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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
How much mileage do you average out of a bronze phosphor bore brush? I know they're only about $2 but mine are typically worn (bristles shorten dramatically) after 3 cleanings. This seems a little excessive to me and I wanted to make sure it was common.

Is the solvent eating away at them?

Hope this is in the right forum.
 

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Are you trying to use oversized brushes for the bore?

If you match the brush size to the bore, the brushes should last years. I have some brushes from WWII that still work well, if I use them in the correct bore.

IMO, it may sound like a good idea to use an oversized brush for a tighter fit, but unless you are scrubbing out a sewer-pipe bore, it is not needed after the first few cleanings. I use the cheapest bore brushes I can find at the gun shows for the inital clening of a new rifle, because the brushes are not as tightly constructed as the better brands. For regular cleaning, I use Hoppes, or similar bore brushes, in the proper caliber, and they last much longer.
 

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... Is the solvent eating away at them? ...
If you are using Hoppes#9 or something similar that removes jacket material, your solvent is eating your phosphor-bronze brushes.

Kim
 

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I have that same problem the brushes get short and flatted out and are useless after three or four cleanings.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I use foaming bore cleaner and Hoppes 9 and I am using the proper brush size for the rifles. How can I avoid this problem? Only scrub a bore with gun oil and only prior to applying the solvent? If anyone has a cleaning "procedure" that might be useful, I'm all ears. I typically scrub a little, apply solvent, run a few patches, look, scrub, apply solvent, patch, etc.

Also, do you usually clean your bore brush afterwards for storage?

I know these are stupid questions, but I got into guns on my own and nobody ever taught me the basics on this stuff. I've been doing my own thing for the last 3 years. Tonight I was looking at three nubby 7.62 brushes that look more like .22 brushes and realized I should probably ask the experts.

Also, if there is a product that doesn't eat brushes but cleans effectively, please let me know. Should I not use solvents for every cleaning?
 

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Check out the Mosin Nagant websites www.mosinnagant.net and www.7.62x54r.net for tips on cleaning.

For myself, as I mentioned above, I use cheap brushes for the inital scrubbing of a new rifle. For regular cleaning, i use a good quality brush, and, since I only need to remove the fouling that accumulated from the last range session, I do not need the heavy scrubbing.

You may also want to look into using a bit of synthetic pot scrubber to scrub the bores. As it is softer than the metal of the barrel, it will not affect the rifling, but will do a good job in cleaning out the fouling.
 

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I start out with 8MM brushes, after they wear out on 8MM, I use them on 7.62 rifles, then 7MM and finally 6.5 MM. I buy the cheap brushes in bulk.
 

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I would just not worry too much about it. I use the foam bore cleaner which has a solvent that goes after the jacket material, and the brushes too. I probably get three or four cleanings from a brush.

Why worry about a $2.00 bore brush? Think about it: Every time you go to the range, you shoot off many times that worth of ammo.
 

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Any one ever try the bore snakes? Some one suggested I try that (after corrosive surplus) because each pass due to surface area is equal to 75 (or something like that) patches. Plus you can wash and reuse them.
I've though about it but I like seeing the patches come out progressively cleaner until they come out clean, thus I know exactly when I can finish.
 

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I use up several brushes over a year - I use oversize brushes because most of my MN's have typical deep rifling & they have shined up many a bore on my rifles where the average size brush did not - I just buy more brushes.

Pahtu.
 

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I start off with a bore snake to clean out at the range, which also saves some of my brushes at home as I only need a pass or 2 to get what the snake missed. Then I use patches to finish the job.
 

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I wrap a brush with a patch and apply Shooter's Choice (and other solvents) to the wrapped patch; keeps from killing the bore with the raw brush and cleans very well, IMHO.
 

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Beush

I start out with 8MM brushes, after they wear out on 8MM, I use them on 7.62 rifles, then 7MM and finally 6.5 MM. I buy the cheap brushes in bulk.

You beat me to it bullseye. I have also started using what is called a "Tornado Brush" sold by Hoppe's. I find these work pretty good too and last a lot longer. To me brushes are simply consumables. You can get them pretty cheap.
 

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I use Tynex plastic bristle brushes and Tetra bore cleaner.
If you are doing a "first cleanup" on a filthy bore, then burn up a copper brush to attack the worst of the fouling.
Once you get down to the barrel metal, you can start using plastic bristle brushes which are not as effective as brass, but they will survive copper removing chemicals and remove "new" fouling just fine.
Tynex bristles are also much easier on the lands.
 

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bore brushes

I bought some Montana Extreme bore brushes that have dark colored synthetic bristles. They seem to work fine. I got tired of pulling blue patches out of my bores simply from having the amonia type bore clearners eating the bronze phosphor brushes...........Mike
 

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Try blasting your bore brushes with brake cleaner when you're done cleaning. This will wash off the copper-attacking bore cleaner, and will make them last a bit longer. Still, they're expendable items; you can't expect them to last forever.
 

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I started out shooting CMP patches for a Garand then got hooked and transitioned to highpower where I shot a M70 match rifle in 308 before "going to the dark side" - shooting an AR-15.

Both the M70 and my AR-15 have stainless barrels, and SS is quite soft. Except for one Czech VZ24 with a sewer pipe bore that I got "medieval" on, I use the same cleaning procedures on my milsurps as my match rifles.

The routine has changed over time, but is very simple now-- several wet patches pushed through with a Dewey jag to remove powder fouling. Then foaming bore cleaner, usually twice with at least 20 minutes each time for the cleaner to work. Then clean the chamber and bolt, and wet and dry patch the bore with Hoppes until I get a clean patch. Then wet patch the bore with Hoppes and store the rifle muzzle down. If I have shot corrosive ammo, I wipe the bore, bolt, and chamber with a wet Hoppes patch each day for three days after.

I have nylon bristle brushes and phosphor bronze brushes, but only use them when absolutely necessary. With foaming bore cleaner, I do not find it necessary.

Regards,
Meinander
 

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I don't typically use brushes, only a jag and patch, unless it's a neglected bore. In that case I generally wear out one or two brushes on the one rifle. I buy them by the dozen and pay about $1 each, last time I bought any. Either MidwayUSA ("best" quality) or ProShotProducts. I used to clean them with brake cleaner to try to make them last longer but figured I was spending as much on the brake cleaner as I was saving in brush life and just creating a "hazardous materials" situation in the basement. :D
 

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The Hoppe's brushes I pick up at Wally World are for .30 to .32 caliber. They will do 2 to 3 aggressive cleanings on my 93 Turks, Then a couple on the .30 cals, then they are good only for patch holders. Using Romy corrosive requires a brush to get the gook out. I use a soapy swab at the range when done shooting, but it won't budge the gook. I don't use Hoppes #9, but am trying to get the new #9 as it's designed for corrosive ammo.
 
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