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Discussion Starter #1
Hello! I was wondering If I could get some help on my Mauser. Its a Czech made vz. 24, but with a German rear sight, turned down bolt handle, and stock. So, I have recently bought a different stock (the one on the rifle had been sporterized, then repaired and put back into original configuration). Anyway, I have been having issues with the rear cupped buttplate, the band spring, and the front band.

  • First of all, the buttplate doesn't fit the stock correctly. The screw holes don't quite line up either.
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  • You can see how it doesn't fit, along with the screws not going in all the way. It seems like the screw pitch is different than the threads in the stock.
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  • Second, The band spring doesn't seem to fit because the handguard wood is a little too long. Where should I file down the wood at?
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  • Along with the other side of the bandspring here (that's not fitting), you can see this is about as far as I can get the front band on. What needs to happen to get the front band on?
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Any help would be much appreciated!
Thanks, Cody
 

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Need photos, overall left and right views, plus any markings.

Your stock, handguard, and bands are K98k, not VZ24. German rear sight? Maybe your entire rifle is a German K98k.

It's not rocket science, but it is still good to inquire first if you are not sure of what to do.

Basically:
The step in the front of the handguard needs to match the location of the step in the stock. As is, the handguard pushes the rear band too far forward, making the front end of the band spring not clear the rear edge of the bayonet lug (The bayonet lug is the lug itself and also the part under the front band). First check to see that the handguard is fully seated under the handguard retention flange on the top front of the rear sight. If pushing the handguard back does not solve the problem, then:

1. Remove some wood from the rear of the handguard (rifle oriented with trigger down). Remove enough wood so that the step in the front of the handguard matches the step in the stock with handguard installed.

2. Install handguard and rear band, then band spring. You may find that the spring will now clear the bayonet lug. If the band spring does not clear the bayonet lug, remove enough metal from the front edge of the band spring until it does.

3. If the screws for your buttplate don't line up with the holes in the stock, enlarge the holes. You may then find that the screws are too loose and will need to put wooden matchsticks into the holes so that the screws will tighten.

Every collector/gunsmith has to start somewhere.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Need photos, overall left and right views, plus any markings.

Your stock, handguard, and bands are K98k, not VZ24. German rear sight? Maybe your entire rifle is a German K98k.

It's not rocket science, but it is still good to inquire first if you are not sure of what to do.

Basically:
The step in the front of the handguard needs to match the location of the step in the stock. As is, the handguard pushes the rear band too far forward, making the front end of the band spring not clear the rear edge of the bayonet lug (The bayonet lug is the lug itself and also the part under the front band). First check to see that the handguard is fully seated under the handguard retention flange on the top front of the rear sight. If pushing the handguard back does not solve the problem, then:

1. Remove some wood from the rear of the handguard (rifle oriented with trigger down). Remove enough wood so that the step in the front of the handguard matches the step in the stock with handguard installed.

2. Install handguard and rear band, then band spring. You may find that the spring will now clear the bayonet lug. If the band spring does not clear the bayonet lug, remove enough metal from the front edge of the band spring until it does.

3. If the screws for your buttplate don't line up with the holes in the stock, enlarge the holes. You may then find that the screws are too loose and will need to put wooden matchsticks into the holes so that the screws will tighten.

Every collector/gunsmith has to start somewhere.
Thanks Geladen for the reply! Thanks for the tips, they will be used! Alot of these parts on the rifle are German, I can confirm. For example, the bayonet lug has a waffenamt. Barrel is marked "MK", I'm pretty sure. The receiver is Czech as you can see. Here are some more pictures:
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Your barrelled action is a post WWII VZ98N (basically a K98k). Not a VZ24. Your stock is from a K98k. The VZ98N stock is not drilled for a cleaning rod. I can't see your stock very clearly but it looks like it is made for a flat rather than a cupped buttplate (an earlier stock). Stocks were robbed from VZ98N (cheaper rifles) by collectors to replace sporterized stocks on Kriegsmodell (late war) K98k (more valuable) rifles. Then the robbed VZ98N got whatever stock was available, often an RC K98k stock.

I think you need a flat buttplate for your stock. Your trigger guard is a later stamped K98k trigger guard, not VZ98N nor VZ24.

First two photos VZ98N (cupped buttplate)
Second 2 photos K98k (flat buttplate)
Third two photos Chinese K98k (flat buttplate)
Last two photos K98k (RC) (cupped buttplate)

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I see a stamped 206 on the left side of the stock.

The numbers stamped on the stock indicate the stocks source is a post war rebuilt mauser. On an RC a serial number is deeply and boldly stamped, horizontally or parallel to the barrel on the left side of the stock. Original K98k rifles do not have a SN stamped at this location on the stock. Most obvious, the stock’s serial number application is a dead give away to a Yugo rebuild. Similar to a Russian Capture, it is found deeply stamped into the left side of the Yugo rebuilt K98k stock between the take down washer and the butt plate; however, its position is vertical, parallel to the butt plate. In contrast, on the Russian capture it is located horizontal and parallel to the barrel. So I think this is a Yugo stock, If flat with no ridge I would say it had a flat butt plate, if a thin inletted ridge is around the butt, I would say a cupped buttcap. Where did you get this stock, and I am not sure the hand guard is a match to that lower. What does the back part of the wood look like? If you have a vz 24, why not use a VZ 24 stock? I am not expert, just speculation.
Look at the reference library photos of a K98k Czech Post-War Czech K98k (Karabiner 98) Rifle

As stated, maybe you have a scrubbed k98k with a Yugo k98k post war lower and an incorrect hand guard. I would think a Yugo butt plate should match a Yugo stock. Do the ding and dents and color match on the hand guard and lower; especially dents that fall over both pieces? Here is a video that shows a Yugo K98 with an M48. But there are some nice views of the sight and bands on the Yugo K98k;

Did the stock come with the hand guard as a set? Also the barrel bands? Or is it pieced together stuff?
You got to ID the action. I am not sure but, Yugo K98 stocks were funny. While not sure, I think I remember that the Yugoslav rebuilt/ modified K98k stocks are 2/3" too short for the original German 98k.They were shortened to use the 23" new Serbian 1924 replacement barrels. ???? Some have German barrels others have new Yugo barrel- I got two Yugo capture K98ks that were rebarreled. The experts may be able to lead you in a correct direction.
 

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The numbers stamped on the stock indicate the stocks source is a post war rebuilt mauser. On an RC a serial number is deeply and boldly stamped, horizontally or parallel to the barrel on the left side of the stock. Original K98k rifles do not have a SN stamped at this location on the stock. Most obvious, the stock’s serial number application is a dead give away to a Yugo rebuild. Similar to a Russian Capture, it is found deeply stamped into the left side of the Yugo rebuilt K98k stock between the take down washer and the butt plate; however, its position is vertical, parallel to the butt plate. In contrast, on the Russian capture it is located horizontal and parallel to the barrel. So I think this is a Yugo stock, If flat with no ridge I would say it had a flat butt plate, if a thin inletted ridge is around the butt, I would say a cupped buttcap. Where did you get this stock, and I am not sure the hand guard is a match to that lower. What does the back part of the wood look like? If you have a vz 24, why not use a VZ 24 stock? I am not expert, just speculation.
Look at the reference library photos of a K98k Czech Post-War Czech K98k (Karabiner 98) Rifle

As stated, maybe you have a scrubbed k98k with a Yugo k98k post war lower and an incorrect hand guard. I would think a Yugo butt plate should match a Yugo stock. Do the ding and dents and color match on the hand guard and lower; especially dents that fall over both pieces? Here is a video that shows a Yugo K98 with an M48. But there are some nice views of the sight and bands on the Yugo K98k;

Did the stock come with the hand guard as a set?
You got to ID the action. I am not sure but, Yugo K98 stocks were funny. While not sure, I think I remember that the Yugoslav rebuilt/ modified K98k stocks are 2/3" too short for the original German 98k.They were shortened to use the 23" new Serbian 1924 replacement barrels. ???? Some have German barrels others have new Yugo barrels- I got two Yugo capture K98ks that were rebarreled. The experts may be able to lead you in a correct direction.
The action has already been identified. It is a Czechoslovak VZ98N, the correct designation for the post WWII rifle made mostly from K98k parts.
 

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Geladen a few too many questions...
So would a Yugo K98k stock fit or be 2/3 of an inch too short if it is a full K98 action? He definitely has a 206 stamp on the stock lower. What would the barrel length be 23.23 like a VZ 24 or 23.62 on a K98k. Is a VZ 98N a version of a Tgf 1950 mauser lacking that winter large trigger guard?

I see a cleaning rod with the op rifle and the possible Yugo stock has a hole for a rod. What would be a correct stock for that rifle, an Israeli K98 post war Czech stock lacking the cleaning rod hole? Or I assume an RC stock if the OP wants a cleaning rod and it has no winter trigger guard assy. If an RC stock fits, then a real intact K98 stock should also work???? Comments, suggestions, errors in my reasoning.

Any references that have a great write up of the VZ98N rifles, the production and rifle types. Possible crests found on these rifles. Any On-line posts, web pages, or books you can suggest.
 

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Geladen a question...
So would a Yugo K98k stock fit or be 2/3 of an inch too short if it is a full K98 action? He definitely has a 206 stamp on the stock lower. What would the barrel length be 23.23 like a VZ 24 or 23.62 on a K98k. Is a VZ 98N a version of a Tgf 1950 mauser lacking that winter large trigger guard?

I see a cleaning rod with the op rifle and the possible Yugo stock has a hole for a rod. What would be a correct stock for that rifle, an Israeli K98 post war Czech stock lacking the cleaning rod hole?
The Yugo rebuilt K98k receiver would be standard length, the same as any German or Czech K98k.

The Yugo rebuilt K98K stock would be standard.

The Yugo M24 and M48 receivers and stocks would be intermediate length, about 1/4 inch shorter than a K98k.

The FN1924 is intermediate and the FN1930 is standard. The Yugo M24 is basically a clone of the FN1924 but with the enclosed cartridge head feature. The Yugo M48 is basically an M24 with a different (K98k style) stock and a bent bolt handle.

The correct stock for the subject VZ98N rifle would be a VZ98N stock, some of which rifles were sold to Israel, Ethiopia, and Pakastan. Israel rebuilt their various Mausers when they changed calibers from 7.92 to 7.62, rebarrelled the rifles, and mixed up all the parts including stocks. The current K98k replacement stock on the subject VZ98N rifle will accept a cleaning rod. K98k stocks will accept a cleaning rod except for the late war Kriegsmodell stocks.

The subject rifle was originally basically a Kriegsmodell K98k (lacking the Kriegsmodell stock) but the correct post war designation is VZ98N. The 'winter' triggerguard is the basic difference between the subject VZ98N rifle and the Kriegsmodell K98k, plus the VZ98N has a band spring, bayonet lug, and no screws in the barrel bands.

The Czech built German K98k was first, then the post WWII VZ98N was second, and the tgf 1950 was last. The Bolivian B50 came around the same time as the East German tgf 1950 - all standard. Only the VZ98N had the 'winter' trigger guard. The N in VZ98N stands for German, a reference to the predecessor K98k.

The first Czech Mauser was the VZ98 (same as German G98), then VZ98/22, then Iranian VZ98/29, then VZ23, then VZ24, then VZ33 plus various other export models - all standard.

An RC K98k stock is a K98k stock and should fit any K98k rifle.

For reference you can check the individual model listings (list in post #1) in the sticky Mausers, Only Mausers in the Military Mauser Forum; the VZ98N is on page 19, post 363. The book Mauser Military Rifles of the World, Fifth Edition has information on the VZ98N rifle under Israel and the B-50 rifle under Bolivia. The book Bolt Action Military Rifles of the World has one page of info on the VZ98N rifle on page 81. Or search Gunboards for a specific model. There are two or three videos on youtube about the Royal Tiger Ethiopian VZ98N import rifles.

The barrelled action of the subject rifle is a post WWII VZ98N. Stocks were robbed from VZ98N (cheaper rifles) by collectors to replace sporterized stocks on Kriegsmodell (late war) K98k (more valuable) rifles. Then the robbed VZ98N got whatever stock was available, often an RC K98k stock. For that reason, I think it would be very difficult to find an original VZ98N stock to put on this rifle. The stock that is now on it is similar to the original.

Most of the early VZ98N rifles used receivers with German markings, like dou or dot or swp 1945. Ethiopian rifles had an Ethiopian stock disk showing St. George killing the dragon. Rifles made for the Czech Army had the usual lion crest. When later sold to other countries, the lion crest was normally scrubbed but a few were sold with the crest remaining. East Germany had the tgf 1950 marking and a normal sized stamped trigger guard. Bolovian B50 rifles had the Bolivian national crest and a normal sized stamped trigger guard.
 

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I recently got an Ethiopian VZ98N rifle in amazingly good condition for an Ethiopian rifle. When cedar pollen season in over in central Texas around the middle of February, I will take it outside and get some good photos. For now there are plenty of photos in Mausers, Only Mausers of a plain VZ98N in post 363 on page 19.
 

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Outstanding, Thank You.
The VZ98N is in the Military Mauser Forum sticky Mausers, only Mausers on page 19, post 363. I have it listed under dou instead of ZB in the index on page 1, post 1 and I almost couldn't find it myself. The primary post 8 above is now edited to show that.
 

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About that Yugo stock , Here is some more info on people that got shorter stocks.



Apparently on some Yugo K98k stocks during a rebuild they cut the end of the stock off 2/3 of an inch and moved the bayonet lug and lower band back the same amount. A Yugo stock may require a short Yugoslav hand guard or you modify the one you have. It depended on what barrel was utilized during the rebuild an original german one or if they replaced the original barrel with a new yugo replacement. I have both; two Yugo K98K rebuilds; one with its German original barrel, and one with a new Yugo replacement barrel.
 

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It is known that some Yugo made K98k replacement stocks are about 1/2 inch shorter than German K98k stocks because they were made to go on rebuilt K98k rifles which have Yugo replacement barrels that are about 1/2 inch shorter than German K98k barrels. The issue is that the Yugo M48 bayonet with muzzle ring will not mount correctly on a combination of a standard overall length K98k stock and an about 1/2 inch shorter Yugo replacement barrel.

That issue would apply to the subject rifle if the stock were about 1/2 inch short because the correct bayonet for a VZ98N rifle is a post WWII marked VZ24 bayonet with muzzle ring (any VZ24 bayonet can be used). Simply mount a VZ24 or a Yugo M48 bayonet and see if the muzzle ring fits properly. If not, use a K98k bayonet without muzzle ring or a WWII German modified VZ24 bayonet with muzzle ring removed.

The mismatch of the stock rear band step and the handguard step on the subject rifle is not nearly on the order of magnitude of 1/2 inch and does not indicate that it is an about 1/2 inch short Yugo replacement K98k stock and handguard.

The subject rifle does appear to possibly have a Yugo replacement stock, but it also appears to be standard overall length. The mounting of a bayonet will tell.

1/3 or 2/3 of an inch are not valid measurements in the US (ex-English) linear measuring system.

Post WWII VZ24 bayonet on a VZ98N rifle
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WWII German modified VZ24 bayonet with muzzle ring removed
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Cody, if you want your rifle to look more original, you can look for some stamped bands and a stamped 'winter' triggerguard. It would be possible to modify your stock to accept a cupped buttplate, but I personally would not bother with that because you will never get around the issue of your rifle having the bolt disassembly disks. Also, leave the cleaning rod off as the VZ98N rifle stocks were not drilled for a cleaning rod.

It is the s/n suffix and the Czech lion firing proof on the receiver ring that identifies your rifle as a VZ98N.

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Discussion Starter #16
Cody, if you want your rifle to look more original, you can look for some stamped bands and a stamped 'winter' triggerguard. It would be possible to modify your stock to accept a cupped buttplate, but I personally would not bother with that because you will never get around the issue of your rifle having the bolt disassembly disks. Also, leave the cleaning rod off as the VZ98N rifle stocks were not drilled for a cleaning rod.

It is the s/n suffix and the Czech lion firing proof on the receiver ring that identifies your rifle as a VZ98N.
Wow lots of information! A bit overwhelming haha! Thank you though! I do appreciate it! I have heard a little about the VZ98N's but never could find really any information on them. Its good to know what I have now, as I was not completely sure! I don't know if you can see it (as the end of the stock blends in with the outdated carpet haha) but the stock is for sure cut for a cupped buttplate. its 'stepped down' where it would need to be to allow for a cupped plate. Also, I do still have the original stamped VZ98N trigger guard (that allows for gloved use). I had taken it off just for a more German look on the rifle. My understanding is, is that the cupped was a later-war iteration. Right? And thank you for the info on the stock. It makes sense to me as to why things don't fit haha! Here's a picture of the stock with a repro German bayonet on it-
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I think now I need to start looking for an actual original stock haha! And are those your rifles in all of your pictures? They're all beautiful!

Again, I really (I mean really) appreciate all your knowledge here! Like I've said, I couldn't find really any information besides the occasional text referring to the name "VZ98N".
 

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Discussion Starter #17
About that Yugo stock , Here is some more info on people that got shorter stocks.



Apparently on some Yugo K98k stocks during a rebuild they cut the end of the stock off 2/3 of an inch and moved the bayonet lug and lower band back the same amount. A Yugo stock may require a short Yugoslav hand guard or you modify the one you have. It depended on what barrel was utilized during the rebuild an original German one or if they replaced the original barrel with a new Yugo replacement. I have both; two Yugo K98K rebuilds; one with its German original barrel, and one with a new Yugo replacement barrel.
Thanks a bunch on identifying my 'new' stock as Yugo, and all the information about getting things to fit! I really appreciate it! Yeah the stock is definitely cut for a cupped buttplate. The cupped buttplate I have just doesn't fit good at all on it. I picked the stock up from a local gun show. The guy deals in mauser parts, but he kept identifying my gun as a VZ24, which I didn't think was correct, and turned out not to be. He kept trying to sell me a VZ24 stock which I dont believe would even fit, with the hand guard atleast. The majority of my stuff is pieced together I can tell. I do still have the original Czech handguard, I just had switched it out to make the rifle look more 'German'. Ill have to look for some Yugo cupped buttplates.
Again I really appreciate your reply!

also a picture of a repro German bayonet on the rifle for help identifying length-
3785813
 

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Wow lots of information! A bit overwhelming haha! Thank you though! I do appreciate it! I have heard a little about the VZ98N's but never could find really any information on them. Its good to know what I have now, as I was not completely sure! I don't know if you can see it (as the end of the stock blends in with the outdated carpet haha) but the stock is for sure cut for a cupped buttplate. its 'stepped down' where it would need to be to allow for a cupped plate. Also, I do still have the original stamped VZ98N trigger guard (that allows for gloved use). I had taken it off just for a more German look on the rifle. My understanding is, is that the cupped was a later-war iteration. Right? And thank you for the info on the stock. It makes sense to me as to why things don't fit haha! Here's a picture of the stock with a repro German bayonet on it-
View attachment 3785808
I think now I need to start looking for an actual original stock haha! And are those your rifles in all of your pictures? They're all beautiful!

Again, I really (I mean really) appreciate all your knowledge here! Like I've said, I couldn't find really any information besides the occasional text referring to the name "VZ98N".
That is good news that your stock is cut for the cupped buttplate which you already have AND THAT YOU HAVE THE CORRECT (UGLY) TRIGGER GUARD. You might be able to find a pair of stamped bands cheap on Ebay, Gunbroker, or Numrich.

The 'winter' triggerguard is Czech made. They had been receiving stamped triggerguards from German manufacturers before the war ended. Then, for whatever reason, they chose to make their own stamped triggerguards instead of resuming manufacture of their own milled triggerguards. I have heard that the 'winter' triggerguard was a Mauser design but never produced by Germany.

Your bayonet photo shows that your stock is full length. You should pick up a VZ24 bayonet for your rifle, they are not very expensive as bayonets go. Finding one with post WWII markings would be next to impossible, except - I recently bought one from Royal Tiger Imports along with my Ethiopian VZ98N rifle. I just checked their website and they still show to have six post WWII VZ24 bayonets priced at $79.99 each. Order one before the other collectors see this; the website operates 24/7.

All the photos I put in this thread are from my collection.


* BREAKING NEWS *
The Sierra auction on Proxibid tonight had an "UNKNOWN M1910 RIFLE" in the auction. I was able to ID it as a Serbian M1910 short rifle. Serbian M1910 long rifles and various Serbian carbines are rare enough, but this was a SHORT RIFLE. Mauser Military Rifles of the World, Fifth Edition shows a photo of a short rifle and says on page 319 that the one in the photo is the only one known "and this rifle may be unique". RIFLES of the WORLD 3RD EDITION mentions only the long rifles.

I am always on the lookout for deals and steals. This one was a STEAL. I got it for $325 + 17% auction fee + 3% credit card fee + shipping + $10 transfer fee.

The bad news is that the forearm of the stock is cut off about two inches in front of the rear band and the front band is missing. The good news is that I already have an empty Spanish M1893 long rifle stock and bands. The Spanish forearm, front band, and band spring are identical to the Serbian, aside from the forearm being longer. I'm thinking that the Spanish front end will look really good on the Serbian M1910 short rifle, spliced under the rear band. It does have the original unaltered handguard.

Never throw away any Mauser parts.

Now I'm looking for a correct Serbian bayonet . . .


Update: I just ordered a M1895 type Serbian bayonet & scabbard with C mark for Serbia on the spine from Otto at ebayonet.com for $55.00 + shipping. That seems like a really good price and the condition looks fine. I thought the Serbian M1899 bayonets were double edged but research showed that was only the Serbian bayonets made by Plumb during WWI (which are more expensive, like $200-$250).

That Sierra auction in AZ is a real pain and I can see why collectors don't look at it. I hate to go through it because it is always vast numbers of modern guns with never anything interesting. I did buy a used Rossi .38 revolver there once to give to a friend.

Perseverance pays off.

Original 1910 photo of what Mauser called Serbian M1910 Cavalry Carbine
325 were made; 2 are known in the US.
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Serbian bayonet I just ordered
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Thanks a bunch on identifying my 'new' stock as Yugo, and all the information about getting things to fit! I really appreciate it! Yeah the stock is definitely cut for a cupped buttplate. The cupped buttplate I have just doesn't fit good at all on it. I picked the stock up from a local gun show. The guy deals in mauser parts, but he kept identifying my gun as a VZ24, which I didn't think was correct, and turned out not to be. He kept trying to sell me a VZ24 stock which I dont believe would even fit, with the hand guard atleast. The majority of my stuff is pieced together I can tell. I do still have the original Czech handguard, I just had switched it out to make the rifle look more 'German'. Ill have to look for some Yugo cupped buttplates.
Again I really appreciate your reply!

also a picture of a repro German bayonet on the rifle for help identifying length-
View attachment 3785813
Your stock was on a Yugo rebuilt K98k rifle before it was on your rifle but it is as yet undetermined as to whether your stock was German made or Yugo made. The fact that your stock is not 1/2 inch short does not say that it could not be a full length Yugo made stock. Posting photos of your stock in the K98k Forum might get that question answered for you.

The 1/2 inch short stocks were used only on Yugo rebuilt K98k rifles which used the shorter Yugo replacement barrel. There probably also were full length Yugo stocks made for those rebuilt K98k rifles which kept the German barrel but needed a replacement stock.
 

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His stock in post #3 looks to be laminated wood and has a bolt takedown in the stock. To my knowledge, the Yugoslav made stocks had neither of those two features. Looking forward to photos of your Serbian M1910 Bill!
 
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