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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Something new constantly. I was thinking crest would be large and obvious.
A small detail to look for. Interesting reading of it's history. Amazing what you gents know!

View attachment 4063973
A bit of a side note, there is a plaque in New Orleans about Louis Kossuth, for who the crest came be. Stumbled across it while taking my Dad, an old 82nd guy, to the WW2 Museum for the 70th D-Day celebration.
Leaf Font Grass Commemorative plaque Rectangle
 

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Brother Miller Tyme,
There are some other interesting markings from the post-WWII era (but probably not from after the 1956 Uprising) placed on Vz.24 and K98k Mauser rifles and Hungarian 43M rifles. They're very likely specific to the Rendörség, the Hungarian Police.

I wonder if these Kossuth crest Mosins were supplied by the USSR for the nascent post-WWII Hungarian Honvéd? There were tons of usable rifles left over after WWII, but reliance on Comm Bloc arms and ammunition would have tied them closer in dependence to the Soviets.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·

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A bit off topic but there is a street in Columbus , Ohio named after a Hungarian immigrant., Louis Kossuth

 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Actually mine isn't a PU but a plain service rifle. I had posted it in this thread: Kossuth crested Ishevsk M.91/30 service rifle from 1943

Addendum: seems interesting those that are non-PU carry the stamp on the receiver whereas the PU rifles have it on the barrel shank.
Thanks for the correction Dave, made the change on the post sir.
Yes on the 91/30's you would be correct, but on my M44 it is on the tip of the Izhevsk arsenal stamp.
 

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What ever it was applied for it is very uncommon, and on 4 PU snipers I am aware of here in the U.S. they are all 1943 Izhevsk PU’s of the same prefix, “BT”. According to long time member Alb87 he had documented ½ a dozen so stamped firearms over in Europe with one being a deactivated Tula PU sniper and another a PPSH41
After giving it some thought, I'm very certain the rarity of these is surely not [only] because they are so rare, but much more due to the fact they are so small and unknown to most (I wasn't aware of it myself, it was a friend who had pointed it out to me). Your thread and re-posting these again and again every time one turns up makes the collecting world more aware of it and therefore will result in more turning up.
 
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