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Discussion Starter #1
A friend has inherited a M1 that looks new. it is not a rework, just beautiful.
Any idea as to the value?.
Thanks1
 

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There is far, far more that goes into determining the worth.

Who was the receiver manufacturer and what was the serial number?

This will tell if it is pre-war, wartime, or post-war production.

Any prospective buyer would want to verify that it isn't a rework, as most Garands are. They would scrutinize the barrel manufacturer. They would see if the trigger group was manufactured by the same company as did the receiver. They can tell if the parts are original by looking at the "drawing numbers" on the smaller parts.

Perhaps they aren't called "drawing numbers", but they aren't serial numbers either. They would look to see if the stock has a cartouche stamped into the wood. I believe this might suggest that an armory DID refurbish this rifle at some point.

Is the stock walnut or birch?

Does it have a lockbar rear sight? A single slot gas plug?

That kind of stuff. Determining the worth of an M1 is no easy task.
 

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Super Moderator Platinum Member Zombie Killer
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As CC said, too many factors go into determining value w/o in-depth detail examination of most of the parts to see if the drawing numbers are in range with the s/n on the receiver. Whether the parts are SA marked for a Springfield, whether they are H&R marked, Win marked, IH marked....you see, the value could be from $350-$3500 in a hurry...
 

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As an example, you can have a Springfield Armory M1 rifle with all parts including the stock being Springfield Armory manufacture and yet all the parts are incorrect for the receiver. This is because over the years that the M1 rifle was manufactured, design modifications were made to parts for improved functioning or for ease of manufacture. These parts are identified by a revision number that follows the drawing number. In addition to this, without getting too technical, how the drawing and revision numbers were stamped changed over the years. So in order to determine if a particular M1 rifle with all parts being produced by the same manufacturer are original to the receiver, you would first need to know the month and year the receiver was manufactured. Then you would have to research the approximate revision number of a part for the given month and year of the receiver. Also, were there changes in the way drawing and revision numbers were applied to the part. The revision number doesn't have to be exact because there is always overlapping, but should be close. Stocks don't have drawing or revision numbers but the markings put on them help to date them.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It is a Springfield. Next time I see it I'll try to get more info.
One thing did stand out. There was a coiled paper cylinder in the barrel.
Was this the way it was shipped. All the US rifles I have seen (not that many)
came with the barrel full of cosmoline.
Thanks!
 

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A friend has inherited a M1 that looks new. it is not a rework, just beautiful.
Any idea as to the value?.
Thanks1
Hawkins,

The guys are correct..... Without checking each and every single part for either obvious markings or very subtle clues as to it's time and manufacturer you will not be able to make a determination of value.

Also... do NOT be fooled into thinking that just because an M1 looks "mint" that it is an original rifle with all it's original parts. 99.99% of ALL M1 rifles have been through at LEAST one full arsenal rebuild. They usually came out of these rebuilds looking just as new as the day they left the factory for the first time.

There is a HUGE difference in value between the two..... An all original SA M1 from WWII, even in well worn shape with a hosed barrel, can sell for upwards of $2500 to $3000 to a collector. The rifle with the next serial number in line, looking brand new and fresh from a rebuild in the 50's or 60's... is worth maybe $700- $800. The latter description is MUCH more common than the first one... and is 99.99% chance what your friend has in his hands. Only breaking the rifle down and examining the parts can you be sure....

Best regards,
Swampy

Garands forever
 

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There was a coiled paper cylinder in the barrel.
Was this the way it was shipped ??
Yes..... from an arsenal rebuild most likely.... ready to be placed in long term storage.

The little tube is called a VPC (VCP??) insert. It's the 1950's & 60's version of a moisture retardant / rust preventative.

Best regards,
Swampy

Garands forever
 

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My DCM Harrington & Richardardson M1 rifle I received in 1986 came with the tube in the barrel. If I remember correctly, it was designated VPI, the V and I representing Vapor Inhibitor. I guess there came a time where it became easier to deal with tubes rather than cosmolene.
 

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By the way, my early Harrington & Richardson M1 rifle looks absolutely mint but most of the small parts are Springfield Armory. Also, remove the butt stock and check the right front receiver leg. If there are letters and numbers electro-scribed on it, the letters are a code to indicate the facility and the numbers indicate the month/year the M1 rifle was arsenal overhauled. Then there is no question that the rifle isn't original.
 

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The treated tube is meant to protect the bore of the M1 rifle during long term storage and has nothing to do with wether or not the rifle was ever arsenal overhauled. Did you check the right front receiver leg, with butt stock removed, to see if there are any electro-scribed markings as I mentioned in an earlier post? I believe the treated paper tube in the bore of the M1 rifle indicates a DCM or CMP purchase. I can't imagine aquiring a M1 rifle with the rust preventative tube in the bore any other way. I would contact the CMP with the serial number and see if they can confirm it, and if so, request written documentation. This will enhance the M1's value and collectibility.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I didn't ask the question right. When the M1's left the factory did they have the tube in
the barrel. If as someone stated the tube began use in the 50's I believe that they were phasing out the M1 somtime around there. If the tube shows DCM or CMP handling that is
another data point. If I get a chance I will check for the markings.
Thanks to all.
 
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