Gunboards Forums banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,911 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How strict are the laws regarding MG ownership, is there a larger group of people who cant own them than people who can own handguns. Like if I can own a handgun, can I own a MG? Im wanting to know because I was put into LD classes when I was younger for a developemental disorder. Would this hurt my chances of getting a MG? I was never adjudicated as a mental defective and I have no criminal record.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
Yep, there is no "waiting period" per se. It's just a matter of a small number of Examiners going through a huge number of forms. A couple of years ago when Ken Houchens took over the NFA Branch and they moved from DC to West Virginia, things were moving along super fast. We were getting transfers returned in under 30 days and considering the process, that's about as fast as can be expected.

Then Ken and other folks got promoted, the "old ways" started drifting back in, Obama got elected, people panicked and flooded the system with transfers, and here we are.

In general, if you can go through the NICS process and successfully buy any firearm from a dealer, you are good to go for an NFA purchase. I hope you go for it- it's the most fun you can have with your clothes on!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,761 Posts
You get the form 4 from the ATF, three sets of fingerprints. Send one set and the form to whoever is designated locally. They do a background check and then sign the form. Send the form, two fingerprint cards and a check for $200 to the ATF.
They will also do a background check. If they approve you will get the signed form retu4ned with a pretty $200 stamp on it. then you can go collect your toy.
Now the caveat, The dealer will most likely want money up front before you send in the form since what you are going to buy costa a lot and there might be another customer who wants the same thing.

You can either get the form from the dealer or contact the ATF and they will send you one.
A STRONG hint here, on why do you want it. Saying its for collection purposes is a good idea, instead of "I want ta shoot lots of ammo"

You will need details such as make, model, serial number from the dealer. I would ask those and any other questions from the seller to keep from putting down incorrect information. If in-state, your dealer will know who the local authority is.

Now this all supposes that you live in a state that allows you to own an automatic weapon.
 

·
Diamond Bullet Member
Joined
·
1,548 Posts
In a nut shell:
1) At least 21.
2) Clean criminal record.
3) Live in a State that allows individuals to own live full auto (check County and City laws).
4) Live in an area where you can get the CLEO sign off (there are expensive ways around that).
5) Have lots of money.
If you are good with all five of the above, owning live MG's is not a problem.
Gregg
 

·
Copper Bullet member
Joined
·
1,504 Posts
Gregg, I was talking to a friend of mine (who is also a lawyer) and he said that you can be 18 and purchase an mg IF you are buying from an individual in your state (not a dealer). A friend of his (who works for the ATF) told him that, and he verified it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,911 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I am going to school to be a cop, so this might help me out alot if a CLEO is wary about this. I will probably try to get a MAC10 or Reising SMG. I still got less than 2 years to go though (real fun begins at 21).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,800 Posts
John Sukey writes:

>You get the form 4 from the ATF, three sets of fingerprints. Send one set and the form to whoever is designated locally. They do a background check and then sign the form.<

This is not correct. There is no federal or state requirement that fingerprints be used by local law enforcement to conduct a background check on an applicant. An individual applicant must provide two fingerprint cards with the form 4 application submitted to ATF, and that is all under federal regs. The applicant's local Chief Law enforcement Officer must sign the form 4 attesting that he has no information that indicates the applicant is legally ineligible to possess the MG. There is no local fingerprint requirement that I have ever heard of in any of the states for a background check. A CLEO might do his own version of a background check and hold the form 4 while this is done, but submitting fingerprints is not part of the local process. Fingerprint cards are submitted to ATF and forwarded to the FBI for the purpose of a background check, and specific ATF cards must be used, which can be supplied by your local CIII or by ATF.
The applicant's form 4 must be signed by the local CLEO, which happens in many different way, for example, some states have authorized the state police to do the signature on a "shall sign" basis. The usual procedure is for the applicant to complete the form 4, photo, all front side details about the MG, etc and then take it to the local PD, sheriff or other authorized eligible agent and have it signed. However, before you committ to payment for an MG, you MUST determine if your local CLEO will sign your form 4. If there are other NFA owners in your area of residence, talk to them about the CLEO signature and about whether they have had any problems getting the CLEO to sign the forms. If they have had problems, then don't commit to purchase an MG until you make other arrangements.If yiou have questions about how to proceed with the form 4 and the purchase of an MG, consult with a COMPETENT local NFA dealer, but try to insure that he knows what he is doing. Ask around for references from other NFA owners in your area. There are more and more CIII's who are very new to NFA and who don't have much experience with handling NFA transfers which cna make the process more difficult. The standard ccharge for the CIII's handling of a transfer has been $100 for many years and should not be much more than that.

Bob Naess
Black River Militaria CII
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,911 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
How do I find out if my state is a shall sign state? A math teacher at the school I graduated from lives in my county and has a MP5. Maybe I should pay that school a visit and find out how I go about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
If you run into a problem with your local CLEO, there are ways around it. A lot of people are forming corporations or trusts and then submitting the application in the name of the trust or corp. If you go this way, you don't have to bother with fingerprints, photos, or the CLEO signature. This alone is enough of a benefit to convince a lot of people to go this route, but personally I prefer to do transfers in my own name as long as my local chiefy is cooperative. I suppose I'm just an old fossil, but I don't understand all of the ramifications of ownership via a trust or corporation, so I will avoid it for now.

Either way, you still have to submit the duplicate Form 4s, the Certification of Citizenship form, and a $200 check. If you're going corporate, you need to add a copy of your incorporation paperwork. With a trust, you add a copy of the trust (with Schedule A, a list of the property the trust holds). Going as an individual, you add the photos, print cards, and CLEO certification.

Whatever way you go, it will still take 3-4 months these days.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,337 Posts
I am going to school to be a cop, so this might help me out alot if a CLEO is wary about this. I will probably try to get a MAC10 or Reising SMG. I still got less than 2 years to go though (real fun begins at 21).
Interestingly, out of the two documeted murders committed using an NFA weapon registered to the individual that used it in the crime, "one was a murder committed by a law enforcement officer. On September 15th, 1988, a 13-year veteran of the Dayton, Ohio police department, Patrolman Roger Waller, then 32, used his fully automatic MAC-11 .380 caliber submachine gun to kill a police informant, 52-year-old Lawrence Hileman. Patrolman Waller pleaded guilty in 1990, and he and an accomplice were sentenced to 18 years in prison. (Thanks to the staff of the Columbus, Ohio Public Library for the details of the Waller case.)" (from THR member DoubleTapDrew)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,911 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Interestingly, out of the two documeted murders committed using an NFA weapon registered to the individual that used it in the crime, "one was a murder committed by a law enforcement officer. On September 15th, 1988, a 13-year veteran of the Dayton, Ohio police department, Patrolman Roger Waller, then 32, used his fully automatic MAC-11 .380 caliber submachine gun to kill a police informant, 52-year-old Lawrence Hileman. Patrolman Waller pleaded guilty in 1990, and he and an accomplice were sentenced to 18 years in prison. (Thanks to the staff of the Columbus, Ohio Public Library for the details of the Waller case.)" (from THR member DoubleTapDrew)
Wow, I knew that there was almost no crime history with legal machine guns after the NFA, but I didnt know that a cop commited a murder with his.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top