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I was in Cabela's tonight and saw this MkIII* (Enfield, 1917 I believe) that was in very nice shape. VERY nice. When I picked it up, I noticed there was an FTR engraving/electro-pencil on the side with a date of 1953.

Does anyone know when they stopped FTRing MkIIIs? Have you ever seen this late of a date? (sorry about the photos - they are from the cell phone)
 

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BSA FTR'd a number of No1s in 1953. They sometimes turn up (although I've never seen one in Australia) and usually have fairly blonde wood, black Suncorite finish and the markings you've described. I'd grab one for sure.

Cheers,
Matt
 

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JollyGreenSlug says,"I'd grab one for sure."

Judging from his sig. line I'd say he'd grab any enfield he could get his hands on.

Wheeler44
 

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I seriously considered grabbing it, until I saw the $420 USD price tag. Yeminah!

Also, I noticed that it was not brought back to the MkIII standard as other post war FTRs were.
 

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Not all that bad a price if it was unissued from the FTR.

Also, I noticed that it was not brought back to the MkIII standard as other post war FTRs were.
Post WWII FTRs were done to MkIII* standards.
 

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They also did some No.2 MkIV* .22 rifles in this same time frame. For what ever reason the nose cap piling swivel stud was removed during the rework. I don't know if the nosecap work was also done on the full bore rifle as well. My example has a green strip on the forestock indicating non standard caliber. It is generally believed (but not proved) that the contract was for an arabic speaking country.
 

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The piling swivel boss was not removed from the .303 rifles in the 1953 FTR program in any kind of regular fashion---if at all.
The pictured FTR 1953/1944 Dispersal rifle still has the boss and so did the other one (1918 BSA) I used to own.

I agree with jrhead75 about the pricing, especially in a retail store setting.
-----krinko
 

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So my 1918 RSAF Enfield MkIII* has a later type rear sight cap, and an unusually crisp trigger letoff. Did the Brits do arsenal refurbish work of any degree during, let's say WWII, with out using the FTR mark?
 

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So my 1918 RSAF Enfield MkIII* has a later type rear sight cap, and an unusually crisp trigger letoff. Did the Brits do arsenal refurbish work of any degree during, let's say WWII, with out using the FTR mark?
All kinds of it. Before WWI, and between the wars, rework or reinspection was often denoted by a 2 digit date on the L/H side of the buttsocket, near the safety. I'd assume that under wartime stress, serviceable rifles were more important than proper marking, as I haven't seen many rifles with wartime dates stamped in this area. "FTR" as a mark starts showing up late in WWII.
 

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I'd be surprised if there was much FTR work being done during the war. I'd have expected them to just assign poor-condition rifles to Home Guard units where there was little chance of them being needed...
 

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I'd be surprised if there was much FTR work being done during the war. I'd have expected them to just assign poor-condition rifles to Home Guard units where there was little chance of them being needed...
Just the opposite...both wars caught Britain with a shortage of rifles. Earlier models were updated and worn rifles were refurbished as fast as it could be done.
 

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Thanks jrhead75. That helps fill things in a bit. I assumed that this rifle must have done it's share in at least the early part of WWII, fighting off the Krauts.
 
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