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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Just like to know what I have here. I found this in my modest collection of scientific instruments. Purchased long ago for no particular reason other than being brass and very solid and well made. Perhaps I could write some notes on an index card. I now assume military becasue I see the arrow.

Can I claim this is something Lawrence of Arabia might have used? I guess not with 1941 on it. Seems odd, why the two dates?

You can see in the photo it says :
BRINTON COMPASS
ROSS EVANS LONDON
1914-1941
MK1

Gas Font Fashion accessory Metal Cable


Wheel Automotive tire Automotive lighting Tire Motor vehicle
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I did a series of Google searches and it seems likely this is copy of the Brunton. I am surprised because this one looks old and fully functional. I have yet to see a link that shows any original and proper "Brinton". it does not look Indian or Chinese. I did see many eBay listing with prices low enough that those were some kind of copy. I read they even add the arrow head.

Fair warning, I may have posted a fake/copy. I dont know. It is not looking good.
 

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The quality looks too good for an Indian made compass.
If it is a copy, it looks like a very good one. Doubtful Lawrence used one though. This type of compass was used by artillery and engineers. It was a backup for the artillery aiming circle - "bussole" - and engineers' transit. It can measure both horizontal and vertical angles, although for any reliable readings it needed to be supported on something.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If it is a copy, it looks like a very good one. Doubtful Lawrence used one though. This type of compass was used by artillery and engineers. It was a backup for the artillery aiming circle - "bussole" - and engineers' transit. It can measure both horizontal and vertical angles, although for any reliable readings it needed to be supported on something.
Thank you for the thought on usage. It is abit much for just a compass. Engineer, even a crude survery or artillery that all makes more sense. There is no provision to screw it down on a tripod. But there is a machined beveled circular surface that looks like it would mate up to a base on something.
 

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OP item looks good to me. Use of two different styles of engraving is a positive. Google when Ross and Evans were in business together and that gives a window for production. If they never were, then bogus I guess...

Ross was definitely a WW1 maker.

I think Brinton is the type of compass rather than the maker. Usually the original manufacture date is on it.

There was a major refurbishment of service instruments after WW1 and up to WW2 . Many had Radium removed from dials or were re-purposed and given new designations. Any markings related to the refurb or change in designation were engraved in a style like the 1914-1941 MK. I. Mostly the original manufacture date and designation was struck out by a neat line and new desig / refurb date replacing it.
 

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This looks like our M2 compass used for mortars. We (USA) use the M 1950 Lensatic compass for all other compass requirements. The Brit compass here brings up a question (be it real, or a good copy). what compass did British Infantry use in WWI and WWII. If they used this model, it was over kill.

As to the Indian made versions of this compass, I did see vendors in Saudi Arabia selling them, bright polished brass and quite good looking , I almost bought one, now ...wish I had. They were only $25
 

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This looks like our M2 compass used for mortars. We (USA) use the M 1950 Lensatic compass for all other compass requirements. The Brit compass here brings up a question (be it real, or a good copy). what compass did British Infantry use in WWI and WWII. If they used this model, it was over kill.

As to the Indian made versions of this compass, I did see vendors in Saudi Arabia selling them, bright polished brass and quite good looking , I almost bought one, now ...wish I had. They were only $25
Funny: The M2 compass is still made in the USA by Brunton. The M50 lensatic compass was made by Brunson. Now we have a Brinton compass. Coincidence?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Yes indeed my friend Google. I did google (more of them) and pretty certain I have a copy. 99.9%. It would have been better if Google actually turned up what this is a copy of.

This Amazon hit looks right on. I think this is just an amazing copy! sOMEONE musT have been making these for a while, becasue mine has some age on it. Then so do I :)


New from the Amazon seller. The inside view looks the same too.

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The original WW1 era markings tend to be finely scribed or stamped, with thin smooth lines uniform font. Upgraded WW1 originals have upgrade markings done with a rotary inscriber as per the item in the OP (fuzzy thick lines done by pantograph.) The original lettering alignment is not convincing.

So that is why I think the two inscription styles is a good sign if you assume that most modern reproductions would not bother with that level of detail. But then again, they might.... That said, I have a problem that the original compass did not have a manufacture date or Mark designation in the early font. The ambiguous dating and mark number in the rotary scriber font is not typical of the originals I have seen.
 
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