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I've been looking for a mummed and matching Nagoya Type 99 Long for awhile, and missed out on at least 3 last year because I waited too long to make a decision. I grabbed this one off the trader from a another member. I added one of Don's monopods, and a dust cover I had laying around. I don't usually do that, but I don't think I'll find a complete original Nagoya Long is pretty slim. It'll look good on the wall with the rest of the Nagoya production.

Everything else matches and is correct. Notice the rounded front sight and the location of the of the numbers on the extractor and firing pin being different than on short rifle production. This carried over onto the earliest no-series short rifles as well, but eventually was placed in the location we commonly think of on 99 short rifles.

Only around 8,000 Nagoya Long 99's were made, making them fairly uncommon. However, I will say that mummed examples are much more "common" than the Toyo Kogyo 35th series

Glad to have it either way!
 

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Only around 8,000 Nagoya Long 99's were made, making them fairly uncommon. However, I will say that mummed examples are much more "common" than the Toyo Kogyo 35th series
I too missed out a very nice Nagoya long (Mum intact and with correct but not original monopod) sold on this forum trader roughly two years ago.

I am very curious why mummed TK long are much less common than mummed Nagoya, even though the production number was higher.
 

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Conrad,
Notice the pentagon proof on the extractor. The long rifles as well as early no series short rifles have the geometric proofs. It seems when they changed the way the numbers match them they also changed the style or proof marks.
 

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I too missed out a very nice Nagoya long (Mum intact and with correct but not original monopod) sold on this forum trader roughly two years ago.

I am very curious why mummed TK long are much less common than mummed Nagoya, even though the production number was higher.
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They are rare because the mum is supposed to be scratched off before they were brought back home. No trace of the emperor's seal was too be left on the rifle.
 

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It looks nice Conrad. Great addition to the lineage. How is the stock proofed? Nagoya Chi? Or Nagoya Ri? Never mind I answered my own question.
 

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Looks nice! Ok this might be the convincing I need to get a repro pod for mine. I got the cleaning rod from Don, but the chances of finding an original pod is unicorn hunting. Mine is #8238, highest reported that I've heard of at least.
 

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Awesome example! A mummed and matching 99 long in 1993 for $175 is what started me down the road of 30 years of Japanese collecting. Like you, I added a finish-matching dust cover and one of Don’s pods. I downsized my rifles over the past couple of years as my collecting focus has shifted a bit, but kept some solid representative pieces including that Nagoya long (which started a conversation with Shannon Ziegler as I was walking out the door with it: we were both stationed at Bragg). I had an “interesting” debate with a member of your FB page over calling Nagoya 99 longs “zero series” as part of their prime ID, and him calling the assembly numbers on his TK long “series numbers” with his being “special” because it was marked on the back of the bayonet lug. I wasn’t anything but factual, but he blocked me for challenging his knowledge or hurting his feelings on two days in a row I guess. I’m understanding the apparent crankiness of older collectors now from the late-90s when I was a 30-something moderator here and tried to calm some of the harsh edges and arguments between some of the more cantankerous “seniors” from whom we learned so much. I guess I have become one (but I am still open every day to learning and debate).
 
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