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Discussion Starter #1
I got a century special for 129.95.the rifle is really nice all matching 1915
BSA ,It has a big E.Y. mark on top of the rec and barrel ,it also has
the same mark on the buttstock with numbers above and below the
E.Y. mark it also has many other marks on the stock and is marked with a R and F
with a arrow mark between the r and f and a 1925 date below it on the
rec socket opposite of the bolt.It also has a gri on the top of the rec.
I pretty much collected #4 enfieldes and know little about the #1.
What does the E.Y. Mark mean.I have not shot it and have been trying
to find info on the marks i know nothing about.
Thanks for any help
Bear
 

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Sounds like a 1925 Indian rework of a British made rifle that was converted to a grenade launcher. I don't know if anyone's come up with the definitive answer as to what 'EY' actually stands for, other than a downgrade from frontline status that's usually found on rifles that have been reinforced for grenade firing.

Are the any indentations on the forestock where wire would've been wrapped around and soldered in place? Even if the wire's been removed, there's usually some evidence of it left behind.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I could not find any evidence of the wire wrap,is this type of rifle
safe to shot or should i consider sending it back ,i will dig out a
.303 round and see how it does down the bore.
Thanks for the info.
Bear
 

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IIRC its 'extra yeild' , but i dont have my LES referance at the tip of my fingers and its been a long time since ive thought/read about this , there are folks more up on it than me here that will chime in , but thats what i think it stood for
 

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I received a 1917 LSA Mk I No. III which was stamped EY on receiver and barrel. When I asked around about it I was told it meant "Emergency Use" (EY is also the initials of the guy who came up with the idea for lobbing grenades with Enfields). It's tied in somehow with rifles being pulled from frontline service for use as reserve or grenade firing enfields. I was told to have it checked by a competent gunsmith, because the "EY" stamp could cover a broad range of deficincies.

I don't know if the above is absolutely correct, but it is the general gist of what I learned while researching the stamp marks. I also learned that when they were stamped EY, no further upgrades or maintenance were done to the rifles (hence why the 1917 I got still had the magazine cutoff and no FTR stamps or other signs of refurbishment). The words "Emergency Use" concerned me just enough that I sent it back to Century for an exchange. Ended up with a nice 1913 Enfield No. I Mk III.

-Jason
 

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I have an '04 BSA I.P. 1** with E.Y (not E.Y.) stamped on the receiver ring flat and on the barrel. It does not have evidence of wire-wrap and does not have the Ishy screw. RFI 1915 with WA43 backsight. Barrel and receiver sn's match but bolt does not. Oddly enough - pure coincidence, bolt is numbered 91904.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the info,i checked the bore with the bullet test and it
is tight and the bore has nice lands.I did notice the bolt head
has max lth stamped on the side of it,so my thoughts are
excessive head space.I may send it back though,i need to
check the headspace on it.
 

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E.Y. Rifle

Not all EY rifles were grenade throwers, some were just old, tired, worn out rifles. The reason that most Grenade thrower rifles were marked EY, is that the 'blanks' that were used for grenade throwing, did not do the barrels any good. So you may as well use a worn rifle, than a nice new one.
 

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IIRC its 'extra yeild' , but i dont have my LES referance at the tip of my fingers and its been a long time since ive thought/read about this , there are folks more up on it than me here that will chime in , but thats what i think it stood for
It is the initials of the Gent that invented the grenade launching but it also seems to be a commonly accepted abbreviation for EmergencY use only. It is commonly found on downgraded weapons but unless it is shown in the LoC then there is no chance of establishing its correct use. Many rifles have been rebuilt using DP or EY stamped parts, it usually means that in wartime they were downgraded without additional work being done to them such as deactivation. I would recommend getting a good gunsmith to check it out failing that if you know someone with the right gauges and the experience to look for defects then fire away!
 

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The only reference, I am aware of, to Edward Yule (the allegeded inventor) can be found in an unpublished manuscript I fjound in the Pattern Room library. Ian mentioned it in his books. There was no reference or sourcing of the notation in the manuscript. I wouldn't take it to the bank. Perhaps a patent review??? I have seen gov't documents referenciing EY as emergency usage. I have yet to find the criteria by which one is sentenced as EY.
 

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If Ian is to be believed and the research is generally very good, EY just meant downgraded from 1st line use. Now that could be failing unit armoureres inspections, being sent back to depot (in my day BLR beyond local Repair) and failing further inspection. This could mean that the rifle was issued to 2nd or 3 line or even LoC troops for self defence as in emergency only or it could be sent to a training unit and used for initial weapon training. Many DP marked rifles ended up this way. EY could be the ones that were safe to fire in emergency and DP were the next level and dangerous to fire. The DP of my era was the cutaway L59A1 of the No.4 and by then SLRs were in and there was time to do this properly. EY hasnt been used on the L1 series to my experience, rifles would just be scrapped for parts!
 

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A slight mod to that DP. It was often used to mark rifles that were obsolete in service.
I have a .303 Martini carbine marked as such. It is quite serviceable but was relegated for drill.
HOWEVER that is only one exception. Most DP rifles are disabled in one way or the other, ie; cuts in the barrel, holes drilled in the chamber, both sideways and on the underside, friring pins broken off, bolt face welded shut, and other 'orrible things done to them You wouldn't want to get a live round ANYWHERE NEAR those.
Oh by the way, I have an L59A1. PLUS the remains of a L59A1 reciever that was torch cut roughly 3/4 of an inch behind the charger guide and having two inches of barrel left. Deacting a De-act! LOL Found on a rubbish tip. I suppose this was the rate payers taxes at work!
 

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The only reference, I am aware of, to Edward Yule (the allegeded inventor) can be found in an unpublished manuscript I fjound in the Pattern Room library. Ian mentioned it in his books. There was no reference or sourcing of the notation in the manuscript. I wouldn't take it to the bank. Perhaps a patent review??? I have seen gov't documents referenciing EY as emergency usage. I have yet to find the criteria by which one is sentenced as EY.
Something is not right here, methinks, wrt E.Y or E.Y. meaning "emergency use (emergency yuse?) or Edward Yule. No criticism about the Edward Yule reference, but what would he have had to do with LEs being categorized and stamped as E.Y./E.Y? I cannot believe that the logically-thinking (even if complexity-prone) people officially determining LE designations would use "Y" for "use" - strikes me as a "pidgin English" sort of thing. "Emergency Yield" ? Makes sense in some degree except that logic says that EY would be gramatically more correct - not E.Y./E.Y - The "Brits" are, if anything, quite correct in the use of their language/punctuation. I wonder - given the fact that my BSA is an I.P., if the folks at Ishapore may not have had a "grasp" of English and assumed that the E needed a "period" and, for some reason, the Y did not (in my rifle's instance). Begs the question too, what is the predominant usage history of LEs stamped E.Y or E.Y.? Does anyone have an LE stamped with "EY" (no periods)?
 

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Depending upon if the weapon was stamped in a unit armourers or by a major depot or even somewhere like Weedon would have bearing upon the quality of the checking of the work and the follow up inspections before it was disposed of. No weapons are to be sold out of service without Proofing so it may have been deemed beyond ecenomic repair and gone for scrap. This doesnt mean it is scrap, just not worth the effort backloading for repair or upgrading to a later mark.
 

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Bezoar,

You missed a little something along the way. An EY abbreviation could be simply using the first and last letters of 'Emergency'.
As we read the abbreviation 'ConD.' today, most of us automatically assume it means 'condition'. However, on an Enfield it means 'Converted'.

Having said that, a period between the E and the Y surely gives reason to question the "Emergency" origins; Doesn't it?
I'm certainly not a fan of "Extra Yield" although the term was loosely used to describe reinforced grenade rifles. Too many EY's out there lacking the reinforcement and a well worn rifle wouldn't 'extra yield' anything. Well, aside from perhaps yielding a little extra distance when somebody was shooting one alongside you :)
 

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Please remember that the logic that dictated markings in 19 something or other wouldnt necessarily make sense nowadays!
 

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EY

Aloha

I have a 1915 BSA MKIII that used to have just a plain old EY on the knox-form together with a rust star before I had it rebarreled. No periods.

It had also been FTRed at Ishapore. It has RFI 1926 on the left receiver band and also SL, indicating single loading. It has holes drilled into the receiver beneath the fore-end indicating the fitting of some sort of platform for single loading.

However, the EY also had strike out lines through it suggesting a change of heart in its EY designation.

Cheers

Steve
 

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Bezoar,

You missed a little something along the way. An EY abbreviation could be simply using the first and last letters of 'Emergency'.
As we read the abbreviation 'ConD.' today, most of us automatically assume it means 'condition'. However, on an Enfield it means 'Converted'.

Having said that, a period between the E and the Y surely gives reason to question the "Emergency" origins; Doesn't it?
I'm certainly not a fan of "Extra Yield" although the term was loosely used to describe reinforced grenade rifles. Too many EY's out there lacking the reinforcement and a well worn rifle wouldn't 'extra yield' anything. Well, aside from perhaps yielding a little extra distance when somebody was shooting one alongside you :)
I had considered "EmergencY but for the period(s). E.mergencY/E.mergencY. - does not work for me, short of English language/punctuation illiteracy on the part of some Commonwealth armorer. Esoteric thing. Still, I've pondered the E.Y for all the years I've owned this rifle and I still don't know what it means, dammit!
 

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Here is a no "period" model "EY". 1915 ,Enfield manufacture Mk.III with original 1915 dated barrel that shines. Everything on this rifle is EFD marked and correct except the rear sight which had been renumbered to match... non-windage adjustable but still Enfield marked. I can't find anything on it to suggest why it has been marked EY other than maybe a victim of obsolescence. EY also appears on the underside of the forestock just in front of the trigger guard.



David
 
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