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Discussion Starter #4
there is a chance, unless someone one can speak up and prove me wrong, that this is the only mts13 in the US. I have been searching for years and never found anyone else.
 

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I have never seen nor heard of these types of weapons. Can you provide more information on them? Obviously target/competition rifles, but what caliber, origins, history, etc.? Please enlighten those of us "not in the know"!

VERY nice, BTW. Would love to own one of those beauties!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Well the larger one is 7.62x54r(mts13-1) and the smaller one in 22lr(mts12). They are made in Tula Russia, and were never intended for commercial sales but for competition. These rifles are the work of Mikhail Margolin, a blind gunsmith at the Tula ordnance factory. Apparently he went blind after taking a bullet in the head in battle and after spending time in a sanitarium started carving models of trigger mechanisms and gun models from wood and aluminum. He had extensive firearm and machining experience before going blind, so he used it as a hobby to pass the time, and ended up getting recruited by Tula. Look him up, I'm probably not doing the story justice, Margolin is better known for his Olympic target pistols but also made amazing rifles. I don't know how many MTS12's were made and they made more mts12 than mts13 but Tula made less than 600 of the Mts13. I say less than 600, though I'm not sure exactly but the number is said to be less than 600. The MTS Margolin rifles were made for the sole reason of wining in competition and not for commercial sale, so Tula spared no expense on the production. They say that only 25 Mts12 are in the country but I have no proof of that and I have only talked to 2 people ever who have owned a mts13. I bought the only one I could and the other belonged to someone who lives in Canada and had sold it a long time ago, as well as these rifles are banned from import so I would not have been able to buy that Mts13. Apparently these rifles are like ghosts even in Russia and I can't find any info or photos, heck the gun I bought was and is the only modern pictured rifle I can find at all. My story is that I have always had a copy of "Rifles of the world" that has a chapter under "USSR" that talks about the Margolin Rifles. I have always been into Russian rifles and my family is from the area around Tula in Russia so I have this fan boy thing for Tula firearms. I would just read everything I could about the Тульский оружейный завод and eventually I read in this book about these rifles(I circled the rifle entries in Pencil I wanted one so bad!). Tried forever to research about these rifles and some how I met Joe Leiper and if you want to know anything about Joe Leiper look here on GB because people here know him better than I. Joe apparently has really been around and Taught Biathlon in Russia. Since these rifles were made in the heart of Russian competition shooting, I guess it is only fitting for someone who taught competition shooting in Russia, to pick one up! I dont claim to know Joe's history but it is part of the rifles history too and Joe was a bit of a sage here on Gunboards so Im trying to give respect. I have read Tula eventually made a few similar rifles but in different forms but I cant find pictures anywhere, I read that part of its design became the MTS116 and then the Tula MTS116m Sniper. I hope I do the story justice and I didnt ramble too much!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I forgot to mention that the Mts12 and Mts13 have a set trigger and they can be set lower than 1oz.
 

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I forgot to mention that the Mts12 and Mts13 have a set trigger and they can be set lower than 1oz.
Thank you for the excellent information, additional research is warranted! And thank you for sharing these excellent firearms.
 

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Really interesting gun that I didn't know anything about. Thanks! Things like this are why I participate in the forum.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
found this in a random web page, Says that the Special forces use the MTS13 for sniper work. Sorry about the bad english,part doesnt translate right.



In the 1980's — early 1990's MTS13 used by some special forces as a sniper weapon, with all this without the help of other arrows installed on rifles different scopes. And to this day because of resource constraints, some special forces snipers work with MTS13. About it and says stuff about the Minsk seminar sniper pairs (October 2001) placed in the website "Notebook sniper": "In the midst Russian weapons of mass over (after SVD) was MC-13. C hybrid MC-13 — PSO- 1 I worked a couple of Ryazan. sight was mounted via an adapter on the side of the dovetail. Since the mounting location is actually on the level of the barrel axis of the sight was enough battened up. Because of that had to do an impromptu cheek quite an impressive size. "


Later, on the basis of MTS13 were developed random rifle MTS115 and MTS116 standard. In developing the MTS116 designers increased attention has been paid to the processing technology of the barrel, also changed the shape and size of the receiver. Locking is performed using the 2-bolt lugs and corresponding planes inside the receiver. Stress and disposition of descent, the length of the course and position of the trigger can be adjusted.


A couple of years back to order the Interior Ministry was created rifle MTS116-M. She initially designed as a sniper weapon, because fire is aimed at regular 7N1 sniper cartridges. The firing range is 600 meters. Locking is done similarly MTS116. The rifle has a removable magazine capacity of 5 or 10 rounds. The gun has open sights and can be equipped with different types of optical sights. The stock suitable for sporting guns shape, with adjustable feet for shoulder and cheek. In addition, the rifle comes in a set of flash suppressor reduces the flash shot.
But despite numerous advantages, MTS116-M has a very higher price comparable to the price of sporting rifle motivated. This greatly restricts its application.

http://survincity.com/2013/07/russian-cannon-sniping/
 

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Discussion Starter #15
So I know I talked about Margolin the man who did lots of work for the trigger work..... just thought you may be interested in reading about the man how made Tskib Soo and headed the design teams that was responsible for all the high quality rifles that I post about.

Ivan Mikhalev was born on August 27, 1909 in Tula. After graduating from school, nine-year-olds came to the Tula Arms Factory as a drawing artist. In 1930-1934 he studied at the Tula Mechanical Institute. Returning to the factory, he held the positions of designer on devices, senior designer, head of the group of designers.
During the Great Patriotic War he worked at the evacuated plant in Mednogorsk - first as the head of production, and from February 1943 - the chief engineer-deputy director of the plant.
In 1947 he was appointed chief and chief designer of the Central Design Research Bureau of Sports and Hunting Weapons (CCBC SOO).
During his leadership of the Central Committee, SOO has grown from a regional enterprise into the country's main organization in the field of sport-hunting weapons. With the direct participation of I.M. Mikhalev, such well-known models as sports pistols OF ICC 1, ICC 2, sports rifles OF ICC 12, ICC 13, ICC 70, sports and hunting rifles OF ICC 5, ICC 6, ICC 8, ICC 9, ICC 10, ICC 11, ICC 20, ICC 21 were created. Anti-tank grenade launchers RPG-7D, LNG-9, 2A28 Thunder, 2A30 and 9P132 Grad-P and Light rocket launchers have been developed for the army.
I.M. Mikhalev - Chevalier of the Order of Lenin (1962, 1969, 1971), Red Star (1942), Labour Red Banner (1944, 1976), Patriotic War II (1945), Honour Badge (1966), winner of three gold medals VDNH. In 1963 he was awarded the prize by S.I. Mosin, in 1971 - the title of "Hero of Socialist Labor", in 1980 the title of "Honorary Citizen of the City of Tula"
The designer died in Tula on May 18, 1988.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thank you, I have lots or respect for this man. If it wasn’t for him, I wouldn’t be doing what I do.
 
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