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I love hunting with my PU Sniper. It was my primary rifle last winter, but I never got a shot at any deer. This might have been a good thing, because I dont know if I ever could have worked the safety in time, especially when it was super cold and I lost dexterity in my hands. I still want to use it again, but the safety issue needs to be mended. I've been looking at cocking knob modifications that add an easy to grip ring, and I wanted to know anyone's opinion on them. I see the expensive Brass Stacker one is a clamp on. Does anyone have any experience with them?
 

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Most of us do not use a safety. Don't put a round in the chamber till needed. . . if you want really safe. For almost safe .. . . put one in the chamber and just don't lock the bolt down to the side till ready to shoot. If you must add a ring just get a extra bolt knob, don't alter the matching one on your gun.
 

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I saw one of the ring bolt safeties in use -the solid welded ring kind, not the slip-on variety. It actually worked pretty well, gave a better grip by far and seemed pretty much a hunting improvement. Quiet and surprisingly rather useful.

As said, save the original.

Also, check your firing pin protrusion with the screwdriver gauge after the swap so you are sure you don't pierce a primer or fail to get a shot off from a misfire.
 

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Somebody needs to ask Caribou how Agnes deals with the safeties on her M39 and on her 91-30PU up in Alaska.

I don't think you are going to get any better or more practical information than they can give you.
 

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Maybe 10 to 12 years ago I needed a rifle for some specific tasks and chose a mosin , scoped it and found a ring of some sort laying on a garage floor. Welded half of it or so on and worked great.
Has not come off but I think you'd be able to rip it off if you chose to do so.

 

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Ive hunted with a Mosin for over 25 years with no issue. One learn how to use the safety or two chamber when you need it. Problem solved.
 

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Its one thing if you are stationary in a blind. You could leave the action open until you needed it and quietly load a round. Otherwise l concur with what Vic mentioned. I was going to also say to become familiar with how the knob safety operates either with or without gloves. Or use your finger as a safety. But if you were moving with it with a ring, or just practice unslinging from shoulder and disengaging the safety without a ring l would still think it would take the same amount of time to disengage it. It would be quieter though than operating the bolt to load a round.
 

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Rifle safeties ARE NOT SAFE. I don't know of any with a positive firing pin block like some handgun safeties. Those handguns like the 1911 models that don't have a firing pin block and are carried cocked and locked require a lot of expertise and attention to condition, the reason the military required empty chamber carry.

So carry a Mosin with an empty chamber, PLEASE.
 

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If one does not have the choice of using a better suited rifle for deer hunting, do as Vic stated.

If the Mosin is all you got, the ring may be enhance safety and for cold (or old ) fingers, far easier to use.

Let safety drive how you solve this: not collector issues.
 

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The Mosin-Nagant safety can be practiced over and over until it becomes easier. Admittedly with dry and warm fingers.

The Mosin-Nagant safety is positive insofar as when applied:
"pulling back and turning the cocking piece ... a) The cocking nose on the cocking piece is turned out of contact with the sear--hence a trigger pull cannot affect it. (b) The striker has been turned so that if it were possible for it to slip it could not hit the cartridge primer [Hence, I do not understand our friend and site contributor jjk308's point that "I don't know of any with a positive firing pin block"], because the flat surfaces at its forward end are turned out of line with the corresponding surfaces inside the connecting bar cylinder through which the striker must pass to hit the primer. (c) The lug on the underside of the cocking piece exxtension is locked into a cut in the rear of the bolt to prevent any forward movement. (d) The long cocking piece extension is turned to the rear of the cut in the receiver bridge, hence cannot move forward since the receiver bridge is in its path."

A difficult-to-apply but very effective safety mechanism, unlike, say, Soviet semi-autos like the SVT-40 and SKS that just employed a trigger block.

When I take my 1891/59 afield to try to do my part to cull the feral hog varmints here in Texas, I'll be using a no-gunsmithing ring safety, although I'm reasonably confident I can take the safety on and off without the aid.
 

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The Mosin-Nagant safety can be practiced over and over until it becomes easier. Admittedly with dry and warm fingers.

The Mosin-Nagant safety is positive insofar as when applied:
"pulling back and turning the cocking piece ... a) The cocking nose on the cocking piece is turned out of contact with the sear--hence a trigger pull cannot affect it. (b) The striker has been turned so that if it were possible for it to slip it could not hit the cartridge primer [Hence, I do not understand our friend and site contributor jjk308's point that "I don't know of any with a positive firing pin block"], because the flat surfaces at its forward end are turned out of line with the corresponding surfaces inside the connecting bar cylinder through which the striker must pass to hit the primer. (c) The lug on the underside of the cocking piece exxtension is locked into a cut in the rear of the bolt to prevent any forward movement. (d) The long cocking piece extension is turned to the rear of the cut in the receiver bridge, hence cannot move forward since the receiver bridge is in its path."

A difficult-to-apply but very effective safety mechanism, unlike, say, Soviet semi-autos like the SVT-40 and SKS that just employed a trigger block.

When I take my 1891/59 afield to try to do my part to cull the feral hog varmints here in Texas, I'll be using a no-gunsmithing ring safety, although I'm reasonably confident I can take the safety on and off without the aid.
Even so, if the firing pin decides to break forward of the cocking piece, or if the threads on the two parts are 'iffy' EVEN WITH the cocking piece turned there would be nothing stopping the firing pin from hitting the primer. I know, these are not likely failures, but stranger things HAVE happened.

P38's have safeties that should ALWAYS work, too, but they HAVE been known to fail.

Safeties are better than nothing, but I ALWAYS consider them half measures.
 

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One learn how to use the safety or two chamber when you need it. Problem solved.
+1

I still hunt with mine and have no problems with that safety.

The trouble is that people try to pull and twist the safety with their hand. Instead, hold the safety and pull/twist the rifle with your other hand. No problem. It's actually easier with gloves than without them if you do it that way, as the glove pads the fingers.

It's possible with mittens even, though I don't recommended it.
 

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Ronbo6: Yes, yes, "Murphy's Law" and all that. A Mosin-Nagant firing pin "decides to break?" Srsly? If a firing pin had damage, pitting, flaws of some kind, etc. then yes. In conceding your point, allow me to interject that if somebody re-assembled a Mosin-Nagant rifle bolt with a badly damaged firing pin that could "break" under the pressure exerted by the main-spring, that any resultant discharge would be "negligent" and not "accidental." Should thr resultant discharge cause damage to life or limb, it would be due to negligence and failure to observe proper safety.

Reverend Mauser: Yes, good advice. I find that bracing the butt stock in the elbow also greatly assists the process.
 

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Most of us do not use a safety. Don't put a round in the chamber till needed. . . if you want really safe. For almost safe .. . . put one in the chamber and just don't lock the bolt down to the side till ready to shoot. If you must add a ring just get a extra bolt knob, don't alter the matching one on your gun.
Also, I dismantle the entire bolt, to assure the firing pin and the bolt bore are smooth and clean (light spin of bolt in a cordless drill, against 600 grit emery paper, with oil).

I adjust the firing spring to get the safety into a reasonable pull.
I cut the spring about 2 to 3 turns, heat it in a propane torch for 1 to 2 seconds, and pass the end against a file, while hot.

I also tune it all to get about a 5 pound trigger pull. Clean well, of any abrasive grit, then, coat with light oil.
 

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+1

I still hunt with mine and have no problems with that safety.

The trouble is that people try to pull and twist the safety with their hand. Instead, hold the safety and pull/twist the rifle with your other hand. No problem. It's actually easier with gloves than without them if you do it that way, as the glove pads the fingers.

It's possible with mittens even, though I don't recommended it.
Yep thats the trick. You pull back on the safety and let the rifle do the work with the twist. Doing this and its not bad.
 
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