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I was re-reading a copy of Hatchers notebook recently, he makes next to no mention of the Mosin rifle. I was curious about the strength of the Mosin receiver and/or composition of the steel used in it. Has anyone heard of a Mosin bursting?
I am sure that the breeching of a rimmed case is more uniform than a semi rim case that may have some portion of the case not fully enclosed; but, I have not seen any mention of a burst Mosin. Or at least I can not remember such a thing.
Case failure is one thing, receiver failure is quite another.

Hatcher makes quite a chapter on steel composition for American rifles, what type steel is used in Mosin Nagants? Probably the axle of a truck or salvaged steel from another country, but I am rather curious.
 

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I remember seeing old posts of someone who purposely tried to blow up a M27 IIRC, I have seen an old post or two of a MN action that failed, fellow had a bloody hand. A post or two that showed a cracked receiver that most likely would have resulted in failure.

Generally, the MN receivers are very reliable....I have never had a problem in 15 years or so.

Pahtu.
 

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Just look up the video on youtube of the two yokels trying to blow one up. All they do is get the bolt stuck from overpressure and the extractor rips off the bolt head when he hammers the bolt open. Never seen an example of one blow up.
 

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Can't remember where I read it but they tested stronger than Mauser 98 and 03A3 receivers.
 

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what type steel is used in Mosin Nagants? Probably the axle of a truck or salvaged steel from another country, but I am rather curious.
Rather poor attemp to be funny. There is absolutely nothing wrong in the steel used in Mosins or any other Russian/Soviet weapons. They are often crude. But they will last and last and last. And do their job.

The Civil War era receivers have been debated but I still have not seen the Truth about those being not firm enough either.
 

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Can't remember where I read it but they tested stronger than Mauser 98 and 03A3 receivers.
I've discussed this a couple times before. The Mauser bolt locks up at the 12 and 6 o'clock position. The upper lug, which is cut through for the ejector, is backed by the upper part of the receiver ring. The lower lug has less steel behind it because it is milled away to form the feed ramp. Paul Mauser saw this potential weakness and added the safety lug in the Model 98 receiver. The Mosin Nagant bolt locks up at 9 and 3 o'clock. The left bolt lug is backed by the entire length of the receiver. The right lug is backed by about as much receiver ring steel as the Mauser's upper lug, but of course does not have its structure compromised by an ejector slot. Behind the right lug is the massive bolt rib, which doubles as a 3d safety lug.
 

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A friend of mine who lives in Eastern Finland rebarreled a M-91/30 in 300 Winchester Mag. He claims that it fired ok as a single shot rifle.
The steel used with most military rifles of that era was just carbon steel and a little manganese to make the steel a little tougher.
 

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Leon is pretty spot on with his assessment. And the post that details a failure is correct about there being a previous crack that propagated through the receiver. The discoloration, more appropriately, the corrosion shows this. If you look at the picture that shows this discoloration, you'll actually see the "beachheads"
These represent the progress of the crack. As a result, there was really 3 times the crack progressed through the cross section. The final "shiny" portion was the site of the ultimate failure. Pretty amazing to see that the failure finally happened after about 80-90% of the receiver structural integrity had been compromised.

Cracks initiate by many means. Some cracks are not even noticeable unless there is a dye penetrant test, radiography, or other means. It's quite possible he didn't even see the initial crack, which would have been the largest.
 

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How do you measure strength? Bubba tests don't count for much.

The three-line receiver was made of Сталь 40, see equivalents here: http://metallicheckiy-portal.ru/marki_metallov/stk/40 Certain areas were hardened to 29-41 HRC.

As far as "cannot be blown", see some WWII German pictures:
 

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"She is made of iron, sir. I assure you, she can sink. It is a mathematical certainty."

^ Above can be said for any receiver; just replace sink with "blow up".
 

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"She is made of iron, sir. I assure you, she can sink. It is a mathematical certainty."

^ Above can be said for any receiver; just replace sink with "blow up".
Nah... Have you ever seen a blown up Mannlicher M.95 or M.88? Mannlicher über alles!
 

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Just look up the video on youtube of the two yokels trying to blow one up. All they do is get the bolt stuck from overpressure and the extractor rips off the bolt head when he hammers the bolt open. Never seen an example of one blow up.
Here it is: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Bzls73WH7w


This guy is very well-known in interwebz land when it comes to MNs.
 

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Here it is: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Bzls73WH7w


This guy is very well-known in interwebz land when it comes to MNs.
Blah




If he ever reads this: iraqivertern8888856324290 or whatever this next statement is to you:

Bro, pick a side! You either respect military surplus or you hack them up and destroy them.. you can't have it both ways. You will please neither persuasion the way you are going.
 

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Blah




If he ever reads this: iraqivertern8888856324290 or whatever this next statement is to you:

Bro, pick a side! You either respect military surplus or you hack them up and destroy them.. you can't have it both ways. You will please neither persuasion the way you are going.
He seems goofy, but he does have some really informative videos about MNs, like how to fix a sticky bolt, etc. Personally, I think intentionally trying to blow up/destroy an old rifle is just wrong, even if it's just a $140 rifle. I am always amazed at the things people do to nice rifles that turn them into junk.
 
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