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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Bought me a birthday gift a model 1935 Peruvian Mauser made by FN or so I believe from alittle research I have done. any thoughts would be great plus does anyone know where these might have been used as in battles, wars etc?
 

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Nice rifle; condition is average considering what you can find since these were used extensively.
Built by FN under Peruvian government contract during the late '30s to replace the Mauser 1909 long rifles.

They were used in combat (Along with '91s & '09s) during the 1941 war between Ecuador and us; here's a restored & colored period picture depicting Peruvian soldiers with 1935 rifles and ZB-30 LMGs:

View attachment 3376279

Later they remained in service until post-WWII when M-1 Garands replaced them at least partly (Hence the refurbishing program that converted a bunch to .30-06) and then in the early '60s by the FN-FALs (That prompted another refurbishing program to convert them to 7.62 NATO; both cases involved new barrels installed at FN). Last service use was in training, guard duties and police; a few hundreds were issued to State-sponsored civilian shooting clubs and used until recently in rifle shooting matches (In 7.62 NATO).

Even today some are captured every once in a while in usually poor (but serviceable) condition the hands of poachers, terrorists, criminals related to drug production and other rural delinquents.
 

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Some of the short rifles were converted to .30/06 and they seem to be easier to find though usually with mismatched bolts. The non-converted short rifles like yours usually have a matching bolt & I'm assuming that yours does. Then there is the short barreled "carbine" that is fairly scarce. I've not seen any of those converted to .30/06. Here's a picture of mine:



They all take the long FN export bayonet. I think the majority of use for these was rural police and border protection. All seem to show wear consistent with use in a rural tropical climate.
Regards
Dan
 

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The carbines were only converted to 7.62 NATO and are indeed scarce since contract was mostly for short rifles. As long as I know those ones were used by communication & artillery detachments.
 

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ADCC
Thanks for that information. I was guessing about who used them. Now I know for sure. I've never seen any of the carbines converted to 7.62 NATO here in the states. I've only seen one short rifle converted to 7.62 NATO for sale here in the states. They must not have exported many of those conversions.
Regards
Dan
 

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You're welcomed; maybe one or some in 7.62 NATO slipped the selection and got exported to the US back in the '60s when we got rid of most of our surplus material. Those in 7.65 & .30-06 are VERY scarce here and most remaining are the NATO ones.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks dan and acdd for the info I've not had a lot of luck researching this most of what I have found has been from this forum. I did clean the bore up today and as I was thinking or hoping it cleaned up nice bright and shiny with decent rifling. Can't wait for the snow to melt some and warm up to try it. Oh and it does have matching bolt
 

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Lucky you! matching bolt isn't common and you can read in older posts assorted reasons why those and rifles are usually mismatched. Don't know if converted rifles were later re-numbered to match by FN when barrels were changed, but they probably did.

Shiny bore is good....back then FN-made ammo used was corrosive and proper cleaning procedures weren't applied so barrels got eroded very quickly. Fortunately not all the Mausers we bought were fielded or used in live fire, so you can find a bunch of them with noticeable use wear but good mechanical condition, others VERY worn down in every aspect, and some almost unused or even pristine, but considering that the '35s were the ones that saw more service time, it's not quite easy to find them better than "average" condition.

If you shoot it a range report would be nice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I will try to do that and thank you for the history on these I think it is a beautiful rifle, I love the rifles that show wear and even abuse because you can always wonder man if this could talk what has it seen. It's all part of its history
 

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Another Peruvian Please

Debating whether to start a new Thread or tack onto this one. Decision here.
Below pix of my 1935 'matching' MOdelo 1935 Peruvian. Using 'matching' advisedly since only receiver & bolt with any visible SN. Stock, not. No imports marks I can 'easily' note. Assumption this is a "short rifle" configuration. . My presumption also that it remains in 7.65 chambering. If anyone has insight from the photos or otherwise, please advise!
Learned from above comments and thanks! Any further comments appreciated! Wear perhaps factoring, but notably smooth action.
Thanks for any further observations/comments!
Iskra/John
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
That's a nice rifle appears nicer than mine I did have alittle pitting by the wood line on mine. I have numbers on the stock ,barrel, receiver and bolt. My understanding and someone with more knowledge can correct me if wrong but I believe the ones converted to 30-06 had a 30 stamp on the rear of the receiver
 

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Iskra/John
Yep, yours is a short rifle also and in the original caliber to boot. Both yours and the one that Lostibspace picked up are in average original condition from what few that I've seen. I've seen a few more of the short rifles that were converted to .30/06 than the 7.65mm. All of those show refinish probably at the time of conversion. Yes, they are stamped .30 on the rear bridge plus the front receiver ring has a notch so that the longer .30/06 cartridges can be loaded into the magazine using 5 round stripper clips. My short carbine has light pitting at the wood line on the receiver and barrel. That seems to be the norm for the carbines. I don't let that bother me though because if I'm going to collect South American Mausers I'm gonna have to live with a little rust.
Regards
Dan
 

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Thanks for the kind replies and information, of which I've had little particularly including chambering originality! The metal condition looks pretty good other than finish, as in lack of. But I've not had it out of the stock and know there can be some rude awakenings concernin corrosion in such nether regions. Also then to ascertain the barrel SN, though I'd be surprised if not matching. Usually disassemblable parts going adrift. The stock doesn't appear to have any SN, but that not the focus of my photos. So just unlikely possibility. One question concerning the cruddy stock finish. Is that some kind of Bubba deluxe lacquer or the like? Also the accentuated clip guide elevation seems strange.
I paid hundred sixty for the gun in early Millenium, a fair price to considering essential matching and strong decent bore.
Again thanks and if any comments on that stock finish/clip guide - '...for the 'visually impaired'. :), Please advise.
John
 

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Very nice '35!

Clip guide is normal for this model.

Most of these rifles show rust and even pits below the wood line; those that were "upgraded" to 30-06 and later to 7.62NATO were also refinished back in FN when the barrels were changed and serialized to the receivers. Have yet to see a '35 of any caliber with a replacement barrel.

Regarding the wood finish, might be a local (As in down here) job to keep the wood from rotting in the usually so-so conditions of military storage, specially when the rifles were issued and they had to go through inspections.
 

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ADDCC
So would the conversions to .30/06 & 7.62 NATO done by FN in Belgium also have a Belgian proofed barrel?
Regards
Dan
 

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As long as I recall they should...at least the 7.62s since the barrels was also numbered to the receivers. Will have to take down mine to check and be 100% sure. The same should apply to the 30-06s but since VERY FEW of them remain here (Can't recall seeing more than 2, and maybe another 3 or 4 still in 7.65 since almost all of them were exported as surplus) I haven't had the opportunity to take one apart and check all the markings in the rifles.
 

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As a generalzation garnered principally from original FN sporting rifles, augmented by a few military models. all with proofs on barrel, reflective of completely assembled guns before leaving Belgium. Of course, exceptions possible.

I'd be happy pull my above specimen apart to have a look at the barrel, contingent upon: Locating it in my several containers. Reasonable assurance likely decrepit handguard remaining intact during removal. Supposition such retained by spring steel clips, often handguard weakest yield point. Cracking. . Any experience/insight concerning removing handguards safely?
John
 
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