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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Scored this rifle today at an auction. I don't know what year it was made, sometime between 1956 and 1960. The auction house was not sure of the caliber, maybe a 270 Win. This rifle will make a nice pairing with my 1903 M-S.
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Like your style CT! Did you 'steal' this one? Based on "information-not" category, seems likely to deter many bidders. That perhaps suggesting "Don't give a S***" auction service and seller!!! Below, some MS era info should you be interested; with pardon if you're MS knowledgeable.
Mannlicher Schönauer (aka MS) receiver ring date nomenclature reflects "Mod." followed by four digit year, Such, Steyr manufacturer's method of designating successive rifle Models by intro year. Happily, the two digit year/mfg code is easily visible on receiver ring left. (Some earlier models, on barrel-aft breech area left.) Yours most likely Stoeger marked on floor plate as the firm were exclusive US importers for MS throughout fifties-early seventies era. Where such era MS rifles in States without Stoeger nomenclature, often a Europe stationed GI purchased bring-back.
Access to any Stoeger era catalogs will provide most US destined, authoritative if basic, info including US chamberings. A decade after high production costs killed the Winchester "pre '64" model 70, the same cause forcing demise of these great MS 'breed' in original sporting format!
I'm with a couple of 1956 Model MS full stock carbines, one in 270 Win. Also, straight comb European-style half stock MS rifle in 30-06. Model of "1952", but barrel mfg date of "57"! It without Stoeger markings. Believe it's original and intended for the European market where 30-06 also highly popular! The 1956 Model appears very much built for the American market!
Congrats on your great purchase. Hope to view some great pix after getting in your hands and allowing some reasonable "foreplay" time :) :) :) !
Best & Stay Safe!
John
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Like your style CT! Did you 'steal' this one? Based on "information-not" category, seems likely to deter many bidders. That perhaps suggesting "Don't give a S***" auction service and seller!!! Below, some MS era info should you be interested; with pardon if you're MS knowledgeable.
Mannlicher Schönauer (aka MS) receiver ring date nomenclature reflects "Mod." followed by four digit year, Such, Steyr manufacturer's method of designating successive rifle Models by intro year. Happily, the two digit year/mfg code is easily visible on receiver ring left. (Some earlier models, on barrel-aft breech area left.) Yours most likely Stoeger marked on floor plate as the firm were exclusive US importers for MS throughout fifties-early seventies era. Where such era MS rifles in States without Stoeger nomenclature, often a Europe stationed GI purchased bring-back.
Access to any Stoeger era catalogs will provide most US destined, authoritative if basic, info including US chamberings. A decade after high production costs killed the Winchester "pre '64" model 70, the same cause forcing demise of these great MS 'breed' in original sporting format!
I'm with a couple of 1956 Model MS full stock carbines, one in 270 Win. Also, straight comb European-style half stock MS rifle in 30-06. Model of "1952", but barrel mfg date of "57"! It without Stoeger markings. Believe it's original and intended for the European market where 30-06 also highly popular! The 1956 Model appears very much built for the American market!
Congrats on your great purchase. Hope to view some great pix after getting in your hands and allowing some reasonable "foreplay" time :) :) :) !
Best & Stay Safe!
John
After digging around the web, I got this rifle pretty cheap, 902 bucks delivered. It took me awhile to find out exactly what the rifle was. I finally found the info sheet on M-S rifles which gave me a good idea what it was. This rifle will make a nice pairing with the 1903 carbine I already have. 270 is a nice cartridge. I hope that is what it is. The two photos I posted are all the auction house posted so I don't know what year it was made. At least I know that model was made between 1956 and 1960. I do have the Gun Digest with the chapter on M-S rifles. Now to find out where it is. The only disappointment is the rifle doesn't have the double trigger. If it had, it would have sold much higher I am sure. There was another M-S rifle in the auction. I don't know what it sold for. In another auction, they had a nice 1908 carbine listed. The prebidding had it at 1400 bucks. Too rich for me. chris
 

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Well... You're keeping me in suspense! :) Just my opine, the most common chambering for the 1956 Stoeger imports was predictably 30-06, followed by 243 Win and 270 Win third. The '56 Model was a mixed bag due to the stock design. Believe it didn't go over well at all in Europe and perhaps that's the root cause of my non-Stoger 52 design as referenced with '57 production. I believe the radical butt stock was something you either loved or hated. For me, simply a radical contrast between Continental-old and Roy Weatherby new. Other hand, with a scope, the ergonomics were quite good - again for me personally. Putting the eye more centered behind the scope. Don't know what a southpaw would do though!
My personal MS group includes: Pre Great War: Bubba modified to half stock M1903, metal & chambering all original. Bought cheap! (Others all original:) Model 1905, 9x56 MS. Post WWII, modern era MS: M1950, late production with swept bolt handle, 257 Roberts. M1952, 7x57, with unusual -no drill - Lyman 36 receiver sight, the half stock M1952 previously referenced, the 2 M1956 in 270 & 243 - both single triggers; a couple of MCA models which, interestingly, abandoned the 1956 stock design, returning to a more conventional-sedate format. Chamberings 30-06 & 243 Win, latter with double triggers. Whew!
Particularly after the '52 Model, the double trigger became increasingly rare. With the possible exception of .243, American hunting more mobile, less often with 'fixed stand'.
These were great rifles and a bit astounding how long to endure with complex if svelte MS action format! That particularly in context of their complex design! The rotary magazine design also shared with the Savage Model 1899 & 99, likely a bugger of machining & fitting up. Consider different carrier assemblies for each chambering! MS answer in pushing the model to end of sixties era, price increases. The MS in America always bit of exotic rifle and Stoeger perhaps better positioned in marketing such nationwide than about anyone else. A good blend with Steyr... Until the music stopped!

Congrats on your "new child"! Your twin orbs were certainly bigger than mine considering the degree of unknowns! :) But the price does seem good! For info...
The bolts were numbered to the receiver on handle underside & of course matching numbers best assurance of proper headspace too. After visual inspection I'd cautiously test-run some rounds through the action for loading/feeding/extraction/ejection cycle. The nemesis of these guns is rechambering & woes to follow. But that's also quite rare too, at least where originally in popular American chamberings!

Hope you'll return again with some good centerfold quality MS porn! :)
Best & Stay Safe!
John
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well... You're keeping me in suspense! :) Just my opine, the most common chambering for the 1956 Stoeger imports was predictably 30-06, followed by 243 Win and 270 Win third. The '56 Model was a mixed bag due to the stock design. Believe it didn't go over well at all in Europe and perhaps that's the root cause of my non-Stoger 52 design as referenced with '57 production. I believe the radical butt stock was something you either loved or hated. For me, simply a radical contrast between Continental-old and Roy Weatherby new. Other hand, with a scope, the ergonomics were quite good - again for me personally. Putting the eye more centered behind the scope. Don't know what a southpaw would do though!
My personal MS group includes: Pre Great War: Bubba modified to half stock M1903, metal & chambering all original. Bought cheap! (Others all original:) Model 1905, 9x56 MS. Post WWII, modern era MS: M1950, late production with swept bolt handle, 257 Roberts. M1952, 7x57, with unusual -no drill - Lyman 36 receiver sight, the half stock M1952 previously referenced, the 2 M1956 in 270 & 243 - both single triggers; a couple of MCA models which, interestingly, abandoned the 1956 stock design, returning to a more conventional-sedate format. Chamberings 30-06 & 243 Win, latter with double triggers. Whew!
Particularly after the '52 Model, the double trigger became increasingly rare. With the possible exception of .243, American hunting more mobile, less often with 'fixed stand'.
These were great rifles and a bit astounding how long to endure with complex if svelte MS action format! That particularly in context of their complex design! The rotary magazine design also shared with the Savage Model 1899 & 99, likely a bugger of machining & fitting up. Consider different carrier assemblies for each chambering! MS answer in pushing the model to end of sixties era, price increases. The MS in America always bit of exotic rifle and Stoeger perhaps better positioned in marketing such nationwide than about anyone else. A good blend with Steyr... Until the music stopped!

Congrats on your "new child"! Your twin orbs were certainly bigger than mine considering the degree of unknowns! :) But the price does seem good! For info...
The bolts were numbered to the receiver on handle underside & of course matching numbers best assurance of proper headspace too. After visual inspection I'd cautiously test-run some rounds through the action for loading/feeding/extraction/ejection cycle. The nemesis of these guns is rechambering & woes to follow. But that's also quite rare too, at least where originally in popular American chamberings!

Hope you'll return again with some good centerfold quality MS porn! :)
Best & Stay Safe!
John
Thank you for all the information on these rifles. There was another 1956 rifle at the auction. It had an aftermarket stock with some beautiful carvings on it. I did not go for it because it was not original. 270 Win is a new caliber for me. I will have to look for some dies and components to work up some loads. I am a long time handloader. Primers are not to be found lately so I will have to visit Cablea's for some PPU in 270. PPU makes good reloadable brass. I haven't hunted in many years but with these two beautiful rifles, I may have to hunt one more time. That will happen at my summer home in MI. Lots of deer around the house there. The longest shot would be about 25 yards. That is from the kitchen window. I will post some photos when I get the rifle, probably next week. chris
 

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First please; you don't need to thank me! Your expertise in the shotgun arena has greatly helped me!
I'm really looking forward to some pix of the new MS. I'm also with you on declining the other '56 both on your basis of non-originality & carvings as described. These three-fourths century duration MS model rifles definitely - ARE collectibles! That nowadays first with utilitarian aspects 'there' for sure but definite second. When they fall off the "conductibility" cliff, a lot of value lost! Such my 1903 model fate & purchased at such discounted price accorded!
As generalization, can do with some tasteful stock carving, such as scroll checkering-border work, but game scenes, etc; not to my taste. Then too, the whole world of "Bubba-art!" :)
Next point and perhaps important oversight on my part. Not connecting the dots. The fact which I realized but didn't appreciate as conjuring the '56 model stock design. The fact you're acquisition is a RIFLE, not CARBINE! The rifle, much, much more acceptable '56 design... Fitting with the latter fifties- early sixties era trend. Looking much more 'balanced' than the carbine which, particularly as owner of such... Simply isn't! With short barrel, more like 'boat-oar' proportions! The carbine buttstock area, excessive "hustle in the bustle!" Your rifle, much more 'simply-era'. Quk-pix of Sako 98 example, to me of both "tasteful" carving as well as such fifties era as popular pronounced buttstock 'bustle'. That admitting, a Bishop stock to my order in fifties!

Awaiting those pix!!! :) :) :)
Best & Stay Safe!
John
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
First please; you don't need to thank me! Your expertise in the shotgun arena has greatly helped me!
I'm really looking forward to some pix of the new MS. I'm also with you on declining the other '56 both on your basis of non-originality & carvings as described. These three-fourths century duration MS model rifles definitely - ARE collectibles! That nowadays first with utilitarian aspects 'there' for sure but definite second. When they fall off the "conductibility" cliff, a lot of value lost! Such my 1903 model fate & purchased at such discounted price accorded!
As generalization, can do with some tasteful stock carving, such as scroll checkering-border work, but game scenes, etc; not to my taste. Then too, the whole world of "Bubba-art!" :)
Next point and perhaps important oversight on my part. Not connecting the dots. The fact which I realized but didn't appreciate as conjuring the '56 model stock design. The fact you're acquisition is a RIFLE, not CARBINE! The rifle, much, much more acceptable '56 design... Fitting with the latter fifties- early sixties era trend. Looking much more 'balanced' than the carbine which, particularly as owner of such... Simply isn't! With short barrel, more like 'boat-oar' proportions! The carbine buttstock area, excessive "hustle in the bustle!" Your rifle, much more 'simply-era'. Quk-pix of Sako 98 example, to me of both "tasteful" carving as well as such fifties era as popular pronounced buttstock 'bustle'. That admitting, a Bishop stock to my order in fifties!

Awaiting those pix!!! :) :) :)
Best & Stay Safe!
John View attachment 3755610
Pretty wood on that Sako. I have a Schmidt Rubin 1911 that has similar wood. I would really like to finish it off but I will leave the rifle in correct military configuration. Sadly, my 1903 carbine has had the metal buttplate removed and a well worn, due to age, recoil pad installed. I bought a leather boot to cover the butt. Looks a bit better. I would like to find an original buttplate but the stock was cut straight to install the recoil pad. I will just leave it as is for now. Back in the 60s, I built a custom Mauser in 243. It has a Flagg barrel and a Fajan birdseye stock. Working with seasoned birdseye maple is like trying to reshape cement. Good shooter though. I just got word my new rifle will be shipped Tuesday so I might get it by next Friday. I will post photos of it. chris
 

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Pretty wood on that Sako. I have a Schmidt Rubin 1911 that has similar wood. I would really like to finish it off but I will leave the rifle in correct military configuration. Sadly, my 1903 carbine has had the metal buttplate removed and a well worn, due to age, recoil pad installed. I bought a leather boot to cover the butt. Looks a bit better. I would like to find an original buttplate but the stock was cut straight to install the recoil pad. I will just leave it as is for now. Back in the 60s, I built a custom Mauser in 243. It has a Flagg barrel and a Fajan birdseye stock. Working with seasoned birdseye maple is like trying to reshape cement. Good shooter though. I just got word my new rifle will be shipped Tuesday so I might get it by next Friday. I will post photos of it. chris
Hey Chris!
Real quick here: Below, my 1903, 'forend circumcised' carbine! Export model, clue as bottom metal prominently displaying "Made In Austria". Pix too of original butt plate. Abbbb
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sweet gun if not original!

Aside that hardened disintegrating butt pads a universal problem, yet real headache where "original" such as found on some vintage Win Model 70 Supergrades, of which I have a couple!!! The collector community; largely-grudgingly accepting of replacing such 'artifacts' as "best practice", though the jury still seems divided.
Best!
John
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hey Chris!
Real quick here: Below, my 1903, 'forend circumcised' carbine! Export model, clue as bottom metal prominently displaying "Made In Austria". Pix too of original butt plate. Abbbb View attachment 3755633 View attachment 3755634 sweet gun if not original!

Aside that hardened disintegrating butt pads a universal problem, yet real headache where "original" such as found on some vintage Win Model 70 Supergrades, of which I have a couple!!! The collector community; largely-grudgingly accepting of replacing such 'artifacts' as "best practice", though the jury still seems divided.
Best!
John
Here is a pic of my 1903. I don't know what year it was made but it appears to be an early one.
3755643
 

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Here is a pic of my 1903. I don't know what year it was made but it appears to be an early one. View attachment 3755643
Here is a pic of my 1903. I don't know what year it was made but it appears to be an early one. View attachment 3755643
Looks to be a complete refurb, with results... 'A beauty'. Putting my 'o3 to shame for sure! There was definitely something special about those four pre Great War Steyr Models! Below my 1905 in 9x57... And fessing up now that I see it. Not original due to great-visibility, Lyman folding rear open sight. Have an original, never installed since the Lyman simply so "user friendly"! :) The bit of gold color is "gold wash" and I'm informed "may be original".
Will be awaiting those pix!
Best & do Stay Safe
John
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Gun Firearm Rifle Trigger Shotgun
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Woodwind instrument accessory Brass Metal Wind instrument
 
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