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I spent part of a summer hauling silage to fill a trench silo.
During a break one day my cousins and I messed around with a cheap .22 single shot bolt gun. I think it was a Stevens.
It had a crack running the length of the barrel. I could not believe they shot the thing but they used it for short range pests.

Later in my work life I ran into to similar flaws in bar stock and plate.
One of the worst I saw was 6061-T6 aluminum plate that had a delamination issue.

One of the shop personnel sawed hundreds of blanks out of 3/4" plate and dropped one on the floor.
The book size slab of aluminum split into 2 thinner plates due to a seam down the middle of the material.
The result was the aluminum mill had to send out a technician with an ultrasonic tester to go through all the blanks and find those with the material defects.
 

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I'd bet it's out of warranty. Save a stamp!!!
:laugh:


In 55 years of shooting guns,I have never seen anything like that. One for the books. Gun steel is FLEXIBLE, it has to be or it would burst or.......crack.
I too would contact Mossberg. They would want to know about this.
 

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In my experience as a barrel maker, I have seen barrel-quality bar stock, both CM and stainless, with a 'seam' or 'pipe' of slag running the entire length of the bar, but usually centered in the material and not evident until the bore is drilled. The condition is caused in manufacture, usually at the beginning of a run, when some dross remains in the molten steel: when this is extruded and rolled into round stock, the dross winds-up in the middle, and, if the pipe is too large to be removed in drilling and reaming, is left visible in the bore. If not detected, a remaining seam of such material would constitute a stress riser, which could result in a full-length crack, either in proof or later as more stress accumulates with continued use. To leave such a seam undetected in a finished barrel would be very rare, however. I had only one barrel out of perhaps a thousand in which a seam remained undetected through rifling and lapping, and, when it was noted, the barrel was scrapped. In any case, when such a condition was detected, it was always cause for scrapping the material. I have never seen such a condition as appears in this Mossberg in a finished and installed barrel.

PRD1 - mhb - MIke
 
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