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Platinum Bullet Member and Certified Curmudgeon
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Discussion Starter #623
1893 Spanish Mauser
Venezuelan M24/30 Frankenbubba
Mauser P08 Luger Code 42
Nice Luger. Phots of the M1893 crest, s/n, and sidewall would help to tell which flavor it is. The bayonet looks Argentine.
 

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11,182 Posts
Greetings from the Kalahari Desert,

Good morning Gents! Here are a few of my favorites that have not appeared earlier in this thread.

Enjoy!

Warmest regards,

JPS


Serbian M1884 Cavalry Carbine

Serbian Carbines - M1884 - 007B.jpg

Serbian M1884 action detail R-4.jpg

Serbian M1908 Cavalry Carbine

Serbian M1908 Carbine 1R.jpg

Serbian M1908 Receiver Detail R-2.jpg

Serbian M1899 Infantry Rifle

Serbian M1899 Infantry Rifle R-7.jpg

Serbian Rifle - Model 1899 Receiver Detail 3-007A.jpg

Serbian M1899-07 Infantry Rifle

Serbian M1899-07 Infantry Rifle R-7.jpg

Serbian Rifle - Model 1899-07 Receiver Detail 4-007A.jpg

Serbian M1910 Infantry Rifle

Serbian M1910 Infantry Rifle R-7.jpg

Serbian M1910 Receiver Detail 2-007D.jpg
 

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Platinum Bullet Member and Certified Curmudgeon
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14,545 Posts
Discussion Starter #625
With that post we take a huge leap from Lugers and M1893 Spanish Mausers to the ultra rare almost one of a kind rarities!

(I guess they didn't want that rear swivel coming loose on the M1908 Serbian cavalry carbine).
 

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Here's my only Mausers, I've got a pretty standard Yugoslavian M24/47 and a very WZ29 with a Danzig 1916 Gewehr 98 receiver. The WZ29 has what seems to be some Polish markings on the bolt and barrel, front end is burnt from God knows what. Bought the thing for $400 and the person I bought it from had no idea what it was and neither did I when I bought it. Any help or info on it would be great. As for the M24/47, nothing special except for it being my first milsurp View attachment 3485193 View attachment 3485195 View attachment 3485195 View attachment 3485197 View attachment 3485199 View attachment 3485201 View attachment 3485197
 

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277 Posts
No pictures came out, Joshmac.
 

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Platinum Bullet Member and Certified Curmudgeon
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14,545 Posts
Discussion Starter #628
Here's my only Mausers, I've got a pretty standard Yugoslavian M24/47 and a very WZ29 with a Danzig 1916 Gewehr 98 receiver. The WZ29 has what seems to be some Polish markings on the bolt and barrel, front end is burnt from God knows what. Bought the thing for $400 and the person I bought it from had no idea what it was and neither did I when I bought it. Any help or info on it would be great. As for the M24/47, nothing special except for it being my first milsurp View attachment 3485193 View attachment 3485195 View attachment 3485195 View attachment 3485197 View attachment 3485199 View attachment 3485201 View attachment 3485197

https://forums.gunboards.com/showthread.php?449345-How-to-Post-Photos
 

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403 Posts
1892/96 Mauser Broomhandle
577,543
All numbers match. Inside grips match.
No import stamp that I could find.
Bore is fantastic.
It is 7.62x25
Slugged the bore.
It's .312
Reposted value question on other Mauser thread.
Terry


Sent from my SM-J727V using Tapatalk
 

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Platinum Bullet Member and Certified Curmudgeon
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14,545 Posts
Discussion Starter #630
Mausers, Only Mausers is a reference thread. Please start a new thread with your value question.

It the bore is outstanding, it was almost certainly relined. That could have been in 9mm or 7.63mm.

The C96 M1930 pistol in post 55 was relined in the US to 7.63mm; the C96 Bolo in post 54 (s/n 645370) has a shot out bore. Both were imported from China and both are on page 2. FWIW, most C96 pistols imported from China had poor bores, mismatched numbers, and import marks. Check your s/n carefully to see if they are original.
 

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Just spent a few minutes browsing through this thread... so much history in here. Thank you for sharing, everyone.
 

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14,545 Posts
Discussion Starter #634 (Edited)
Manchurian Type 13 Mauser Long Rifle

This is one you don't see every day, a Manchurian Type 13 long rifle aka "Mukden Mauser". About 140,000 were made at Mukden Arsenal in 1924-1931. My s/n 69918 (bolt 46260, trigger guard 918) is about halfway through the production. The trigger guard is matching and the first two digits of the bolt s/n are on the bottom side of the bolt arm root.

It was developed from the Steyr M1917 which was an experimental Mauser design with a Mannlicher type magazine. Later Steyr developed the experimental M1931a in 1931 which was about the same as the Type 13. Only Manchuria used the design. The Type 13 has a Mauser type magazine, a unique bolt (same bolt as on both Steyr prototypes), gas holes in the receiver ring, and a dust cover (missing on mine).

Original bayonets, if you can find one, are very expensive. Mine is a substitute using an unmarked Brazilian M1908 bayonet and an unmarked metal scabbard from another bayonet. It looks very similar to the original. My blade length is 11 3/4 inch as compared to the original 11 1/8 inch hooked quillon bayonet. The sling and cleaning rod are reproductions. The frog is Romanian.

Obviously Mukden Arsenal got the basic design and almost certainly manufacturing tools from Steyr.

More info here: https://forums.gunboards.com/showthr...help-requested

and here: https://forums.gunboards.com/showthr...-M-17-30-rifle

and here: http://www.k98kforum.com/showthread....othurn-mystery

The photos show that the bolt knob design was on the original Steyr prototype. The gas holes in the receiver ring were probably a request from Mudken Arsenal. Mudken would have been familiar with the Japanese Type 38 rifle and in fact they made the Type 38 after they quit making the Type 13.

Other than information specific to this model rifle or bayonet, please post any comments on the thread with the same title in the general Mauser Forum (This is a reference sticky).
 

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Platinum Bullet Member and Certified Curmudgeon
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Discussion Starter #635 (Edited)
Polish K98 Short Rifle, Spanish Civil War

This is a real K98, as opposed to all those K98k rifles ignorantly called "K98". It was made in Poland and later sold to Spain for the Spanish Civil War with the Polish crest scrubbed from the receiver. I suspect that, as an export rifle, it was rebuilt by Poland before being sold. Then it was rebuilt again by Spain after the war. The proper designation is probably K98e, like the export WZ29e.

In design, this is a close copy of the German K98a. For quick recognition, the Polish K98 has a square corner on the stacking rod while the German K98a has a rounded corner. The K98, K98a, and K98k are all 7.92X57 caliber. The first two have small ring receivers and the K98k has a large ring receiver.

Poland started making Mausers after they inherited the Danzig Arsenal following WWI. Production began in 1924 at Warsaw Arsenal and later at Radom Arsenal beginning about 1927. The arsenal designation and year on this example were lost when the receiver crest was scrubbed.

The bolt, while the correct type, has markings indicating that it came from a K98a. The German bolt and Polish stock were force matched by Spain at rebuild. The stock is marked with a large letter A. This has been said to indicate "Anarchist", a group on the Republican side of the SCW. It might also be a marking for the Spanish rebuild facility, like the MP8 marking. In any case, the A marking appears on a lot of SCW Polish rifles. (last photo)

The bayonet and scabbard are Polish, the frog and sling are reproductions, and it does not take a cleaning rod due to the far forward bayonet lug design.

The next to last photo shows a German style K98a stacking rod.

Other than information specific to this model rifle or bayonet, please post any comments on the thread with the same title in the general Mauser Forum (This is a reference sticky).
 

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Platinum Bullet Member and Certified Curmudgeon
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14,545 Posts
Discussion Starter #636 (Edited)
Iraqi M48BO Short Rifle, 7.92X57

Made about 1960 by Kragujevac Arsenal. Matching, imported by Fed Ord - probable Israeli capture. Some of these had an Iraqi crest on the receiver ring and others had an Iraqi Jeem marking there; this one has the Jeem. Correct sling, bayonet (BO - unmarked), scabbard, and frog.

The M48BO (BO for "without markings") rifles were made for export without national or manufacturer's markings. Known purchasers were Iraq, Syria, and Egypt but there were others. Most were M48B type with stamped parts but some, like this one, were M48 type with all milled parts.

Other than information specific to this model rifle or bayonet, please post any comments on the thread with the same title in the general Mauser Forum (This is a reference sticky).

Syrian, Iraqi, and Egyptian M48BO Rifles - updated serial number list 11/18/20


Syrian Crest

S1025
S1130
S1148
S1194
S1205
S1226
S1247
S1255
S1299
S1308
S1408
S1427
S1457 (bolt on S1299)
S1562
S1641 (mine)
S1697
S1933
S2128
S2134
S2171
S2190
S2215
S2312
S2382
S2504
S2511
S2519 (bolt on V44707)
S2530
S2597
S2713
S2813
S2839
S2853
S2888
S2956
S3039
S3067
S3120
S3124
V6301
V7874
V8023
V8040
V8276
V15462
V16591
V18573
V22305
V24655
V24790
V25968
V27224
V27382
V27475
V28116
V28825
V40982
V41769
V42313
V43727 (bolt on S1641)
V44128
V44182
V44226
V44227
V44249
V44507
V45683
V45834
V46566
V47778
V48977
V49874


Iraqi Crest

V44934
W16903
W19170
W19268


Iraqi Jeem

V15065
V21394 (mine)
V44994
V44707
V47689
V51821
V55725


Egyptian (with marking disk cutout on stock, blued bolt, buttplate, and rear sight face)

V161
V245
V3424 (mine)
V9601
V19746
V30624
V31392
V35934


3744314


3744315


3744316


3744317


3744318


3744320


3744321


3744322


3744323


3744324
 

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Discussion Starter #638
Egyptian M48BO Short Rifle, 7.92X57

The Yugoslavian manufacturer, Kragujevac Arsenal, made a number of different M48 short rifle post-WWII designs. The M48 action was developed from the FN1924 short rifle which was made for Yugoslavia in a slightly altered version as the M24. The M48 stock was copied from the German K98k. The FN1924, M24, and M48 had intermediate length actions. The K98k had a standard length (longer) action, so M48 and K98k stocks are not interchangeable.

The M48 was made for the Yugoslavian Army in three versions: M48, M48A, and M48B. The M48 was made with all milled parts and marked M48; the M48A was made with some stamped parts and marked M48A; the M48B had more stamped parts but was still marked M48A.

A version called M48BO (BO means "without markings") was made for export which had no Yugoslavian national or manufacturer markings. They were made from all three models, M48, M48A, and M48B, but most seem to have been from the latter two models with stamped parts. They are known to have been sold to Syria, Iraq, Egypt, and others.

The Egyptian contract was never fulfilled due to problems in Egypt. Apparently only a small quantity of rifles actually went to Egypt with the others remaining in Yugoslavia and perhaps being sold to other countries or groups. The details of the Egyptian M48BO rifle are unique. Unlike the others it has a blued bolt, buttplate, and rear sight face; and a marking disk cutout in the stock which is said to be the same size as the Egyptian FN49 marking disk.

My Egyptian M48BO is matching except for the stock, which is an Egyptian stock with the cutout. That suggests that it was actually issued, used, and repaired in Egypt or perhaps some other country. It does not seem to have received much in the way of repairs but somehow the stock was switched.

The bayonet is the BO type, without national or manufacturer markings.

The M48BO Syrian, Iraqi, and Egyptian serial number list can be found in the sticky Mausers, only Mausers on page 32 in post 636.

Other than information specific to this model rifle or bayonet, please post any comments on the thread with the same title in the general Mauser Forum (This is a reference sticky).

3744575


3744576


3744579


3744580


3744583


3744585


3744586
 

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Platinum Bullet Member and Certified Curmudgeon
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14,545 Posts
Discussion Starter #639 (Edited)
Chinese Guandong Arsenal Type 1 Long Rifle, 7.92X57

The Chinese Type 1 long rifle was similar to the Mauser M1907 except that it was chambered for the Chinese 6.8X57 cartridge. The Type 1 rifles (with intermediate length receiver) were first purchased from Mauser. In 1904 production began in China. Type 1 rifles (with standard length receiver) were made by the Gongzian, Shanghai, Guandong, and Guangxi arsenals. The Chinese switched calibers to 7.92X57 in 1915. Presumably at least some of the 6.8X57 rifles were later rebarrelled to 7.92X57.

This is a Chinese Type 1 rifle, made by the Guandong (Kwangtung) Arsenal about 1925. The markings on the receiver ring are too worn to identify the arsenal, but the arsenal can be identified by minor differences in the rear sight. The receiver ring is also marked "I. C. A. C.", the meaning of which is so far unknown. There is one other Type 1 rifle so marked shown in the sticky Chinese Origin Mauser Stock Engraving ID.

The front band is quite narrow with a sling hook and short bayonet lug, like the Brazilian M1907 and Manchurian Type 13 rifles. On this individual Type 1 rifle, a modified bayonet lug has been added to fit the Japanese Type 30 bayonet. That blocks the cleaning rod channel. The serial number is A over 13528.

The sling is Yugoslavian. The bayonet and scabbard are Japanese Type 30 with what may be a Chinese workshop version of a Japanese frog. The frog is much lower quality than a Chinese currently made reproduction Type 30 frog; it came with the bayonet.

For comparison, the next to last photo is a Brazilian M1907 rifle (with intermediate length receiver) and the last photo is a Manchurian Type 13 rifle (with standard length receiver).

Other than information specific to this model rifle or bayonet, please post any comments on the thread with the same title in the general Mauser Forum (This is a reference sticky).

Bill

3745318


3745319


3745320


3745321


3745322


3745323


3745324


3745325



Brazilian M1907 Long Rifle
3745326



Manchurian Type 13 Long Rifle
3745327
 

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14,545 Posts
Discussion Starter #640 (Edited)
First Contract Iranian VZ24 Short Rifle 7.92X57

This rifle is an upgrade for me and replaces the previous one in post 590 on page 30. It is matching and in much better condition than my previous one.

Iran has always been the Iranian name for the country. Persia was used by other countries to mean Iran but in 1935 the Shah requested that the name Iran be used in formal documents by foreign diplomats.

The first contract of 10,000 VZ24 rifles for Iran was in 1929, delivered in January 1930. They had been accepted (but not issued) by the Czechoslovakian Army. Zbrojovka Brno (ZB) had a habit of selling rifles out of the CS Army inventory for quick delivery and replacing them later from new production. Sales continued through 1939 with a total of 30,000 in the three contracts with 10,000 in each contract. This specimen is marked as CS Army accepted in 1928 with a line stamped through the acceptance marking above the receiver s/n. It has a small Iranian crown on the receiver ring instead of the big Iranian crest.

The rifle is a standard VZ24 except for a small Iranian property marking on the receiver ring. Later contract Iranian VZ24 rifles had a full size Iranian crest on the receiver ring. The caliber is the standard 7.92X57. The receiver, bolt, and stock s/n 7278 N2 are matching. The sling is an accurate reproduction of a VZ24 sling and the frog is an accurate reproduction of an Iranian frog.

The first contract VZ24 rifles took the VZ23 Long bayonet (blade edge up). The bayonet now with this rifle came from the third contract. The VZ24 second and third contract rifles took the same type of long bayonet as the VZ98/29 and VZ30 (blade edge down) but the VZ98/29 and VZ30 bayonets were not interchangeable with the VZ24 bayonet. That is because the VZ24 rifle standard cleaning rod extended farther from the stock as compared to the other two. The bayonet hilt of the second and third contract Iranian VZ24 bayonet was made the same as the standard VZ24 bayonet with the cleaning rod channel drilled all the way to the crosspiece (unlike the Iranian VZ98/29 and Iranian VZ30 carbine bayonets). All Iranian bayonets were numbered to the guns, so that was not supposed to matter that the Iranian VZ98/22 and VZ30 bayonets could not be used on the VZ24 rifle (unless the cleaning rod was removed). For visual reference, only the Iranian VZ24 bayonet had cleanout holes in the grips; bayonets for the other two models did not.

Other than information specific to this model rifle or bayonet, please post any comments on the thread with the same title in the general Mauser Forum (This is a reference sticky).

Bill

3745626


3745625


3745627


3745628


3745629


3745630


3745631


3745632


Iranian VZ24 Bayonet over Iranian VZ98/29 Bayonet
3745633


Same, with Iranian VZ24 Rifle over Iranian M1949 Carbine (Similar to VZ30)
Note the cleaning rod length.
3745634
 
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