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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’ve owned the below Bolo Mauser Model 96 a long time! Consignment sale; no history. Over some decades, occasional forays to glean any information concerning its restoration ancestry. No results! Never believing it a one-off piece of work. More likely a firm using production line. Somewhere locked up in ‘senior recollection’ an ad for such as these in one or more national gun publications.

In the eighties, on scene at National Ordnance, El Monte, Ca., acquiring a regular Model 96. My pick of such guns, literally piled in several crates; @ $99. That another story, but wondering if, amidst all their shenanigans, they might have contracted such a bunch of these retreads. They featured a lot of such gun refurb work. Sort of "Mitchel'esque" work before that firm existed.

This particular Bolo, SN 483xxx, early model production, placing in early twenties. Many Bolos of that era, Mauser firm sales directly to the Bolshevik government; hotly pending morphing to USSR. The gun presented here, quality restoration with clean/functional lockwork. Excepting dark bore, the overall impression, pretty nice.

And... that about the extent of my info. Any related info/observations/speculation, etc., appreciated!
Thanks!
iskra
 

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It is a post WWI Bolo, which is a very common variation. Most were rode hard and put away wet and show that wear today. I agree that it has been restored but it is one of the better restorations I have seen. So now value, again IMHO value is at the high end for a restoration because of the quality of the work and I think a fair auction estimate would be $1000-1200. It could sell for much more if chased by some novice collectors that did not recognize that it has been restored.

Regards,
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Gentlemen, a belated thanks for the responses/information. No desire to sell it. But Kyrie's response supporting my belief that it was quite likely a National Ordnance or Federal Ordinance (recollection confused nowadays) restoration.
For some reason, the email notice of response I depend on in these posts, failed me. Only happened to note these as preparing to 'opinionate' on a recent C96 Thread.
Again thanks!
iskra
 

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Fed Ord sold a lot of Broomhandles and Bolos, plus the American Eagle 98 Mausers and others. I had one of the Bolos that sold for $129.99, and it was a boat anchor. I did find a use for the bolt, after I broke one in a Broom by firing hot ammo in it. The one in the OP is the nicest Bolo I've seen outside the one in the Blue Book.
 

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Someone who challenged asked me once to show him a single photo of a C96 ruined by hot (Czech Tokarev) ammo. After an hour of Google image search I had found only one. :(

The problem is most of the failures happened before the days of digital cameras and the Internet.
 

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I do not dispute it. I merely state hardly anyone ever posted photos online a decade later. :) It was probably 1952 CZ submachine gun ammo. That stuff blew up Tokarevs too as it was loaded to about 150% of Tokareve pressures. Intended for the CZ subgun and with a steel armor piercing core it was imported right around the time of the Chinese C96 flood and sold via Shotgun News as suitable for all those C96 pistols. LoL, Nope.
 

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Yes, it was back in that era. It taught me a lesson that I remember every time somebody claims that 7.62 Tokarev ammo and 7.63 Mauser are loaded identically. I also bought a lot of Czech 9mm that had a steel core and came on 8-rd strippers.
 

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Well actually I believe for the most part they are loaded identically as velocity testing of some imports shows similar velocities. A better question is whose Tokarev ammo, and which lot?

Pictured here is the Czech submachine gun round which absolutely MUST be avoided by C96 shooters. Note the headstamp. The number can be either 52 (as in 1952) or 53 (as in 1953). As the magnet hints this is steel cored ammo (intended to be somewhat armor piercing). A well known gunsmith (who should have known better) recently sold me a whole bunch of DWM stripper clips and DWM C96 ammo & Soviet Tokarev ammo. As you can see there was some other stuff mixed in with it, including the gun buster round (4th from the right).


Czechoslovakia also developed a specific pistol to work with the new submachine gun and it's hot ammo. However, since the ammo was so overloaded it even burst the pistols (52s) designed to work with it. ( 4 pics found on the net). So for 1954 the charge was reduced to more modest levels and the hot ammo went into a warehouse where it sat for 30 years till suddenly there was a market opportunity to dump it.

Here are 3 pictures of a trashed C96 bolt caused by the same ammo.
 

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