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My latest Mauser rifle - a Dutch "Wilhelmina" police carbine. Rifle is all-matching and seems to be still in its original configuration. As far as I could see, all parts (where applicable) have a correct FN acceptance and dating stamp from 1947. Bore is a dream - mirror bright with sharp rifling. Not pictured here is the FN flip-up type muzzle protector which came with the rifle. This item is also stamped, with a three-digit number on the front of the flap, but not matching to the rifle's serial number.

Wilhelmina_01.jpg Wilhelmina_02.jpg Wilhelmina_03.jpg Wilhelmina_04.jpg Wilhelmina_05.jpg Wilhelmina_06.jpg Wilhelmina_07.jpg Wilhelmina_08.jpg Wilhelmina_09.jpg Wilhelmina_10.jpg
 

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Could that be an original sling?
I can only tell that it came together with the rifle. According to Anthony Verlinden's book on FN Mausers the correct sling for this rifle should be a 24 mm wide FN pattern sling. My sling has a width of 24 mm and from the overall pattern it looks like the FN design, albeit the buckle looks a little bit different (longer) than those depicted in the FN Mauser book. Also the buckle is made from steel and not from brass. With the rifle also came a correct muzzle protector (as shown on the picture below), stamped with "134" on top of the flap. Such a muzzle protector and the sling were the only accessories ordered by the Dutch together with these rifles.

Another interesting detail is the lack of a bayonet rail on my rifle. All of the (comparatively few) pictures I had seen of these rifles thus far depicted them with a bayonet rail. So at first I thought it might have been cut off here in Germany according to a practice in ca. the 1970s, when our regulations then in force stipulated a "demilitarization" of surplus rifles sold on the civilian market (i.e. removal/cutting-off of bayonet lugs and fixing the rear sights at 300 m by a welding spot). But my rifle only came to Germany from the Netherlands early in this year (as proofed by the German proof house stampings), so that old regulation couldn't be the reason. A lengthy internet research shed light on this point in the end. In a very detailed essay (in Dutch language, but due to the close similarity between Dutch and German I'm able to understand most of it) describing the equipment of Dutch police units over the last 100 years or so there was clearly pointed out that these rifles (both Queen Wilhelmina and Queen Juliana carbines) were delivered with and without bayonet rails. Also stated in this essay was that the Royal Dutch Police Museum has rifle #1176 (just 29 numbers away from mine) without bayonet rail. In the end I also found pictorial evidence of such a rifle from the collection of the Dutch Army Museum (number on the picture is museum's inventory number, not the rifle's s/no.):

Carbine_Rijkspolitie_Wilhelmina_no_bayonet_000809_jpg_1200x630_q85.jpg

In the FN Mauser book and in Ball's Mauser book is stated that the Dutch police neither ordered any bayonets for those carbines, nor used bayonets with them. So it seems that my rifle is in original condition - the more because the nose cap also is stamped with the correct FN acceptance mark (a partly boxed "7" for 1947) in accordance with other parts of my rifle. In 1947 the FN factory was still heavily suffering from the impacts of war and German occupation, plus a serious material shortage and had to use (up) every half-finished or finished components from pre-war and wartime production still available. And nose caps from those times most likely were equipped with bayonet rails - but were nevertheless fitted to the Dutch police carbines despite the fact that they weren't intended to be equipped with bayonets, simply because these parts were available. A strong hint in this direction are the Venezuelan target rifles also made at around 1947 which all were equipped with nose caps with bayonet rails, despite the fact that their barrels were totally unsuited to accomodate a bayonet. The nose caps without bayonet rail seem to be either modified (needing additional production steps) or newly-made parts (as is indicated by the 1947 acceptance stamp on my rifle) and are clearly a minority when taking into account how difficult pictures of such rifles are to find...
 

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Discussion Starter #607
ZAR M1893 (Mod. 1896) Carbine, 7X57

This is a M1893 carbine even though it is labeled "Mod. Mauser 1896" on the siderail. It was made by Loewe and shipped to the ZAR (South African Republic) in September 1896. Apparently Loewe at the time was using the year of manufacture to indicate the latest and greatest model although it is unchanged from an 1893 made M1893 carbine. Serial numbers were 1 to 5000 and later DWM ZAR carbines were 5001 to 7000. That is 5000 carbines from Loewe and 2000 from DWM for the ZAR, total 7000, and none for the OVS (Orange Free State) although ZAR later sold some to the OVS.

I suspect this is one that was sold to the OVS because it has a bent bolt s/n 7508 that came from a DWM OVS long rifle. The last few long rifle shipments to the OVS had bent bolt handles like the Chilean ZAR and OVS rifles. Serial numbers were OVS 2901 to OVS 7900 shipped 1897-1899. OVS long rifle s/n 7237 is known to be matching and has a bent bolt. The OVS s/n prefix was marked on the receiver ring only.

Like many Boer rifles and carbines, this one has a stock carving: Nothing fancy, just the letter P - probably the first letter of the user's last name. The barrel, receiver, and trigger guard are marked with the s/n 1873. The bolt, as already mentioned, is s/n 7508 and the floorplate is s/n 60. The stock does not show a s/n.

There are no import or other post Boer markings. I have the original handguard but it is missing the top part between the rear sight and receiver. I put a Swedish M1894 carbine handguard on it which I expected to be exactly the same but it required some minor modifications to fit correctly. Both sling swivels came to me on the right side of the stock. I put them back on the left side as they came from Loewe. They are designed to be reversible without modification. The cleaning rod was missing and I replaced it with a correct one.

The sling is French; it is the only one I had that was short enough to fit. I am not happy with the look of it and will probably replace it with a shortened post war used German G3 sling as I have done on other rifles. They look authentic enough. The ZAR ordered long sawtooth bayonets but they did not make it through the British blockade, so the carbines never had bayonets. They were later sold by Bannerman in 1927 for $2.35 each with scabbard.

I have no clue as to why Gunboards turned the first photo upside down.
 

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Discussion Starter #608
Paraguayan M1927 SHORT Rifle, 7.65X53

About two years ago I saw my first Paraguayan M1927 short rifle, posted by Ike27 (link below). I have been watching for one since then and recently found one from Eisel (gray blanket) on Gunbroker. It was made by Oviedo in 1927-1928. The rifle is in reasonably decent condition with s/n B87 matching receiver, trigger guard, and bolt. The bayonet lug adapter is unfortunately s/n 82. The stock has no visible number but does have a worn Paraguayan crest. It has no Spanish rebuild markings nor Interarms caliber marking on the barrel but it just about has to be one that was sold to Paraguay and then sold back to Spain (see below) before being imported to the US.

It does not appear to be rebuilt and is in 7.65X53 caliber. Possibly only the long rifles were recalibered to 7.92X57 in Spain. It may be that the long rifles were rebarrelled to 7.92X57 and there were no short rifle barrels in that caliber handy for the Paraguayan short rifles. Things would have been rushed during the Spanish Civil War. They did not mark it as being an odd caliber. Only 7,119 rifles were sold back to Spain of the 8,463 long rifles and 1,900 short rifles originally sold to Paraguay. I wonder if Paraguay sent Spain 7,116 long rifles and only 3 short rifles? That would not bother me.

I bought a M1909 Argentine bayonet/scabbard/frog for it, since it is very similar to the Belgian made Paraguayan M1927 bayonet (made of unobtanium – but I do have photos of one s/n B0037 below).

In the past I held the opinion that there were about 20,000 combined Paraguayan M1927 rifles, short rifles, and carbines made in the A and B blocks. Further research (with help from Okrana) has shown that likely to be incorrect. There is also the problem that various sources say there were M1927 long rifles, short rifles, and carbines made for Paraguay. I think this is incorrect; only long and short rifles are known and the non-existent carbines came from sources saying that “rifles and carbines” were made, actually meaning “long and short rifles”.

I know of no A block M1927 long or short rifles found; all known are B block. A possible reason could be that Paraguay already had A prefix serial number M1907 rifles; they ordered the M1927 rifles and carbines to begin with B prefix serial numbers to avoid serial number duplication in the M1907 and M1927 long rifles.

The most likely quantities reported are 8,463 long rifles and 1,900 short rifles for a total of 10,363 M1927. That would suggest a B block of at least 10,363 long and short rifles (called “carabinas de caballeria”, or cavalry carbines). The idea that A block rifles went to Paraguay and B block rifles stayed in Spain has been proven wrong, because it is known that Paraguay sold 7,119 M1927 back to Spain in 1936. The M1927 imported to the US from Spain were from the B block of combined long and short rifles that Spain sent to Paraguay in 1927 and 1928.

Known Paraguayan M1927 serial numbers:

Long rifles: B305, B612, B985, B2104, B2343, B2521, B2972, B3048, B3260, B4552, B4884, B5267, B6223, B6747, B7090, B7121, B7331, and B8135 (trigger guard).
Short rifles: B87, B667, and B3447 with trigger guard B7246

Also see short rifle thread:
https://forums.gunboards.com/showthr...27-Short-Rifle

And see long rifle in post #341 at:
https://forums.gunboards.com/showthr...-Mausers/page8

References:
Mauser Military Rifles of the World, 5th Edition
Rifles of the World
Mauser Bolt Rifles
Arms for Spain
The Chaco War
The Spanish Mauser Family
La Defensa del Chaco
Artemio Mortera’s article “Mauser Oviedo 1927: El mataparaguayos”, in the Spanish Journal of Military History, No.100, 2008

Gunboards posted the first of four small thumbnail photos of a Paraguayan M1927 bayonet out of sequence.
 

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I realize it's an old topic. Mine doesn't show in your list it's a 524 Brazilian Itajuba M954 Mq.30 short rifle, Kurtz short action, 6.60" between screws, 1.388" ring diameter ahead of magazine opening and 1.265" behind of mag opening. Top receiver opening to insert cartridge is only 2.25", action is 7 1/2" long. Barrel must be a replacement and is chambered in .308 x 1.5. I can't find any match in Mausers books.
 

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Discussion Starter #610
It might be that they used an intermediate length M1907 receiver. See post #318 on page 8, Mauser M1907 Brazilian long rifle, 7X57, Mauser crest, c.1907.

Also see post #524 on page 12,
Brazilian Itajuba M954 Mq.30 short rifle, .30-06 (7.62X63), c.1954. Blue indicates not my rifle.
 

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Hi, first time posting on this forum. Apologies in advance if I'm posting this in the wrong place; Mods - if so, please feel free to move my post. I inherited a few old firearms, one of which is an old Mauser. I've attached some photos. It's in rough shape, but I was hoping someone here might be able to help identify its provenance. Any input on age, country of origin, and if it's worth anything more than its weight in scrap are appreciated. View attachment 3398939 View attachment 3398947 View attachment 3398949 View attachment 3398953
 

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Discussion Starter #612
Hi, first time posting on this forum. Apologies in advance if I'm posting this in the wrong place; Mods - if so, please feel free to move my post. I inherited a few old firearms, one of which is an old Mauser. I've attached some photos. It's in rough shape, but I was hoping someone here might be able to help identify its provenance. Any input on age, country of origin, and if it's worth anything more than its weight in scrap are appreciated. View attachment 3398939 View attachment 3398947 View attachment 3398949 View attachment 3398953
Welcome to the forum. Your photos did not come through - and you post would have been better placed as a new post in the Mauser Forum, rather than as a reply to a reference sticky. For simplicity, I suggest you post again in the main forum and hopefully your photos will come through on the second try. More will see your post there.
 

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Discussion Starter #613 (Edited)
Chilean M1907 Short Rifle, 7X57

I bought this DWM M1907 short rifle from a Gunboards member who told me that the dealer he bought it from (also a Gunboards member) said that it had come from the SAMCO auction and that it was one of a kind in that auction. It was in an odd lot of guns and was not mentioned by type in the very lengthy SAMCO auction list which I carefully reviewed. It was advertised on the Gunboards Trader and I bought it about a half hour after the ad was posted.

The only reference I can find for this rifle is in the 1911 ALFA catalog of which I have a reprint. As identified in that catalog, this is a DWM M1907 "carbine". I would call it a short rifle because it has a barrel length of 22 inches and the sling is mounted on the bottom rather than on the side. The Chilean M1895 and M1912 short rifles also have 22 inch barrels. I suspect ALFA labeled it as a carbine and did not state the barrel length (only showing a photo) because carbines were easier for them to sell to the public than were short rifles. With my rifle having a serial number of 252 I think the ones ALFA was selling may have been a DWM overrun from a small contract of maybe 250 or so.

If Chile did have a small contract for these, the time frame would have been in between the M1895 and M1912 rifles purchased for their military. It is a unique 98 type design with no bayonet lug, no provision for a cleaning rod, a short handguard, and a square cut front end on the rear sight with no handguard screw (the handguard has a spring barrel clip like the long handguards have). I have never seen a handguard like this on any other Mauser.

The book Rifles of the World by John Walter shows Chile buying "small numbers" of DWM M1904 "standard 1898 pattern export Mauser" rifles with front band altered to accept M1895 bayonet. They could have bought some M1907 short rifles along with those. The designation "M1907" comes from the ALFA catalog; my rifle is not marked with a model designation. So far it seems to be the only example remaining.

I think my carbine was probably sold to Chile because it (1) has a Chilean M1912 short rifle bolt, (2) is in the 7mm caliber used by Chile, (3) has an almost invisible SAMCO import mark, and (4) the SAMCO final inventory list had many Chilean rifles, including M1912 short rifles. It has pre-1913 commercial rather than military proof marks, suggesting that it might have been a police contract. Aside from the bolt, it is matching.

As a summary, we know that at least 252 were made; that it is 7mm; that ALFA was selling some in 1911 and labeled them as M1907; that it was imported by SAMCO; that it has a Chilean M1912 short rifle bolt (bent bolt handle); and that SAMCO imported a lot of rifles from Chile (7mm) and Argentina (7.65mm), but none from Brazil (7mm).

I made an earlier post on this rifle in December 2018 when only auction photos were available.

Please post any replies in the post by the same title in the regular Mauser forum. "Mausers, Only Mausers" is a reference sticky.
 

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Discussion Starter #614 (Edited)
Paraguayan M1907 Long Rifle, 7.92X57 (was 7.65X53)

Paraguay never sold their Mausers on the open market (I suppose they are rusting away in Paraguay). That makes them very hard to find but they did send some to Spain to support the Republican side in the Spanish Civil War. The stock is marked with an A for the Spanish "Anarchist" group which fought against the Nationalist side (Franco). This one was made by Waffenfabrik Mauser and rebuilt by Spain after the SCW; the caliber was changed from 7.65X53 to 7.92X57 at some point by Spain with a new barrel which now shows much use. According to Jon Speed, 7600 long rifles and 1500 carbines were sold by Mauser Orberndorf to Paraguay in 1907. Another 10,100 rifles were ordered in 1913 but they were sent to Turkey.

There is some confusion about the clip guide that was added to the receiver bridge. Some have said that the guide was added by Turkey but I have seen a photo of one that was marked with a Paraguayan star. In any case, my example never had a clip guide added. You can see the Paraguayan star markings in the trigger guard photo. A unique feature of the M1907 is the Lange rear sight.

This Mauser is not as rare as my last one (DWM M1907 short rifle - one example known so far) but it is rare enough that I am overjoyed to have it. The s/n is 3720. The bolt and stock were force matched at the Spanish rebuild but marked with the incorrect number 5720 instead of 3720. It must have been a Monday or Friday gun. The barrel is marked 3720 with an X in front which I assume means replacement barrel (changed by Spain) or maybe that X is a firing proof mark.

The underside of the bolt handle root has the same script MB that appears on both sides of the receiver ring. So far I have seen Paraguayan star markings on the bolt arm, bolt sleeve, safety, extractor, extractor collar, bolt release, trigger guard, floorplate, and rear sight. Numbers don't match. The crest is complete but not deep enough on the right side to hold the white crayon applied by the seller.

This one was definitely not a steal and was closer to a fair price than to a good deal - but I would not let it go. You don't see these every day.

The bayonet used is a Spanish M1943, made by FN Toledo, appropriate for a Spanish rebuild. Paraguayan bayonets are made of unobtainium.

Photos of John Wall's excellent condition rifle are here: https://forums.gunboards.com/showthr...1907-questions

I made an earlier post on this rifle in January 2019 when only auction photos were available.

Please post any replies in the post by the same title in the regular Mauser forum. "Mausers, Only Mausers" is a reference sticky.
 

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Belgian 1889/36

There was one of these in an earlier post but it looks like the pics are gone. Anyway, the Belgians converted ~60,000 1889's to this configuration after adopting the 1935 Mauser model. This one was converted using a carbine bolt but is otherwise representative. They cut the old serial number out of the stock and filled in the wood then applied the new serial number, and filled in the stock with new wood where the barrel shroud used to be.
 

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Thanks for posting. The usual pattern had a gas shield added to the bolt.

Another M1889/36 with photos is post 63 on page 2. The index is in post 1 on page 1.
I thought I checked and the pics didn't come up. Obviously mistaken, but this computer is glitchy like that sometimes.
 
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