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We'll toss everything else into this pile, like the Jarmann harpoon gun and Danish rolling blocks, Danish Lend-Lease Garands, Norwegian Nagant revolvers, etc.
 

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Norwegian troops, circa 1895, armed with Jarmann rifles.
 

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Here's my little heavy weight Jarman Mdl 28 Harpoon/line throwing gun as posted elsewhere, together with a sealed packet of blank cartridges. Now all I need is a brace of harpoons and a suitable target. The target I can come up with, but the harpoons are going to be a bit difficult.







Here's a link to more information of these predecessors to the Norwegian Krag including photos of the complete kit.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jarmann_M1884


LDHare
 

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Rigspolitiet RPLT 42 karabiner

This is my Schultz & Larsen Model 38/RPLT 42 rifle. It is chambered for the 8x58R Danish cartridge. Early in the Occupation of Denmark (1940-1945) by Nazi Germany, the German authorities were concerned over the ease at which the Danes were going out of and coming back into Denmark. Refugees, Danish military, and Resistance people were going to Sweden and England in some number and the Resistance operatives were smuggling illegal materials back into Denmark. So it was proposed that a unit of Danish coastal police (kystpolitiet) be formed as part of the Rigspoliti (National Police).

The order for a rifle to outfit the new coast police went to Schultz & Larsen in 1942. It is believed that 800-1100 of these rifles were made, but whether or not they were all issued is unknown. Serial numbers started at “100”. Although this rifle is designated the RPLT 42, it is actually a Model 38. The Model 38 rifle was developed as a hunting rifle in the 1930s and was chambered for the 8x58R Danish cartridge. I have seen one example that was chambered for the 6.5x58RD. The Model 38 was also the first bolt action centerfire repeater designed and built at the geværfabriken in Otterup. Schultz & Larsen also supplied the coast police with K98k rifles, rebarreled by S&L.

Production of the rifles ended in 1943 because of a sabotage incident at the factory and the German authorities started cracking down on the Resistance movement. By this time many of the Danish police were being arrested and sent to concentration camps as the Germans became increasingly alarmed at the growing Danish anger toward the Germans and the armed resistance of the people. The Danish Royal Army also came under abuse by the Nazis and virtually the entire officer corps fled en masse to Sweden. They were soon to form Den Danske Brigade as a force to assist in the liberation of Denmark when that came. Although it is a story for another time, Sweden wasn’t quite as neutral during WW II as it is sometimes portrayed.

Once England liberated Denmark and the war came to a close, Schultz & Larsen began converting the RPLT 42 rifles into hunting rifles. They could be had in half-stock and whole-stock models. Many of these rifles ended up in Sweden after the war. My rifle came from Sweden and had been owned by a private citizen. Unfortunately, I know of a group of around 15 of these great rifles that were destroyed by moisture and rust while stored in an uprotected location.

I have not fired this rifle to test the accuracy, but it is a Schultz & Larsen and with the right load, it should shoot quite well.













The receiver/bolt were designed with four rear locking lugs and a ported receiver. As with all S&L rifles of this design, single loading could be done by dropping a cartridge in the port. Multiple cartridges were loaded through the bottom. Although unconventional, the S&L action is a very strong one and very rigid.
 

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Very interesting, thanks for sharing. I notice at least three locking lugs towards the rear end of the bolt, are there any up front? A picture of the bolt would be nice.

Balder
 

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S&L Bolt and Jarmann Harpoon Gun

Balder, Above, I've attached some photos of the bolt. Four rear locking lugs. This design, with improvements over time, was used by S&L on rifle Models 54J, 56A, 60, 65, 68, 77, and 80 into the 1970s time period.

LDHare, fabulous Jarmann! Could you add some close up photos of the receiver? It appears to be in excellent condition.
 

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Norwegian Nagant

Gentlemen (assuming that there are no women on this board either - if there are please excuse me),

Here's my M/1893 Nagant, serial # 65XX. The holster seems to be harder to find that the revolver itself.

Balder







 

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Norwegian Kammerlader M1849/55

I'll take better pics some day, this rifle is so long and difficult to shoot decent pictures of. Mine is an 1852 vintage, caliber .69, shooting 900 grains of lead propelled by around 70 grains of black powder. Not something I'd like to be at the receiving end of. I'm going to shoot it at the end of the month, hopefully I'll live to tell you guys about the experience.

Balder





 

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Balder: That's a fine looking Kammerlader. Not too many of those beauties around, at least on this side of the Atlantic. Actually, I almost acquired one at a local gunshow several years ago, but dallied a bit too long and it was gone on my return. I'd love to hear how she performs.


Well, I guess I'll stretch the envelope again and post a couple of photos of my three Danish Sjorgren 12 gauge semiautomatic shotguns. The top one is the standard version, the second is the same, but with british proof marks, and the bottom one is the short barrel version with the additional spring assist attached to the left side of the receiver to return the action to battery and compensate for the short barrel. To be honest, I've never shot them because I'm a bit leary of having that big lump of metal coming back at my face on discharge. It must be somewhat disconcerting to say the least. Still, they're an interesting design although not many were made and it wasn't exactly a market success.






Mr. Moderator: Please feel free to delete this posting if you determine that it is out of bounds.


LDHare
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
You're not even close to pushing the limits here yet. Keep trying.


Dutchman
 

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Danish naval revolver M1871-82. If I recall correctly about 1000 were ordered by the Danish navy in pinfire, most all were later returned and converted to centerfire in 1882. Made and converted by Auguste Francotte. This one is still in excellent mechanical condition, with about 45% bluing.


 

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Slim long blonds from Norway

Hi guys. Here are some pictures of three norwegian military rifles in my collection. They all have matching numbers, and are in very good condition. From the left:

· Lunds kammerlader M1860
· Kongsberg Rolling Block M1867
· Krag Jørgensen M1894
 

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Beautiful rifles!!! I am starting to like the rolling blocks lately as well. Your rifles are in such good condition. Thanks for sharing.
 

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Bergmann 1910 and 1910/21

I would like to share some photos from my collection of Bergmann 1910 and 1910/21 with you.

The first picture is an original M1910 made i Belgium. The next two is converted to M1910/21 with different types of hand grips. Both are made in Belgium.

The last two pictures shows a rather speciel version, without numbers. This is a pistol, that were made by the resistance movement with captured spareparts from a raid under WWII. There were made about 50 pieces of this "illegal serie". I'm lucky to have two of the 50 pieces in my collection.

Regards
Niels
 

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Kriggevaer, yes, there was a danish resistance movement against the germans, which was largely formed after the german defeat in Stalingrad, when it became clear that the germans would lose the war. Up to 1943, it was mostly the danish communist resistance movement who fought the germans in Denmark, because they were being arrested by the germans and their danish collaborators.


However, not to forget that 77 danish military officers, including danish army generals, joined the german war effort on the eastern front as Waffen SS soldiers, as well as give their oat of allegiance to Hitler, with the full support of the then danish government and royalty.

12000 danes signed up as vounteers for the Waffen SS, and the german needed a stick to fight them off, an only accepted 6000 of these danes, to be fit enough to join the Waffen SS. About half of them died on the eastern front. The survivors felt into disgrace after WW2, as the Danish Parliament enacted a law, "landsvigerloven", which made anyone who had served in the german armed forces, liable to spend two years in jail. Danish officers who volunteered in german service spend up to ten years i jail.

About 13000 danes were arrested after WW2, for collaborating with the invading germans, 76 were sentenced to dead, and 46 were executed.

This same story is very semilar to the one in Norway as well as most of the german occupied territories at the time. Also, 300 swedes, joined the Waffen SS.
 

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Repro: Norwegian Kammerlader M1849 stock

Cellebrated my fathers 71th birthday yesterday. During cellebration he pulled up a homework going on, making a repro stock for a Kammerlader 1849. Made of birch. Allways interresting looking into old designs. The Kammerlader stock is very long and slim, and need carefull work while making it due to the thin/slim style.
 

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Danish 1853-65 Snider rifle

Here is a picture of my Danish snider rifle with bayonet, chambered for the 18x29R rimfire cartridge. Originally these were pillar breech percussion short rifles used by the Holsteiners and then got turned over to the Danes for use in the navy.
 

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Does someone have the picture where the Gemans burnd a lot of Jarman rifles? Ore know where to find the picture?
 

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Snider update:

After much patience in acquiring bits and pieces, the Snider posted a few posts higher has finally barked to life (how's yours JK?).

The bullet is actually for the Danish 1848 pillar breech rifle (also converted to Snider). I bought it in Germany on the off chance that it might fit. It is quite a coincidence. Note the concave base.


The case before and after:


Lastly, the result!


Load was a mere 50grn de Swiss#3. Recoil very soft.
50m standing unsupported.
 
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