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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I picked up a "project" 1887 Amberg Mauser 71/84 from an estate sale for a song. It was missing a few parts that I was able to find on Numrich fortunately. One of the missing components was the barrel band spring (pictured below) and its associated brass screw (not available). The barrel band spring is screwed into the thin stock by a very small brass screw (about 3-4 threads in total), and given the curvature of the leaf spring, it is under a lot of pressure from spring tension when the barrel band is set in place. The wood stock that it sits in is quite thin due to the fact that with the 71/84, the magazine tube sits immediately below the barrel in the stock, which doesn't allow for a thick area of wood to screw into.

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I picked up a few wood screws that would do the trick. I was able to find one that matches the profile of the beveled edge of the band spring, and had enough threads to engage the wood stock, without being too aggressive and drilling out chips wood as it is screwed in. After it was screwed it with the spring free of tension, I carefully applied pressure to the spring and set the barrel band in place, it held....for about 2.5 seconds before the screw was ripped out and flung across the room from the released spring tension. This likely also chewed up any bits of wood in the scew channel that the screw threads clung to.

Any further attempts would likely be beyond my level of comfort. Likely the gunsmithing cost would be more than double what I paid for the rifle. Do you guys agree that the best course of action to enjoy the rifle as-is? I haven't used Acraglas before, but I am wondering if Acraglas + more aggressively threaded screw might work after it is cured.
 

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What I have done before, usually on torn-up butt plate screw holes, is use Marine-Tex epoxy. Other similar epoxies should work well too. Remove the barreled action from the stock, carefully degrease the wood around the hole, then cover the screw and spring in releasing agent. Don't skimp, if you leave that out forget removing the screw. Then add some epoxy, and lightly clamp the screw and spring into place. Once it cures you should have good solid threads matched to the screw.
 

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I picked up a "project" 1887 Amberg Mauser 71/84 from an estate sale for a song. It was missing a few parts that I was able to find on Numrich fortunately. One of the missing components was the barrel band spring (pictured below) and its associated brass screw (not available). The barrel band spring is screwed into the thin stock by a very small brass screw (about 3-4 threads in total), and given the curvature of the leaf spring, it is under a lot of pressure from spring tension when the barrel band is set in place. The wood stock that it sits in is quite thin due to the fact that with the 71/84, the magazine tube sits immediately below the barrel in the stock, which doesn't allow for a thick area of wood to screw into.

View attachment 3767318

I picked up a few wood screws that would do the trick. I was able to find one that matches the profile of the beveled edge of the band spring, and had enough threads to engage the wood stock, without being too aggressive and drilling out chips wood as it is screwed in. After it was screwed it with the spring free of tension, I carefully applied pressure to the spring and set the barrel band in place, it held....for about 2.5 seconds before the screw was ripped out and flung across the room from the released spring tension. This likely also chewed up any bits of wood in the scew channel that the screw threads clung to.

Any further attempts would likely be beyond my level of comfort. Likely the gunsmithing cost would be more than double what I paid for the rifle. Do you guys agree that the best course of action to enjoy the rifle as-is? I haven't used Acraglas before, but I am wondering if Acraglas + more aggressively threaded screw might work after it is cured.
I hope yours has the complete bolt with it. I got a modified rifle some years ago and spent a lot of time locating the missing parts. WillSarchet has a good idea about the epoxy in the hole and the release agent. I had exactly the same problem with that barrel band retainer since mine was not the original and didn't fit my barrel band perfectly. I got that spring piece from Numrich arms also and had to relieve some of the spring pressure and do some file work on the retainer to allow that pin to fit correctly. Does the pin come up to the surface of the barrel band when you press the screw area into the stock by hand? If it does and the amount of pressure needed to push that screw area is not very much you are in luck and WillSarchet's idea should work perfect. Be careful removing the action from the stock because the barrel band at the muzzle end of the stock has a small screw (on the left side) that holds a slide-through band in place that must be removed to allow that barrel band to come off but check the integrity of the tube first. The most important thing is the magazine tube travels through the stock and fits into the lower part of the receiver and can be damaged if not moved out of the way. The magazine cap will need to be unscrewed to allow the spring and the Magazine follower to be removed and then the magazine tube can be pulled out an inch or two to clear the receiver BUT BEFORE trying to pull the magazine tube out check the inside of the magazine tube with a flashlight to be sure it isn't rusted out. A lot of them were rusted and kind of came apart or would not budge when trying to remove the tube. If you feel you don't want to remove the action you could just move that barrel ring forward, do a modified version of WillSarchet's epoxy idea and be done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I hope yours has the complete bolt with it. I got a modified rifle some years ago and spent a lot of time locating the missing parts. WillSarchet has a good idea about the epoxy in the hole and the release agent. I had exactly the same problem with that barrel band retainer since mine was not the original and didn't fit my barrel band perfectly. I got that spring piece from Numrich arms also and had to relieve some of the spring pressure and do some file work on the retainer to allow that pin to fit correctly. Does the pin come up to the surface of the barrel band when you press the screw area into the stock by hand? If it does and the amount of pressure needed to push that screw area is not very much you are in luck and WillSarchet's idea should work perfect. Be careful removing the action from the stock because the barrel band at the muzzle end of the stock has a small screw (on the left side) that holds a slide-through band in place that must be removed to allow that barrel band to come off but check the integrity of the tube first. The most important thing is the magazine tube travels through the stock and fits into the lower part of the receiver and can be damaged if not moved out of the way. The magazine cap will need to be unscrewed to allow the spring and the Magazine follower to be removed and then the magazine tube can be pulled out an inch or two to clear the receiver BUT BEFORE trying to pull the magazine tube out check the inside of the magazine tube with a flashlight to be sure it isn't rusted out. A lot of them were rusted and kind of came apart or would not budge when trying to remove the tube. If you feel you don't want to remove the action you could just move that barrel ring forward, do a modified version of WillSarchet's epoxy idea and be done.
Thanks for the insight.

Yes my bolt is complete. I watched a disassembly video by TheKoba49 and all parts were present, and the firing pin was intact. I should have mentioned that I have already taken apart the rifle for cleaning (other than the complicated lifter feeding system). I was missing the stacking hook end-cap, magazine tube spring, and magazine follower. I was able to get the cap and a reproduction spring from Numrich. I fabricated a "Bubba" follower out of a carriage bolt and a nylon spacer. It is not original, but feeds 11mm Mauser dummy rounds into the chamber flawlessly.

The barrel band spring replacement I got was from Numrich. It has a SIGNIFICANT bend to it and when I press down on the retaining screw hole of the spring to make it flush with the stock, the part of the spring (with the pin that locks into the barrel band hole) lifts out of the stock by quite a bit. As a result, if I try to depress the spring on both ends against the stock (as it would be if it was correctly installed), there is a LOT of spring pressure against my fingers. I will follow up with a photo soon. In this configuration, that small brass screw is under a LOT of pressure and it makes sense that it was ripped out under load. It seems silly that there is so much spring tension require just to keep a barrel band in place. Can you elaborate on what you did to relieve some of the "excess" spring pressure? What exactly did you do to the spring?
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Thanks for the insight.

Yes my bolt is complete. I watched a disassembly video by TheKoba49 and all parts were present, and the firing pin was intact. I should have mentioned that I have already taken apart the rifle for cleaning (other than the complicated lifter feeding system). I was missing the stacking hook end-cap, magazine tube spring, and magazine follower. I was able to get the cap and a reproduction spring from Numrich. I fabricated a "Bubba" follower out of a carriage bolt and a nylon spacer. It is not original, but feeds 11mm Mauser dummy rounds into the chamber flawlessly.

The barrel band spring replacement I got was from Numrich. It has a SIGNIFICANT bend to it and when I press down on the retaining screw hole of the spring to make it flush with the stock, the part of the spring (with the pin that locks into the barrel band hole) lifts out of the stock by quite a bit. As a result, if I try to depress the spring on both ends against the stock (as it would be if it was correctly installed), there is a LOT of spring pressure against my fingers. I will follow up with a photo soon. In this configuration, that small brass screw is under a LOT of pressure and it makes sense that it was ripped out under load. It seems silly that there is so much spring tension require just to keep a barrel band in place. Can you elaborate on what you did to relieve some of the "excess" spring pressure? What exactly did you do to the spring? View attachment 3768092

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I'll be honest, it was some time ago but I may have applied heat but I can imagine myself taking a pair of pliers and holding the unit just past the screw hole area and trying to bend it down so it was about half that curve. The biggest problem for me, besides too strong a spring, was if I took the spring unit and tried to fit it so the pin went all the way up in the hole on the barrel band that bump area would bind on the barrel band body and not allow the pin to fit all the way. Right now I can press the bump area with light pressure and the pin drops down and pops right back up when I remove finger pressure.
 

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That's quite a bit of tension. You may have to reshape the spring first. You'll need to anneal it, reform it, harden and temper it again to get it to both take the new shape without breaking it and also go back to acting as a spring. If you haven't made a flat spring before I recommend getting some spring stock and practicing on that, because if you mess up you can snap it pretty easily.
 

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Hmm, I did several 71/84 up, never saw that problem, I think a steel slotted screw is correct, rather than brass.
Funny you should say that about the brass screw -- I didn't like the idea of the brass screw in my rifle either but it was all I had available at the time. I thought about replacing later but I never got around to it. My rifle is definitely not a correct rifle and few numbers match and due to poor eyesight has one of those long eye relief scopes (7 power) on it but it shoots great and works great in brush or field. It was a butchered piece of junk when I found it and took forever to get it to shooting condition but that's all.

Nothing collector grade about this rifle but it's darn fun to shoot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Conclusion:

I took some pliers and a lot of heat to the spring and slowly worked it so that there was less of a curve to the spring, but enough to still engage the barrel band hole and keep it in place. I worked it carefully for fear of making the spring brittle and snapping it. The spring did experience a bit of discoloration in the process, but it was shaped appropriately. I used a steel wood screw I filed down to an appropriate length and it worked like a charm. Unfortunately it is a Phillips screwhead and not a more correct looking slotted screw.
 

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Conclusion:

I took some pliers and a lot of heat to the spring and slowly worked it so that there was less of a curve to the spring, but enough to still engage the barrel band hole and keep it in place. I worked it carefully for fear of making the spring brittle and snapping it. The spring did experience a bit of discoloration in the process, but it was shaped appropriately. I used a steel wood screw I filed down to an appropriate length and it worked like a charm. Unfortunately it is a Phillips screwhead and not a more correct looking slotted screw.
The Phillips screw head was all I had and in brass but you can see my rifle is not a collector piece and mine worked also. The only thing I can suggest is go to a hardware store now If you know the screw head size and length and try to match it. Hopefully you can find it and with a black finish. I'm glad that Numrich part fit your barrel band where the pin comes up through the hole and the raised part you push on was not catching on the band -- mine was a pain.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I realize I never really concluded this post. I ended up finding a good slotted brass screw at a small mom & pop hardware store (aren't they the best?). I filled in the gouged out screw hole with a toothpick, sawdust, and wood glue and let it sit overnight. I drilled a super small pilot hole and screwed in the brass screw. It held the spring under tension very tight and I was able to slip on the barrel band, which is now firmly locked into place!
 
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