Gunboards Forums banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
466 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Picked this up for $150 at a gun show to tinker and fix up. I believe this to be a model 10 but not sure if it's model 10A or otherwise. Very little in markings left on it which I attached all I found so far. Also can anyone tell me a year of manufacture?

Last question. I've searched and found little on disassembly of the bolt. Anyone have a lead on instructions before I just jump in and try on my own? Any help is appreciated.

Jeremy
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
466 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I did see that yes but miss the part about the firing pin. I will read though it again. Perhaps this time slower and with my glasses on. Appreciate the heads up.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
894 Posts
Hey! I have one of those. Belonged to my wife's great-uncle.
He was in WWI. Went half-deaf and blind because of gas.

They said it was his Army gun. I doubt it but it DOES look like it was through a war.

I never knew it took-down although I was curious of the mechanism at the magazine tube.

Will go home and play with that!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
466 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hey! I have one of those. Belonged to my wife's great-uncle.
He was in WWI. Went half-deaf and blind because of gas.

They said it was his Army gun. I doubt it but it DOES look like it was through a war.

I never knew it took-down although I was curious of the mechanism at the magazine tube.

Will go home and play with that!
Finish on mine is 99% gone. Bought it to practice finishing techniques on. Didn't know it when I bought it but C&Rsenal did an episode on it.

I'm happy with my $150 purchase.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
826 Posts
There probably are some instructionals on You Tube. In MY OPINION, out of Stevens, Marlin, Winchester, and the off shoots, this is one of the worst early shotguns to work on internally. When I did run into one to repair, it was usually because someone took it apart. Some people may love them and find them easy to work on. When they do work, they are an OK gun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
466 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I just finished a Stevens 620 and it was leaps and bounds easier to work on then the remington. It's almost as if Remington took a very simple design and decided to try and make it as complicated as possible. I can no longer shoot due to an injury and like mechanisms and tinkering. With only $150 invested it sure makes it stress free.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
894 Posts
I can see this. The bolt has to be forward to get the bar in. I had pulled the trigger and pushed the button, looking at how things worked while it was apart. Had to bump the receiver on the rug to get the bolt locked-up so I could reassemble.
While it functions just fine, it looks like a world of fun to remove the bolt! The bottom load/eject mechanism seems pretty complex.

Mine has a cracked wrist. No finish left. Probably never find a stock to match patina.
I will relegate it to the wall of oldies.

Some entertainment!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
466 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Bolt comes out pretty easy although it is a weird way of doing it. Bolt and the flapper come out together.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
829 Posts
I've had a few of the Field grade M10's, one Riot gun and have only one M10 lefft right now.
That one is a Model 10T. That designation is for the Model 10- Target.
Though many will list that designation as a Trap Grade (T),,the Trap Grade was designated by an 'S",,,Model 10S.

The Model 10T had a vent rib and was a late edition to the Model 10 line. I think it came out in 1926.
The Mod 10 was discontinued in 1928/29 and replaced by the nearly the same Model 29.

Interestingly, the vent rib on the Model 10 (and also the semiauto Model 11 and the later Model 31 pump) were all made as one piece with the bbl.
No separate rib or post assembly parts soldered or pinned to the bbl itself.
All milled from a one piece bbl forging. Quite a piece of work for early 20th century factory mfg'r.

The Mod10 is a design from John Pedersen,,the Pedersen Devise guy. Also the mind behind the Remington Model 12 22 cal pump rifle and the CF Model 14 and Model 25 pump rifles.

Complicated inside when compared to say a Model 12 or an Ithaca 37, but part of the design was likely having to bypass JMB designs & patents of the era.

The M10 works well and I shoot my current 10T nearly every week.
It came w/ 2 Factory fitted butt stocks numbered to the gun.

When they get worn, they need repair like any other pump or semiauto. They don't last forever.

The two main complains are the inability to load directly into the chamber.
( Unlike the Model 37 which can be loaded into the chamber past the carrier bars, the M10 will not allow a shell to be placed directly into the chamber because of it's ejector spring above the chamber in the roof of the recv'r.)
The carrier being a very unconventional style gets frowns and dislike from users as t doesn't have the leverage and camming power of the common pivoting carrier seen in most designs. When the small rotating cam surface on the pivot shaft of the 'flipper' carrier wears , the carrier goes out of time quickly and balky feeding results.

Many new owners find out after TD'ing the shotgun that they can't get the bbl assembly back onto the frame again.
All it takes is for you to dry fire the firing pin,,then the bbl assembly will drop right into the frame and twist, & lock on.
But there's nothing on the gun to indicate that to you.
Many of these show gnarly marks around the tapered outside edge of the chamber from trying to force the bbl back into position.

There is a TD take up system in the face of the frame for wear. Not too unlike the Winchester style on the M12/97/42.


I think they are nice shotguns,,but then I like the off the beaten path type of stuff..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
882 Posts
For the Remington Model 10, please find and download a pdf copy of army technical manual TM-9-285, Shotguns, All Types, 1942.

you will find therein complete disassembly, reassembly, operating, and troubleshooting instructions for many popular shotguns that were in use by the military at that time. Including the Remington Model 10, 12, and 31, Model 11, Winchester Model 97, Ithaca Model 37, and Stevens 520/620.

I have at one time or another owned all of these guns except the M10, and have used that manual religiously with all of them. The manual is a valuable tool I use to keep these old guns running and in good nick. I have no doubt it will serve your model 10 well.

find it. Use it. Enjoy.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top