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Nothing stronger than stiff nylon with solvent. I use my 20 gauge brush and drill on every new Mosin I get, especially gunked up T53s. Stainless Steel on carbon steel...YIKES not good! IF you follow with a swab, be sure all the lint is out.
 

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I've never had good results cleaning anything but my teeth with nylon brushes.
Bronze is way softer than any steel, and will do no harm. Much better at removing stubborn crud.
Stainless steel brushes (not the tornado kind) are wonderful for pitted/dark Mosin bores. Wouldn't use them in the chamber though.

50 cal. brush size works. Has standard 8-32 threads.
20 ga. brushes typically have the much bigger thread size. Depends on what cleaning rod you have. There are adapters available.
I use one section of an aluminum rod chucked into my cordless drill, for 30 seconds or so. Repeat as needed.
.45 cal jag with a patch is just right for a final wipe. I don't think lint will hurt anything. Pet hair sure doesn't. :)

Welcome.
 

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I bought two great Swedish Army .30 cleaning kits with brass-bound aluminum sectional cleaning rods with brass spacers and a variety of bronze brushes and jag. Work great.

Mostly I clean with an endless series of Hoppe's-soaked patches after a warm water soaking-wet Boresnake. (No, I'm not trying to open the Monstrous Door To The Great Cleaning Debate!)
 

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I bought two great Swedish Army .30 cleaning kits with brass-bound aluminum sectional cleaning rods with brass spacers and a variety of bronze brushes and jag. Work great.

Mostly I clean with an endless series of Hoppe's-soaked patches after a warm water soaking-wet Boresnake. (No, I'm not trying to open the Monstrous Door To The Great Cleaning Debate!)
Staying away from the Great Corrosive Debate, I love the smell of Hoppe's #9 in the morning. For a chamber brush, I too generally use a .50 caliber brush from my muzzle loading kit. Recently I picked up an 8mm chamber brush for $2,59 from my LGS. I may give that a whirl, so to speak. I use bronze brushes too, since nylon ones just seem nice for a quick clean between long firing strings. But they do have their place.

I have sparingly used a Tornado brush liberally soaked in Hoppe's on the occasion when I got a milsurp in that had not been cleaned at all for years and a couple of passes of that seemed to have loosened up the crud enough for the bronze ones to get most of it out. No way I would use one regularly, but it didn't seem destructive for what I was doing with it. One rifle in particular stands out. It is a 1923 91-30 that is counterbored and had about the roughest bore of any of my Mosins when I got it. I figured I sure couldn't hurt it any more than it was already hurt. After a good scrubbing, soaking in lithium grease for a week, and then cleaning again (with a bronze brush and patches) it's now one of my better shooting Mosins, and I am getting under 2 inch groups from it at a hundred.

Maybe that Tornado brush just knocked off the edges of the pitting, lol. But - it seemed to make a shooter out of a wallhanger.
 

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Tried the 'Tornado' brushes a couple of times. Rounded wire 'edges' don't have much in the way of scrubbing power.
It's the sharp ends of the wires that dig into the crud and get into the corners of the rifling grooves.
No ends = rubbing/burnishing action only. Not what I want.
Have heard that gunsmiths like them because they last forever (from gunsmiths). But through cleaning isn't what they're after.

The 'standard' type stainless steel brushes I've only seen available at gunshows. Give one a try on a rough bore (.35 caliber).
They last many times longer than bronze ones, which can be eaten to uselessness in a dozen passes thru a rough Mosin bore.
Have never seen any damage to a bore after using the stainless ones, and I use them a lot.
Stainless steel is softer than carbon steel. Check the strength figures for bolts.
 

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I am currently doing a bore clean-up on a 1933 Izhevsk 91-30 (with a double-dated, recycled, 1917 Tula receiver) that I picked up about ten days ago. I have been using .35 caliber stainless steel brushes on it, with no evidence yet of damage to the lands. In my experience, brass brushes don't seem to do jack for this type of work.

I am currently using my second such steel brush on this particular rifle. The 'fuzzy track of smut' in the grooves is getting visibly smaller and it starts a bit further down the bore with every cleaning session. I figure if I continue as I have been doing (and don't shoot it in the meantime), I will have a very nice, clean, shiny bore sometime between Thanksgiving and Christmas. :crossfingers:

While patching out and brushing the bore I tend to swap around a lot between Hoppe's no.9, Gunzilla, Kroil, GI bore cleaner, Paint Thinner, Brake/Carburetor Cleaner, foaming bore cleaners, and whatever else I happen to have handy at the time as cleaning solutions.

Each time I change 'formulas' it seems that I usually get 3 or 4 darker patches before they fade, and it becomes time for me to switch to a different formula again. My best guess is that each cleaning compound I use is maybe just a little bit better at dissolving certain different compounds found in the crud in the bore that it comes in contact with, and switching the compounds as new, fresh, crud gets exposed explains these changes.

I have also tried the .38 caliber stainless steel pistol brushes for this type of work, but I have found they are not built nearly as rugged as the rifle brushes, and in my experience the pistol brushes are not tough enough to do the heavy scrubbing that dirty Mosin bores typically seem to need.
 

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(I bought two great Swedish Army .30 cleaning kits with brass-bound aluminum sectional cleaning rods with brass spacers and a variety of bronze brushes and jag. Work great.)

I think that you may be referring to the Swiss STG 57 cleaning kits.
 

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For a few really bad chambers I made a fitted dowel wooden plug that I then covered with a fine emery cloth wrap. After spinning that by hand in the camber for a fairly long time, changing the emery cloth as needed, the chamber was spotless and everything ejected without sticking. Took out a whole lot of brown and black grunge!
The other chamber super-clean is to put your bronze brush in an electric drill with an extension shaft and buzz away at fairly low speed with some gun oil or Hoppe's added to keep it from running dry.
Also, get a very bright light and shine it down into the chamber, letting you use a dentist's pick or bent wire to scratch out collected crud on the right side, which may affect ejection function.
 

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Stainless steel is pretty soft. Not sure what harm there would be to use one to clean a bore or chamber of a heat treated barrel/chamber on a rifle. Have used plenty of stainless brushes on all kinds of guns to clean them. Never noticed anything detrimental.
 

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(I bought two great Swedish Army .30 cleaning kits with brass-bound aluminum sectional cleaning rods with brass spacers and a variety of bronze brushes and jag. Work great.)

I think that you may be referring to the Swiss STG 57 cleaning kits.
I was thinking the same thing, but the bit about the ALUMINUM rods threw me. The STG57 kits have steel rods.
 
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