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I believe it can go to a museum on a form 10.. No real issues..the museum can never get rid of it unless to another museum and if they close? It goes to the atf
 

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if it was me, I would cut the receiver up, and sell the parts kit or build a semi from it. donate to a museum you won't get anything but a handshake. and there is no guarantee it will even go on display, could just get store in the back
 

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if it was me, I would cut the receiver up, and sell the parts kit or build a semi from it. donate to a museum you won't get anything but a handshake. and there is no guarantee it will even go on display, could just get store in the back
Or the unscrupulous take it out the back door.
 

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One minor detail about museums taking unregistered MG's or other NFA. They must be govt supported or owned in order to do this. A private museum has no more "right" to own contraband NFA than we do. Govt agencies can file form 10s but private ones can't. Form 10's are used for contraband firearms.....
If you have one of these museums in mind it is a good way to keep original guns intact, with their stories too if you have them. If its just a way to get rid of an illegal gun then chop the receiver as others noted and sell the parts to someone who needs them.

Frank
 

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Contact the Virginia War Memorial Foundation in Richmond, VA and ask for Jesse Smith. He's their head Curator and number two (three?) guy on the totem pole. He's intimately familiar with the process to register via Form 10 an unregistered MG and has done so multiple times in the past. I know for a fact he's saved well over a dozen unregistered MGs since I've known him.

He's definitely a "gun guy" and recognizes the historical value of these things. He's worked very hard to save many unregistered MGs from the cutting torch. Not only will he accept your MG on behalf of the museum and get it registered (via Form 10), but he'll also have the museum write you a receipt for a nice tax donation/deduction and list your name (if you want) on a placard on display with the gun.


The Virginia War Memorial Foundation is a museum and foundation dedicated to Virginia's War Dead. They are owned by the Commonwealth of Virginia and are eligible for this type of donation. They/Jesse Smith can be contacted at:
http://www.vawarmemorial.org/VAWM/default.aspx
http://www.vawarmemorial.org/vawm//View.aspx?page=contactus
or via phone at: 804.786.2060

Tell him Bill sent you.
 

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It sure would save a lot of aggravation if you could just pay 200 bucks and register an original unmessed with NFA item. The government would make money, they would know who has what. And the chances of them being used in a crime would disappear. I'd rather have a legal NFA item then a small tax deduction. They probably have some cap on what you can deduct anyway. An original numbers matching MP-40 is probably 20,000 dollars in todays market.
 

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It sure would save a lot of aggravation if you could just pay 200 bucks and register an original unmessed with NFA item. The government would make money, they would know who has what. And the chances of them being used in a crime would disappear. I'd rather have a legal NFA item then a small tax deduction. They probably have some cap on what you can deduct anyway. An original numbers matching MP-40 is probably 20,000 dollars in todays market.
The problem with your idea is that it makes too much sense and is efficient.
 

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So if someone happens to own a pristine MP35 with SS markings on it that came back God knows how, and remains in someones family, it could never be taken to the Feds to become legal to own? If not, I call BS on that.
 

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No machine gun has been added to the NFA registry since 1968 and none will ever be added. They called it a one time ever amnesty. Those who smuggled these machine guns home from Europe in 1945-46 broke federal and military law by doing so and they knew it. The fact that these men are now dead or dying doesn't change the law. The owners of the smuggled machine guns had an ADVERTISED amnesty period and chose to take no action.

I agree that there should be a way to "legalize" these guns but it will never happen. The Department of the Treasury doesn't care about SS stamps.
 

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Actually no new MGs for Citizen use has been added to the registry since 1986, not 1968. Perhaps you made a error jennymikeb ?
The Amnesty in 1968 only was for 30 days, Congress actually authorized 90 day amnesty IIRC.So, in theory we could have 60 days of amnesty left. Of course theory is not reality.

You are also incorrect that the MGs brought home from WWII were all "smuggled". Prior to 1968 you could own a Deactivated MG. Usually that meant the bolt was removed and the chamber had a steel plug welded in place. Some were "deactivated " more than others. Am aware of some WWII vets(officers) bringing home MGs that were considered "deactivated" by the military by simple removal of the bolt.

Of course all these guns needed to be registered in 1968 to be legal today.
 

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Actually no new MGs for Citizen use has been added to the registry since 1986, not 1968. Perhaps you made a error jennymikeb ?
The Amnesty in 1968 only was for 30 days, Congress actually authorized 90 day amnesty IIRC.So, in theory we could have 60 days of amnesty left. Of course theory is not reality.

You are also incorrect that the MGs brought home from WWII were all "smuggled". Prior to 1968 you could own a Deactivated MG. Usually that meant the bolt was removed and the chamber had a steel plug welded in place. Some were "deactivated " more than others. Am aware of some WWII vets(officers) bringing home MGs that were considered "deactivated" by the military by simple removal of the bolt.

Of course all these guns needed to be registered in 1968 to be legal today.
I agree 100% but a WWII mp-40 that's been in the USA since WWII and missed the amnesty in '68 should have a way to be accepted into the registry. That's the problem we face.What I don't like about the form 10 if you read it. They will look back at the registry and if it's a legal gun that has no paperwork that the owner can find. It's status is changes to form 10 and it's no longer transferable (ever). They won't tell you if it is or ever was registered.
 

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In 1943 all the services issued a circular advising that no MGs were allowed to be returned to the US by GIs as war trophies which was in response to the NFA1934. The issue was simply that too many MGs w coming into the US that wouldn't be registered as required b law. In 1945 the Official DEWAT program was started by the military in conjunction with the ATTU, treasury at the time, and there was an initial protocol that was spelled out on how to deactivate an MG correctly. This involved steel rod electric arc welding of the chamber, and the barrel to the receiver. The deactivation was supposed to be supervised by a federal agent and the owner was issued an affidavit listing serial and make of the gun, and listing his name and address and indicating that the gun was properly deactivated and signed by the agent. Disabling an MG by removing the bolt was not acceptable as a form of deactivation.
MGs came into the US in many different ways including by form 6 import, some registered on form 1s, mailed and shipped and carried. Generally, from what I recall talking to vets of WWII over many years, the MGs were not regarded as a threat and having one that was unregistered was a low level problem. In the town that I grew up it here were half a dozen MGs in the neighborhood, none registered of course.
After the commercial exploitation of DEWATs, from the early 1950s to about 1957, the public was roused by a numb of articles in Life and other periodicals revealing that DEWATs were being reactivated by their owns and. Creating "crime". Of course, this was completely bogus and just served as an excuse to close down the DEWAT program and scare the outfits that were importing MGs and welding them up. Many were registered and eventually the GCA '68 came along and the Amnesty provided a 30 day opportunity to register MGs without any consequences. Many thousands were registered and of course many were not. I was in college at the time and knew quite a few owners of unregistered MGs who were afraid of taking the in, fearing the amnesty was a trick. Too bad, it was not a trick and we lost a lot of them to that fear.
Since the legislation in of GCA '68 did not address and prohibit manufacture of MGs under federal laws, an 18 year window remained open for registration of MGs for private possession, a major stoke of luck. Payback came in thE guise of the Hughes amendment in Ma of '86 where MG owners were thrown to the wolves by a corrupt vote. Such is life.

Bob Naess
 

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Bob's post sums it up pretty well, in facts and in spirit.

A friend of mine has an MG-42 that was sent back from Europe on a period "Form 6" dated 1946, that lists the soldier's rank and unit, as well as all of the gun information. It was gently dewatted and life went on. All manner of guns came home, some made it to the amnesty, and some didn't. How well was it advertised? I didn't live through it, so I can't say, but like anything else in life, I'm sure it varied by location.
 

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So if someone happens to own a pristine MP35 with SS markings on it that came back God knows how, and remains in someones family, it could never be taken to the Feds to become legal to own? If not, I call BS on that.
Funny you should mention that particular gun..... I had a family here in MN with an immaculate MP-35 with SS runes all matching with a nice magazine and original sling. Brought back by the father, who was a captain in the Army in Europe. Never registered. They contacted the local BATF office, and were told "contraband". I found out about it because I was in contact with a BTF agent here on another matter, and he helped get the gun donated to the State Military Museum on a form 10. I actually met him at a local PD to pick the weapon up to transport it .
If there is no paperwork to demonstrate registration then the gun is considered contraband. the advantage to donating the gun is that the family can receive a receipt for a tax deductible donation, and in some cases saving a rare or historic firearm.
 
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