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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Dealer with this item called me over for my opinion on orginality. Told him exactly what it was, that his price was fair at his standard "last ditch" bayonet in wood scabbard price, then bought it. He was afraid it was a recent Chinese copy because of condition and because it didn't "look" right. For those who haven't seen one, it's a Type 30 "Naval Special" bayonet. Easiest way to ID is false edge along top 2 inches of blade. Normally found in a rubberized canvas scabbard/frog combo or in a crude metal scabbard. This scabbard (probably Toyoda Loom) does not fit well as it wears the blue on blade when inserted/removed (throat too narrow). BUT, the scabbard has an ID paper of some kind with remnants of Kanji, which is unusual in itself. Bayonet is my third of this type and the most I have spent for one at $175, but at about 98% condition with excellent painted Naval rack numbers on the spine I couldn't pass. Can't decide if I will keep or sell the scabbard. Love bayonets!
 

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Many dealers misattribute these Naval Special bayonets as trainers, due to the fact that most are unmarked and unserial numbered. I got one in a Manions auction several years ago for $35, but only because it was described as a training bayonet.

C/
 

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Here are two naval special bayonets with the distinctive false edge tip and tapered crossguard. One is the usual type encountered (when found at all that is), and the other has the rocking star logo. The rocking star is a bit more cruder build on the metal and the edge is somewhat a bit blunt compared to the other, and was wondering if the rocking star was a trainer variation of the navy special bayonet.
 

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I am no bayonet stud, but I wouldn't go separating the bayonet and scabbard just yet. While most of these are indeed found in the rubberized scabbard I have seen several, including mine, In the same wood scabbard as this. I like the kanji, the kanji on mine so far has been attributed to a float plane training base.
 

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Mike just curious how was white painted kanji on backstrap between grips traced to float plane base? Most are just numbers for rack, owner, rifle etc.
 

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I snapped a pic of it. I got it at the banzai shoot, 2 years ago. A japanese national working in the US is always up for looking at characters needing translation. At first glance he was a bit confused and gave a guess that it was the name of an airfield, or squadron and a rack number. My original notes say that he said it was (and pardone my butchery) "nikawa kuu" number 61. he took a pic and said it would look into it. This past year we were at the shoot and he came right out when i first greeted him and said he found out more about it. the new translation is, what he thinks anyway, is that it is more like "2 kouwa kuu 61" unsure of the specific purpose of the numbers, the "kouwa kuu" means kouwa squdron or airfield. He said kouwa was a seaplane base (cant remember if it was training or operational) in japan and the site while no longer military is in civilian use. They use the ramps to get jetskis in the water. That is the info I have, however I am always willing to hear another opinion or translation.
 

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Mike, those white letterings read "Niko / Ku / 61". I'm not absolutely certain about this, but I think "Niko" may be referring to a location in the Kure city of Hiroshima. "Ku" is probably for the Naval Airforce and 61 has to do with a unit number or some other identification. I do not know how your friend came up with the seaplane base story though.
 

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Just a observation ,Edokko, I can see where someone struggling to put a translation concept across could reach "sea-Planes" from "naval-airforce" as in a location in Kure where planes that go on water were kept..Just a humble suggestion that a slight language barrier might be to blame,I mean finding the english word to express the idea he was reading in japanese...Just my .02 at this ungodly hour.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Mine is pretty easy... 99 -151. Someone told me on Naval helmet numbers (painted in white inside crown) that the first two digits are ship type /class and the next are the rack number. Anybody have any more information on what 99 might be?
 

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Thank you for your input edokko. I understand there is a bit of difference in translation between modern japanese and older japanese characters. There was a bit of confusion on the top character, wether it was one character, or one and the top of the second. He just said the name he thought it may be, corresponded with a floatplane base
 

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Kure City Naval History & Science Museum

Edokko is correct.
二河 = Twin Rivers
There is a Twin Rivers Park in Kure City (呉市, くれし) of Hiroshima: http://park6.wakwak.com/~nipponkaigi-hiro/c-nikou.html
There was a Navy shooting range there during WW2. Your bayonet was probably from 1 of the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service units stationed there.
Kure was the home base of Yamato, the largest battleship ever built. It is still a major port for the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force.
Naval History & Science Museum (Yamato Museum) in Kure City is interesting. The major attraction is a 90’ long, 1/10 model of Yamato.
http://yamato.kure-city.jp/english/e-index.html
The shell on the right is from Yamato. The left one is from Battleship Nagato. Both ships were built in Kure.
 
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