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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I wasn't sure where to post this so move it if it's in the wrong place. I found this 25-50mm Micrometer made by Mauser at a flea market in England this morning. It clearly shows the Mauser banner. Is there any collectors interest in these? Did Mauser make any other non-firearm items like this?
 

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Yes Mauser made other items than firearms and yes people do collect them. I think its neat and do pick things up when it doesnt interfere with longarms or ammo ; )
 

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they made non firearm related products between the end of WWI and Hitler coming to power in the 1930s. Due to the Versailles Treaty, firearm production was forbidden, so the Mauser had to find a way to keep the plant going. I could not find any info, but if memory serves me right, the even made automobiles and a sewing machines, too.
 

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About important german heavy industries dedicated to light industry there was an antique shop I went into selling a National-Krupp cash register made in germany in the 30's
 

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Firearm production was not forbidden in Germany during the interwar period; - it was regulated, primarily to restrict military production (of all types, not just weapons), whether for domestic, import or export.

Mauser made a lot of things in the interwar period, industrial sewing machines, precision measuring tools, and all sorts of other things. Some rather unexpected items were made by small arms makers- Simson for instance is probably best known in this period for its bicycle and baby stroller sales.. not as an arms maker (it made auto's and precision tools also).

This was typical of the firearm firms, most of the firms that survived this tough period delved into transportation like products, bicycles, motorbikes, and auto’s...
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the replies. I didn't realise that this micrometer was as old as being made in the 1919 - 1933 period. It doesn't have any kind of serial number so dating it could be a problem.
 

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Probably mid-1920's to mid-1930's is a better range, most firms were in a limbo, scrambling around for a new product line early after the war. Several things complicated the transition most firms took, - many had done similar things in Imperial period, bicycles especially- but you had great competition from the now "private" state arsenals and depots, which were really government owned (and supported) for the most part.

They got into all sorts of commercial products, and really made it hard for the little privately owned firms to survive. But the French would help… they and the Brits took a keen interest in DW, especially after they were found to be making sporting rifles.

Anyway, I have one very much like yours, mine with the original box and instruction sheet. I have owned quite a few of MO measuring devices, and they made several different types.. They are pretty neat!
 

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Your micrometer may not be that old. When I worked in in industry in the 1980s our firm bought a huge German made
Charmin (I think that's the spelling) CNC machining center. It was delivered with a box of tools and measuring equipment.
The measuring tools included a nice Mauser made set of calipers, a non-dial type that was around 12 inches or so measuring
capacity (metric, of course). They certainly looked new to me and I kind of wished I had tried to snag these when the place
closed down.
 

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True enough Mauser made measuring tools in the 1950's also, though I am not sure of the circumstances.

The instructions that came with mine has "Mauser-Werke AG. Oberndorf/Neckar" which is the name used in the early 1920's (and 1950's they used "Mauser-Werke AG"), so no help there. I am sure someone knows the differences though.

Hardly matters, as the tools they made, do not seem to have a great value. Rarely do they sell for much more than $100, often much less. (perhaps these are all common 1950's tools, still kind of cool)

Here is another tool, - I know of a dozen different types and I suspect there are a lot more.

Your micrometer may not be that old. When I worked in in industry in the 1980s our firm bought a huge German made
Charmin (I think that's the spelling) CNC machining center. It was delivered with a box of tools and measuring equipment.
The measuring tools included a nice Mauser made set of calipers, a non-dial type that was around 12 inches or so measuring
capacity (metric, of course). They certainly looked new to me and I kind of wished I had tried to snag these when the place
closed down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for all the replies. I took mine into work today and tested it on some slip gauges. It is still accurate. I only paid £3 for it from the flea market.
 
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