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I picked up an M96 barrelled action Monday that I plan to use to build an M41 clone for a guest rifle for vintage sniper matches. My original plan was to install a Lothar Walther barrel like I did for my original M41. Someone had cut 3" cut off the barrel on that one so I had no choice. The bore on this one looks great so I'm going to try it first.

My research says these were all modified in the 1950's and they originally installed a nylon "ring" over the threads for protection when not using the blank adapter. I see aftermarket muzzle caps for sale but they don't look very good. Any experience with this?
 

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Nothing wrong with the muzzle caps most everyone here is familiar with. The main issue with those are damaged or worn threads that don't allow the cap to be installed correctly. My shooter has a cap that fits and if not for the slight difference in the color of the bluing someone not familiar with Swedes would never know it.
 

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I picked up an M96 barrelled action Monday that I plan to use to build an M41 clone for a guest rifle for vintage sniper matches. My original plan was to install a Lothar Walther barrel like I did for my original M41. Someone had cut 3" cut off the barrel on that one so I had no choice. The bore on this one looks great so I'm going to try it first.

My research says these were all modified in the 1950's and they originally installed a nylon "ring" over the threads for protection when not using the blank adapter. I see aftermarket muzzle caps for sale but they don't look very good. Any experience with this?
I bought a metal thread on cap for my M96 from Numrich Arms. I think it looks good and it doesn't interfere with the bayonet mount. It was sort of pricy, and I'd have preferred one of the yellow nylon (believe it was) caps the Swedes actually used but never saw one on the loose. The Numrich cap was in $20 range which I thought a bit steep but I haven't seen one cheaper.
Not long ago I actually bought one of the blank adapters that shred the wooden bullet from Steve Eisel (some here on these boards call him "Gray Blanket) for $5.00 (plus shipping) on ebay. I have never seen one cheaper and was glad to get it.
 

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Muzzle protectors

Here are examples of muzzle thread protectors :

1st = milky white , open end thread protector

2nd = yellow closed end thread protector

3rd = original Swedish steel thread protector ( RARE if you ever find one )

4th = aftermarket steel thread protector ( why they put the large radius on the end is unknown to me ????????? )

5th = closed end muzzle protector for non-threaded barrels
 

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As I've mentioned before, you can make use of the threaded muzzle by attaching the screw-on Swiss Products muzzle brake. Although designed for the Swiss K31, it fits the Swedish muzzle thread exactly. Recoil reduction is even more effective when used with the Swedish Mauser. If you shoot 140 gr M94/41 or equivalent reloads, the recoil reduction is significant, but it really shines if you shoot original M94 or the equivalent. Norma - Alaska - and Lapua - Mega - make flat base round nose bullets. The Norma Alaska has a crimp groove and a concave bullet base, to mimic the contour of the rolled end of the jacket. This load is by no stretch a "girly" load and it does kick. I might mention that Prvi Partizan also has a 156 gr flat base RN bullet that is a lot less expensive than the hard-to-find Norma Alaska. IMG_0910.v01.jpg IMG_0909.v01.jpg

The rifle shown is a 42 HVA but it retains the original sights calibrated for M94. The rear sight notch is a square Patridge style which I really like. It seems to me to have a more clear and precise sight picture than the semi-circular notch. I decided to reload an M94 equivalent for this rifle since the sights are calibrated for it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for all the tips. The muzzle caps I've seen had a big gap when installed, but probably due to bad threads on the barrel as mentioned. The threads on mine are perfect so I don't see this as an issue. I'll order one and have my shop modify it to be like an original. The Swiss Products muzzle brake is interesting but would not be legal for the CMP sniper matches.

I paid $200 for the barreled action but it is almost mint with the original blueing all there except in contact points. The shop owner said it had been there for over ten years and he wouldn't charge me extra for the dust. The bolt has been modified to accommodate a scope but the receiver isn't drilled. I plan to shoot it with irons in the next few days and see how accurate it is before drilling for the M41 mount.

I bought a beautiful M96 earlier this year for this purpose for $250. It has an arsenal-replaced stock and barrel. Unfortunately, the bore was rough. It keyholed the target. A buddy shamed me into leaving it alone as he pointed out that even though it didn't have the "original" barrel and stock, it was still correct for that configuration with matching numbers throughout and near mint otherwise. As the owner of numerous Swedes, he had never seen one with a corroded bore and suggested it might be hardened cosmoline. He took it home and cleaned and shot it repeatedly for several weeks. I think he even slept with it. The bore still feels a little rough but it will group an inch. I've considered trying the David Tubb bore polishing bullets but since it shoots well within my accuracy requirements, I'll probably leave it alone.
 

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Have you tried some Sweets? My bores copper foul pretty good and I run a patch of Sweets through them occasionally. 15 minutes later a dry patch then some Hoppes, some Mobil 1 to neutralize it and a dry patch or two and even my worst bore shines like new money.

Vintage Sniper is a hoot especially when your shooting a Swede. Problem is a lot of other shooters know that too.
 

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I use Ballistol for regular bore cleaning, and PatchOut for occasional deep cleaning. Ballistol controls copper fouling without completely stripping it. I clean at the range while the bore is still warm. I pull patches until they come out clean, then leave the bore with a coat of Ballistol. When I next shoot the rifle, I pull a clean dry patch, and it typically comes out with green streaks.

Bear in mind that a bore typically shoots best with some coppering; the trick is to find equilibrium. With my protocol POI does not change from one range session to the next. If I completely clean out all copper, I have to shoot - and waste - a number of rounds before the groups tighten up again.
 

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I make several dozen various thread protectors every week....I think we have a 96 barrel somewhere at work I will take a look at it and see what would suit it.Probably something made from hard alloy and then anodised.
 

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My thread protector

Here is a sketch of a thread protector that screws up flush with the shoulder of the barrel . You can also modify a SAMCO thread protector to fit square to the shoulder by relieving the threads at the end . I used a metal scraper to taper the chamfer at the end , or use the compound tool post . Of course you need a lathe to do either way .
 

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For what it's worth, I found that brass feruls for joining brake or hydraulic lines have exactly the right thread.
I had a piece of threaded barrel from decades ago when we used to chop these fine rifles for hunting. (Not any more!!)
Screw the threaded brass 'nut' onto the piece of barrel, chuck it up in the lathe, and take off the hex corners to round. polish a bit and Bob's your uncle.
These hyd. fittings cover the muzzle end to some degree, so look half decent if stained down a bit. download (4).jpg download (3).jpg
 

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In British military service brass parts like badges, buckles and rifle sling clips were blackened with hot sodium hydroxide solutions. The more modern way is to use a selenium based solution at room temperature which you might find you could get work done at a local trophy engraving shop, though there are also other chemicals. Depending on the amount of work there are plenty of sellers online offering products if you wanted some quantity to work with.
 
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