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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have always meant to take these photos to show Seinen but got around doing it at last today. Thanks to his lead on an auction I was able to get this great T-22 rig sometime back on Gunbroker for $800 bin. The T-22 is marked with the Sendai High School of Industry mark, and is blessed with the all important original bolt head and handguard which are frequently missing on T-22s.
Additional goodies were the cleaining rod still snugly tucked away in the buttstock compartment, the original aluminum buckled sling, and the very neat 2nd variation bayonet with scabbard.
What was also nice about the seller of the auction was that he kicked in a pretty rare Type 11 LMG canvas ammo pouch full of original 6.5mm ammo, and two clips of 6.5mm dummy rounds. which were not even mentioned on the auction description !
One of those once in a long while great hauls that you come upon thanks to great friends !!
 

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Nice stolen rig ;) Me Likey!
On the sling - the lower end looks much like a standard T-38 sling, what's going on with the upper attachment?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you for the compliments gentlemen !
Helomover, the Type 22 was adopted into the IJA in 1887 as the first repeater rifle designed by the Japanese arsenal (designed by then arsenal chief Tsuneyoshi Murata. First modern rifle designer of Japan. Also did the Type 13 and Type 18 11mm single shot rifles), and used the first small caliber cartridge (8mm) with smokeless powder, much smaller and better ballistics than the 11mm being used before with their single shot ype 13s and Type 18s. The T-22 saw some action at the Sino-Japanese war, Taiwan occupation, Boxer rebellion and with some rear duty soldier's during the Russo-Japanese war, but all in all the compbat reliability was not very good and quickly replaced by the 6.5mm Type 30 rifle when that came out in 1897 to 1898 timeframe.

Dawgs, yes, the sling design itself is pretty much the same as a T-38 sling except for the very early aluminum buckle and the welted edges. The upper attachment is actually sewed on, probably because it may have broken during training use at the school in Sendai.
 

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Thanks for the sling info. I have two slings with the aluminum buckles and I think they both have welted edges. How are your keepers sewn? Are they overlapped & sewn or butted & sewn?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Dawgs, the keeper have been overlap sewn. My belief that these aluminum buckle and stud slings were originally for the T-22 comes from the realization that the T-22 ammo pouch strap down studs being made of aluminum are the only rifle accessory that uses aluminum for the metal components.
 

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Dawgs, the keeper have been overlap sewn. My belief that these aluminum buckle and stud slings were originally for the T-22 comes from the realization that the T-22 ammo pouch strap down studs being made of aluminum are the only rifle accessory that uses aluminum for the metal components.
You may have something there. One of my slings with the aluminum buckle came on a minty early 4th series nagoya carbine but who knows when it was added?
One of my slings has the keeper that is just butted together & sewn. Here's a photo of it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Dawgs, yep that sure is one of 'em ! Nice example.

Jareth, yep I recall that too. Back then I was unconvinced that it would be a Murata sling since I thought that aluminum would be too rare and expensive a metal for use as such parts back in those early years. Until that is when I found an original T-22 ammo pouch that had the aluminum studs.
 

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You were right to think that about aluminum. Back then it was rare and expensive. Available only to the very rich, AND the military. My research has shown, that some of the earliest uses of aluminum, were in the world militaries. It wasn't til the 1930s' that it became the wonder metal. Then everything in the kitchen was aluminum. And that generation, was the first to be diagnosed with Alzhiemer's disease. Hmmm...
 

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Thank you for the compliments gentlemen !
Helomover, the Type 22 was adopted into the IJA in 1887 as the first repeater rifle designed by the Japanese arsenal (designed by then arsenal chief Tsuneyoshi Murata. First modern rifle designer of Japan. Also did the Type 13 and Type 18 11mm single shot rifles), and used the first small caliber cartridge (8mm) with smokeless powder, much smaller and better ballistics than the 11mm being used before with their single shot ype 13s and Type 18s. The T-22 saw some action at the Sino-Japanese war, Taiwan occupation, Boxer rebellion and with some rear duty soldier's during the Russo-Japanese war, but all in all the compbat reliability was not very good and quickly replaced by the 6.5mm Type 30 rifle when that came out in 1897 to 1898 timeframe.

Dawgs, yes, the sling design itself is pretty much the same as a T-38 sling except for the very early aluminum buckle and the welted edges. The upper attachment is actually sewed on, probably because it may have broken during training use at the school in Sendai.
Edokko, Thanks for the reply!;)
 
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