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sks, tokarev, makarov, combloc
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here is a real tragedy. This should serve as an example of why people should not take old military guns to state run gun buy backs. Pictured is a type 38 carbine from Mukden in series 6 serial number 34076. While I am not an expert, Honeycutt book reports that less than 11,000 were made in this series. I am not sure how the bolt is numbered. This one has a matching number on one side of the bolt handle and a different number underneath the bolt handle. Otherwise, the bayonet lug matches. Someone got $50 debit card and now it must be demilled or destroyed. One person told me that he has seen these sell for a $1000 or more.
A desirable collector is lost and the family got a pittance for what their ancestor brought back from WW II.
I plan to use this example to argue to legislators that the buyback programs not only don't work but deprive the family of a proper recovery ( not to mention the loss to the collecting world).
Those who know, let me know what it is worth so I can make my best argument against these programs.
I tried outside shaded pictures and I might go back for better ones.
This one will not be destroyed, yet. It will be rendered unusable and placed with a local military museum. Once on display no one will know it was rendered unusable in ways that will not show. Still it is a loss to collectors and to the family.
 

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Here is a real tragedy. This should serve as an example of why people should not take old military guns to state run gun buy backs. Pictured is a type 38 carbine from Mukden in series 6 serial number 34076. While I am not an expert, Honeycutt book reports that less than 11,000 were made in this series. I am not sure how the bolt is numbered. This one has a matching number on one side of the bolt handle and a different number underneath the bolt handle. Otherwise, the bayonet lug matches. Someone got $50 debit card and now it must be demilled or destroyed. One person told me that he has seen these sell for a $1000 or more.
A desirable collector is lost and the family got a pittance for what their ancestor brought back from WW II.
I plan to use this example to argue to legislators that the buyback programs not only don't work but deprive the family of a proper recovery ( not to mention the loss to the collecting world).
Those who know, let me know what it is worth so I can make my best argument against these programs.
I tried outside shaded pictures and I might go back for better ones.
This one will not be destroyed, yet. It will be rendered unusable and placed with a local military museum. Once on display no one will know it was rendered unusable in ways that will not show. Still it is a loss to collectors and to the family. View attachment 777681 View attachment 777682 View attachment 777683 View attachment 777684 View attachment 777685 View attachment 777686
At least I will sleep better tonight knowing this evil weapon is off the street. The world is full of stupid ignorant people. Just get used to it.
 

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If it is going to a museum why render it unusable?
 

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sks, tokarev, makarov, combloc
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If it is going to a museum why render it unusable?
Because it was bought as part of a buy back program, it must be destroyed or rendered inoperable if given to a museum. If the museum does not ever want it, it must then be destroyed!
The logic, or lack of logic, is that this program is intended to get guns off the streets and out of the hands of criminals by buying guns and then destroying them. The fact that a 6.5 or 7.7 round costs $1.50 to $2.00 each and as a bolt action is of no interest to criminals is ignored.
I am not sure if they even check to see if any gun has been reported stolen. If so, it should be returned to the victim. I don't think they are doing this. I will be looking into this some more.
 

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No sympathy for the person who turned it in. If they're stupid enough to think a WWII rifle is only worth 50 bucks and should be destroyed then they don't deserve what it's really worth. All it takes is a google search.
 

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No sympathy for the person who turned it in. If they're stupid enough to think a WWII rifle is only worth 50 bucks and should be destroyed then they don't deserve what it's really worth. All it takes is a google search.
Do not be too quick to judge. Many widows do not know what their husband brought back from the war, all they know it is some old gun. But I do agree with you that most people are ignorant.

James
 

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True, but my sympathy only goes to the ones ripped of by dealers or collectors who lie about the value to old ladies or Veterans themselves (when I was younger I was at a table selling WWII weapons, and a widow was selling a Femaru with holster, and the dealer told her it was only worth 250 and he paid like 150 for it). But there really isn't an excuse for this, anyone with half a brain should know a WWII rifle is worth more than 50 bucks. All they would've had to do is take it to a dealer (who probably would've lowballed the heck out of them, but they would've definitely got more than a paltry 50 dollar gift card). I have a thing against lying about the value to get a super lowball price, but anyone who would take 50 dollars for a WWII rifle is lacking in the common sense department.
 

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All that being said, buy backs are an enormous waste of taxpayer money, and only serve as a PR stunt for liberal police departments and liberal politicians. This is a shame, but it only makes my Mukden more valuable. Just goes to show that if you don't do your research on anything, don't expect to get a fair price for something valuable unless you deal with someone like me, who has a moral objection to lying about an item (unless you're a dealer, a dealer should know what he has and if he doesn't it's his own fault).
 
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