way too much threaded 'screw length' on the original knobs.), but I only paid about $40 for it. I figure I couldn't go wrong for that price.

Despite the need for the washers, once everything is cranked down tight, the repro mount does fit up pretty well to the original bases on my rifle. I haven't shot the rifle with this scope yet, but this might be happening before the end of the month.
 

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I don't have figures to support it, but I am pretty certain that well over 90% of the No.4 (T)'s out there do not have their matching scopes.
Ron:

I don't have any hard facts or figures either, but in my experience the majority of British No.4 snipers I examined (back when I was actively perusing them), were equipped with their matching numbered scopes. In fact almost every rifle and scope combination matched.

Matching sniper rifles and scopes with matching numbered scope cans were somewhat less common, and rigs with matching numbered wooden chests were harder still. But matching rifles and scopes were common.

I must note that this was back in the early to mid '80s when a complete rig, in the wooden chest with scope can (or pouch), could be found for $500-$750.

Of course my experience may not be an accurate reflection of the overall population of Brit snipers because I was only searching for completely matched rigs, and my search preferences no doubt skewed the results I encountered.
 

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Lovely set ;)
 

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Ron:

I don't have any hard facts or figures either, but in my experience the majority of British No.4 snipers I examined (back when I was actively perusing them), were equipped with their matching numbered scopes. In fact almost every rifle and scope combination matched.
That certainly hasn't been my experience. I got my set (transit chest and the whole nine yards) in 1970 for $100 delivered. It didn't match, and neither did the two sets my brothers bought at the same time. These rifles were imported some time before then, close enough to the time of John Kennedy's assassination that selling scoped sniper rifles was going to draw fire and the scopes were separated from the rifles.

A bunch of 1903A4 rifles sold at about this time were also sold separate from their scopes for the same reason.

By 1970, the sensitivity to this 'problem' evidently went away and the scopes got 'reunited' with the rifles on a pretty random basis before they were sold.

Perhaps a bunch that came in around 1980 didn't go through this, but the guy I sent my No.32 to when I needed it fixed mentioned that matching rifles and scopes in his experience was pretty rare, and he was maintaining a database on scope and rifle serial numbers in order to reunite matching sets..
 

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There are two sites I know of that offer a matching service for scopes and rifles but by the time you have zeroed and adjusted you erector set what would you be getting in trading for the correct numbered scope? As Peter Laidler asks what is matching anyway?
 

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what would you be getting in trading for the correct numbered scope? As Peter Laidler asks what is matching anyway?
Well, for one, you would have the scope that was issued with the specific rifle you have, which should on most levels be just as important as having the matching bolt.

I know all matching numbers are VERY important to 1960's muscle car collectors, but what difference does it REALLY make if your '65GTO has its original numbers 389, a non-matching 389, or some 1990's crate motor in it? Several thousand dollars, usually! Yes, there IS a difference that discerning collectors would recognize.

Would you be willing to pay the same for an ALL MATCHING (scope to rifle) No. 4(T) (or a matched 91-30PU for that matter), as you would for one which has some randomly chosen, scope on it? How about the same for the bolt?

Secondly, How many mismatched PU's need to be re-zeroed when they come out of the box? It is rare for the mounts to get separated from the scopes. The mount you get with the matching scope was the one intended to be used with the bases that were fitted and put on that specific matching rifle. Although the variations should be minor, using a mismatched mount and base combination will usually end up with the scope not pointing exactly where it should be when there have been no adjustments made for zeroing the scope.
 

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Nice rifle.
There is factory matching, and used in the field matching.

These rifles were numbered to the scope and the scope to the rifle, usually on the mount.
Matching examples are very less common.
 

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Thank you for your comments but what I would be getting Ronbo6 is possibly someones monkeyed with or sized up problem #32 in trade for my working and regulated and full rang and windage available scope. I will stick with Capt. Laidlers view of what works works. Plus who was talking about PU scoped rifles ? They are a subject all of their own and you won't find their values at all the same.

I hope everyone had a smart Armed Forces Day.

Cheers
..MJ..
 

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Thank you for your comments but what I would be getting Ronbo6 is possibly someones monkeyed with or sized up problem #32 in trade for my working and regulated and full rang and windage available scope. I will stick with Capt. Laidlers view of what works works. Plus who was talking about PU scoped rifles ? They are a subject all of their own and you won't find their values at all the same.

Cheers
..MJ..

I know from experience that in 2012 it cost me about $300 for an expert to obtain the necessary parts and repair a damaged turret on my No.32 Mark 3 scope. You can see one of my previous posts about having had a damaged one.

I suspect that having a scope on your rifle that actually matches the wrist number would increase the rifle's value by a good bit more than $300. It's called RARITY.

It comes down to $$$.

I am willing to bet that, everything else being equal, a 91-30PU with its matching scope would command a higher price than a run of the mill scope-unmatched sniper set. Which would YOU prefer to buy under the circumstances? Yes, you don't pay as much for them, but the principle still applies.

If you don't want to talk 91-30's, what is your opinion of the relative value of scope matched Vs. scope unmatched Japanese snipers?

Tell you what. Hypothetical situation. I will get together a bunch of all original k98 Mausers, all matching, except with mismatched bolts, and trade you even up for an identical number of all original, ALL matching k98's, all in the same condition, that YOU put together.

What? You wouldn't make THAT deal? WHY? A bolt is a bolt, isn't it?
 
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