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Mauser22
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Posted - 06/11/2007 : 11:42:53 AM
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This is the 10th in a series of posts on the HVA .22 Rifles

Husqvarna Model 1622 and 1722
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In approximately 1956, Husqvarna introduced the Model 1622. It was produced until 1965 when the 1722 was brought out. At least three variations of the 1622 have been observed. This was the same serial number range as the Model 622 introduced in 1949.
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On this early 1622 there are no scope grooves. (Note the author changed the dot color from original yellow to red.)
The first variation is identical to a Model 622 except for the safety. The full fore end type stock as used on the Model 622 is retained. Receivers are not grooved and the HVA Logo is located atop the chamber on the receiver. The only difference is the introduction of a sliding bar type safety on the right side of the receiver. This safety has a hooked portion that engages the lengthened trigger retention pin positively blocking the trigger from being pulled. The strange thing is that the “fire” position is aft. To place the gun on “Safe the safety is pushed forward. This is exactly backwards to the center fire models of the same period. A yellow dot is inlaid into the stock to serve as a visual warning that the safety is in the fire position. The tab on the slide is virtually identical to the center fire models (ie 1640)

The second variation uses a different style stock. Beginning around the 13XXX range, stocks have a schnabel fore end and slimmer over all lines reducing the weight of the rifle. The receivers on this first and second variation 1622 are not grooved for scope mounts.
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This manner of marking the barrel top with "Husqvarna Vapenfabriks, A.B. Kal .22" is common to the Models 622, 1622 and 1722.
The third variation of Model 1622(observed around the 148XX range) has the receiver grooved and the HVA logo moved to the rear of the receiver.
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Illustrated here is the 1622 Safety (top) and 1722 Safety (bottom). (Note the author has changed the color from the original yellow dots to red due to personal preference.) Also, the third variation of 1622 receiver top looks identical to the 1722 depicted here. Again, the only difference is the safety.

Husqvarna Model 1722

Late in 1964 or early 1965 Husqvarna appears to have recognized the blunder of the safety being opposite direction operation to the center fires and changed this. This was accomplished by adding a second pin to the rear of sear, the sole purpose of which is to engage the hook on the slide. That is the only real difference in a Model 1722 and third variation Model 1622 noted. Very late Model 1722’s also use a blued simplified sling swivel that accommodates a 1 inch sling. All other models of .22 use the very nice case colored ¾ inch swivels typical of all early HVA rifles.
Download Attachment:
45.18 KB
Both rifles are in the safe position. Top is the 1722 and bottom the 1622.
On all observed examples of Model 622, 1622, and 1722 the left rear receiver is drilled and tapped to mount a peep or diopter rear sight. The wood line on the stock obscures the holes on some examples. On others it appears to have been factory relieved for the sight. (Perhaps indicative that some guns came supplied with the sight. The catalogs and brochures observed indicate that the holes accommodate the Lyman 57. Other makes to include certain models of Redfield will also mate with the holes.
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47.71 KB
Top is old style case colored swivels typical of HVA Rifles. Bottom is late 1722 with larger sling loop.

Overall observations on the Models 622, 1622 and 1722.

The bolt remains unchanged throughout production of all three models. The dual extractors are very positive. The ejector is rugged and functions well. The front portion of the bolt does not rotate. Lift and draw of the bolt are smooth and short.
The firing pin is well encased within the bolt body. The trigger guard and magazine holder on all three models are of cast alloy.
Download Attachment:
30.46 KB
Some appear to be enameled and some appear anodized black. The rear sight is of high quality and accommodates zeroing with “center of mass” hold and high velocity ammunition.
(Note: One very early Models of 622 was observed with a stamped steel rear leaf sight screwed to the barrel. One example of Model 1622 had a tangent type rear sight that appeared to be factory installed.) The grooved receiver models coupled with the short bolt lift and throw facilitate low to the bore scope mounting. Metal finish, wood fit and overall balance of the guns make the gun quite comfortable to carry. Some influence of trigger pull can be achieved by the degree of tightness of the sear retaining screw. However, I have found it to be quite satisfactory with the screw tight. All of the examples I have shot are very accurate for a sporting/hunting rifle.

Having shot and examined all three models the only faults I find with the design are as follows:

The action appears to be very prone to dry fire damage. Two examples were found to have the breech face peened by the firing pin resulting in frequent miss-fires. These models should not be dry fired without a spent case or dummy round chambered.

The location of the clip release and forward movement to release the clip, result in the clip readily falling out if bumped during use. Many examples have been imported with the clip missing as a result of this. (See previous post on modifying the Remington 511 clip for use in these HVA Models.)

The early models with the “backward” safety require additional thought and caution if the shooter is used to the center fire rifles.

A very minor and personal issue is the use of yellow dots to indicate the safety is in the fire position. (This I easily remedied to my personal preference by changing the dots from yellow to red for the fire position).

One other personal issue is that It is disappointing to me that as well made and accurate as these rifles are, Husqvarna did not see fit to use a good grade of walnut on the stocks. This of course is not unique to HVA. Many other makers of .22 rifles during this period, used stained hardwoods to keep the guns cost competitive in world markets.
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A typical example of 1622/1722 with rear sight removed and scope mounted.


Good Collecting!!!!!!!!!
 

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Author Topic
Mauser22
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USA
396 Posts
Posted - 06/11/2007 : 11:42:53 AM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

This is the 10th in a series of posts on the HVA .22 Rifles

Husqvarna Model 1622 and 1722
Download Attachment:
36.8 KB
In approximately 1956, Husqvarna introduced the Model 1622. It was produced until 1965 when the 1722 was brought out. At least three variations of the 1622 have been observed. This was the same serial number range as the Model 622 introduced in 1949.
Download Attachment:
23.83 KB
On this early 1622 there are no scope grooves. (Note the author changed the dot color from original yellow to red.)
The first variation is identical to a Model 622 except for the safety. The full fore end type stock as used on the Model 622 is retained. Receivers are not grooved and the HVA Logo is located atop the chamber on the receiver. The only difference is the introduction of a sliding bar type safety on the right side of the receiver. This safety has a hooked portion that engages the lengthened trigger retention pin positively blocking the trigger from being pulled. The strange thing is that the “fire” position is aft. To place the gun on “Safe the safety is pushed forward. This is exactly backwards to the center fire models of the same period. A yellow dot is inlaid into the stock to serve as a visual warning that the safety is in the fire position. The tab on the slide is virtually identical to the center fire models (ie 1640)

The second variation uses a different style stock. Beginning around the 13XXX range, stocks have a schnabel fore end and slimmer over all lines reducing the weight of the rifle. The receivers on this first and second variation 1622 are not grooved for scope mounts.
Download Attachment:
17.21 KB
This manner of marking the barrel top with "Husqvarna Vapenfabriks, A.B. Kal .22" is common to the Models 622, 1622 and 1722.
The third variation of Model 1622(observed around the 148XX range) has the receiver grooved and the HVA logo moved to the rear of the receiver.
Download Attachment:
43.28 KB
Illustrated here is the 1622 Safety (top) and 1722 Safety (bottom). (Note the author has changed the color from the original yellow dots to red due to personal preference.) Also, the third variation of 1622 receiver top looks identical to the 1722 depicted here. Again, the only difference is the safety.

Husqvarna Model 1722

Late in 1964 or early 1965 Husqvarna appears to have recognized the blunder of the safety being opposite direction operation to the center fires and changed this. This was accomplished by adding a second pin to the rear of sear, the sole purpose of which is to engage the hook on the slide. That is the only real difference in a Model 1722 and third variation Model 1622 noted. Very late Model 1722’s also use a blued simplified sling swivel that accommodates a 1 inch sling. All other models of .22 use the very nice case colored ¾ inch swivels typical of all early HVA rifles.
Download Attachment:
45.18 KB
Both rifles are in the safe position. Top is the 1722 and bottom the 1622.
On all observed examples of Model 622, 1622, and 1722 the left rear receiver is drilled and tapped to mount a peep or diopter rear sight. The wood line on the stock obscures the holes on some examples. On others it appears to have been factory relieved for the sight. (Perhaps indicative that some guns came supplied with the sight. The catalogs and brochures observed indicate that the holes accommodate the Lyman 57. Other makes to include certain models of Redfield will also mate with the holes.
Download Attachment:
47.71 KB
Top is old style case colored swivels typical of HVA Rifles. Bottom is late 1722 with larger sling loop.

Overall observations on the Models 622, 1622 and 1722.

The bolt remains unchanged throughout production of all three models. The dual extractors are very positive. The ejector is rugged and functions well. The front portion of the bolt does not rotate. Lift and draw of the bolt are smooth and short.
The firing pin is well encased within the bolt body. The trigger guard and magazine holder on all three models are of cast alloy.
Download Attachment:
30.46 KB
Some appear to be enameled and some appear anodized black. The rear sight is of high quality and accommodates zeroing with “center of mass” hold and high velocity ammunition.
(Note: One very early Models of 622 was observed with a stamped steel rear leaf sight screwed to the barrel. One example of Model 1622 had a tangent type rear sight that appeared to be factory installed.) The grooved receiver models coupled with the short bolt lift and throw facilitate low to the bore scope mounting. Metal finish, wood fit and overall balance of the guns make the gun quite comfortable to carry. Some influence of trigger pull can be achieved by the degree of tightness of the sear retaining screw. However, I have found it to be quite satisfactory with the screw tight. All of the examples I have shot are very accurate for a sporting/hunting rifle.

Having shot and examined all three models the only faults I find with the design are as follows:

The action appears to be very prone to dry fire damage. Two examples were found to have the breech face peened by the firing pin resulting in frequent miss-fires. These models should not be dry fired without a spent case or dummy round chambered.

The location of the clip release and forward movement to release the clip, result in the clip readily falling out if bumped during use. Many examples have been imported with the clip missing as a result of this. (See previous post on modifying the Remington 511 clip for use in these HVA Models.)

The early models with the “backward” safety require additional thought and caution if the shooter is used to the center fire rifles.

A very minor and personal issue is the use of yellow dots to indicate the safety is in the fire position. (This I easily remedied to my personal preference by changing the dots from yellow to red for the fire position).

One other personal issue is that It is disappointing to me that as well made and accurate as these rifles are, Husqvarna did not see fit to use a good grade of walnut on the stocks. This of course is not unique to HVA. Many other makers of .22 rifles during this period, used stained hardwoods to keep the guns cost competitive in world markets.
Download Attachment:
98.36 KB
A typical example of 1622/1722 with rear sight removed and scope mounted.


Good Collecting!!!!!!!!!
Hi Kriggevær
Have just picked up a HVA .22LR from a dealer who provided no information on the rifle other than it might be okay as a farm rifle. The rifle is in pretty good condition and shoots very nice groups so I am very encouraged. From your description it is from the 3rd variation of the 1622, would it be possible to re-post your photos?

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Hello wanderdone and welcome to the forum. The original post was by another of our illustrious members, Mauser22. I believe I have the photos that go with the text and will have to search my hard drive and see if I can find them. If Mauser22 stops by maybe he can post them.

UPDATE - I found a photo showing the differences between 1st/2nd variations compared to the 3rd variation.

NOTE - This photo is from Mauser22's excellent work on Husqvarna rimfire rifles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I am biased, but the Husqvarna rimfire rifles are very high quality well crafted rifles that, in my experience, are the equal or better of anything being made today in rimfire bolt gun realm.
 

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Thanks kriggevær from the photo it is definitely the 3rd variation of the 1622. I agree with your opinion of the quality of the rilfe. I put through another 50 rounds this afternoon, again with excellent results. I thought I was buying on old rifle that I could throw around and ended up with a quality firearm that I am gaining great respect for.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Now, you need a Husqvarna centerfire rifle and there are a lot to choose from. And then a Husqvarna shotgun, and then a Husqvarna pistol...:D
 
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