Gunboards Forums banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,628 Posts
It all sounds good except for the stick the bayonet in the ground part. But it's your rifle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,533 Posts
"Today I noticed I'm down to about half a bottle of Hoppe's #9, but the bore is beginning to really shine"

How much of the Hoppes have you consumed? Might be the reason for the shine. Hoppes makes my chrome teeth shine, with no worry about rust later, (tater).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,628 Posts
Gents, There is nothing wrong with sticking your bayonet in the ground. I just prefer to stick my bayonet into other things! ;)
 

·
Gold Bullet member
Joined
·
550 Posts
Gents, There is nothing wrong with sticking your bayonet in the ground. I just prefer to stick my bayonet into other things! ;)

You are a naughty, nasty boy !!


regards....(sound familiar) roger
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
587 Posts
1. Stop shooting, open bayonet and stick it in the ground.
Josh <><

Josh,

There is nothing wrong with your procedure for cleaning. Sticking the bayonet in the ground works....If it works for you so much the better. After all, it is your rifle. That there are no rocks in the ground is a good thing, however, the dirt will wear off the bluing on the bayonet. A rack to hold the rifle may be a better way to go in the long run. Other rifles may need the same attention. Hot water works great. Also think about glass cleaner with ammonia. The ammonia will neutralize the corrosive chemicals. I swab the barrel while it is still hot from shooting at the range. Then I run a oily patch down the barrel. Was taught this by a good friend and it works for me. The heavy cleaning I do at home.

AJ
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,703 Posts
I think that pouring water down a barrel is a little extreme for a M44. How do you keep the water out of the barrel threads? Just a patch or two with water or Windex (not really enough ammonia to be very effective and its soap content helps) is enough to neutralize the primer salts. You may be causing the "brown bore" (surface rust) and giving the Hoppes more work to do. Hoppes was developed in the era of corrosive primers and the company advertises that it still works to neutralize those salts. It does, at least in my experience. Also, try swabbing with Hoppes and leaving it in the bore for a while (days, weeks) - using no dry patch to remove it and no oil after it. I have hundreds of firearms stored with Hoppes in the bore and none have rusted. Hoppes will "pull" the microscopic particles of jacket material and powder from the grain of the steel. It works 24/7/365. Trash is forced by high pressure into the steel shot by shot, layer by layer. A couple of passes with a brush or a patch won't get it all out. Use the single nap cotton milspec patches from Brownells for best results - not those synthestic POS's. Rapid evaporation of water - either hot or into a hot barrel can cause rapid oxidation (surface rust) that will have to be removed later. Why add work? I offer these suggestions for whatever benefit you may have from them.

Oh, stick your bayonet into anything you want! :eek: DDR
 

·
Silver Bullet Member
Joined
·
2,086 Posts
It all sounds good except for the stick the bayonet in the ground part. But it's your rifle.
Sticking the bayonet in the ground can wear away the protective bluing and lead to rusting of the bayonet. Why risk your rifle's historic integrity to this abuse? A better solution would be to stop shooting and then stick your bayonet into a Taliban fighter and then pour boiling water down the barrel. When you remove the bayonet it will then be coated with a with a protective film that you can let dry on the spike and not have to worry about rust since hemoglobin is an iron carrying compound.:rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
587 Posts
then stick your bayonet into a Taliban fighter and then pour boiling water down the barrel. When you remove the bayonet it will then be coated with a with a protective film that you can let dry on the spike and not have to worry about rust since hemoglobin is an iron carrying compound.:rolleyes:

Ever seen a weapon that has been blood soaked and not cleaned? Rusted and pitted to say the least. Also blood will eat through nickel plate if left on there for a couple of days.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,533 Posts
I've become convinced that the ammonia in Windex doesn't do a thing.

I located a chemestry professor at college and asked him about it. When you fire, the potassium chlorate turns to potassium chloride, the salts which attract water.

He put that up on the board and added the chemical representation for ammonia. There wasn't anything there to indicate a reaction between the two.

The conclusion we came to is that Windex is just a very good, quick evaporating detergent. I'm not saying the Windex thing is bad, but the ammonia doesn't seem to do a thing except add to the quick evaporation.

The hot water washes all the salts out. I've not had a problem with it at all, as long as it's boiling.

My range is in my backyard, so I get to clean very quickly.

Josh <><
Failing grade to the chem prof.

Windex is not a detergent. And the ammonia will have an effect of copper fouling. The water in Windex will take out some of the salts from primer. Best to clean while barrel is hot. Use Shooter's Choice, Hoppes #9 and other flavors for good bore cleaning. Avoid the metal brush and if compelled to use one, wrap a patch over it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
brown bore

Hi All,

Even though I have a very accurate M44, the bore seemed uncleanable. I later found out this is called "brown bore."

Josh,
For me if it's an accurate rifle, I don't care what the bore looks like after I clean it.
I short stroke 1 or 2 passes and then a couple dry patches of just about any of the popular solvents that knock out carbon and copper. Then forget about it, don't look, she'll be ok. I've got a beater M-44 with a sewer pipe bore but it shoots great. I'm more impressed with a tack driver than a mirror bore. Be careful not to damage the crown with alot of cleaning, that will mess up your accuracy in a hurry.
Just my opinion,
and yes opinions are like ...holes everyone has one.
good shootin,
fayettebr
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,533 Posts
" Be careful not to damage the crown with alot of cleaning, that will mess up your accuracy in a hurry."

Don't clean from the front, use a good rod and this should never be a worry. But you are absolutely correct that damage to the crown will make a mess of things in a New York Minute.
 

·
Silver Bullet Member
Joined
·
2,086 Posts
Ever seen a weapon that has been blood soaked and not cleaned? Rusted and pitted to say the least. Also blood will eat through nickel plate if left on there for a couple of days.

Then it that case, just leave it stuck in the Taliban!;) Somewhere, you have lost your sense of humor.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top