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Matching numbers means as it left the factory.

My Mauser 98 has matching numbers on the bolt and receiver, but not on the floorplate or barrel band. Can this be considered as a matching number rifle?
Depending on factory/model/time period, there was a convention to the numbering and a collecter bidding on a "matching numbered" rifle is going to be upset if that convention is not met in any detail. It is very common to see Mausers with mismatched bolts for example and this has a definate effect on price but there is also an issue with the stock or bands being mis-matched. Many rifles were converted to minimal sporters in the 1950's and 1960's and these are often seen now back in military trim. They can be "period correct", but there are still issues if the stock is a repacement, etc. It doesn't mean they will not find collector interest, and a buyer, but it does affect value. There are armorers' rebuilds as well ( e.g. a floorplate with the original number crossed off and a new number stamped on it on a GEW 98) but generally anything done to the weapon after it left military issue will be a point of concern and lower value. Having said that, a period correct refit will be worth more than the economy sporter for sure, if it is sold for what it is.
 

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My Mauser 98 has matching numbers on the bolt and receiver, but not on the floorplate or barrel band. Can this be considered as a matching number rifle?
Sorry, close only counts in horseshoes. All that can be said is, "All matching, EXCEPT floorplate and band"....

Less serious than a bolt or stock for sure. Depending on exact model, it might not make that much difference in value? But Matching= Matching.....
 

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If any numbers don't match it's not "matching", and by "numbers" I mean original factory applied at the time of ORIGINAL manufacture. NOT re-stamps or numbers later applied using a elecrto-pencil to "force" match any numbers.

Kind of like a virgin.....She's only a virgin before the first time. anything after that cannot be considered "the first time".
 

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Your "Mauser 98" could be one of many different models made in different countries. It just means a type of action similar in design to the German Gewehr 98. Some of these models had the floorplate and trigger guard originally numbered and some did not. We need to know what model rifle you have in order to answer your question.

If your rifle has no numbers on those parts it might be "matching numbers", depending on the model. If it has different numbers, it is not.

A rifle said to have "matching numbers" is expected to have all the parts which originally were marked with numbers to have the same numbers, as originally marked.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks, that's really what I expected. The barrel band is 20 numbers off from the bolt/receiver, which maybe could have been a field repair, but the floorplate is way off. It's marked S/42 1937 on the receiver.
 

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Here is what happens when a seller claims "matching numbers" on a Kar 88 and they are not ALL matching:

Gunbroker seller eden892
F
feedback

Description said "with matching numbers". Gun had multiple mismatched numbers. He offered to accept return with me paying shipping both ways. I don't trust him to have both my gun and my money.
Response: (left on 11/19/2010) Bolt body,receiver,barrel,stock,triggerguard, barrel sleeve,front barrel band all match.He wants a $100.00 refund instead of asking to return rifle.I offered refund on the 1890 rifle he refused.
Follow Up: (left on 11/20/2010) "With matching numbers" means exactly that. It does not mean with mostly matching numbers. The gun was mismatched and the mismatched numbers were visible without disassembly. He lied about the gun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
OK. I took the rifle into a gun shop in Ft Worth to enquire about selling it on consignment and they, after taking it in to a back room for about 30 minutes, came back with a value of $195, stating that it was a "West German gun" (whatever that means) and non matching numbers, hence the low price. They further informed me not to become angry if they advertise it on the internet at a much higher price because of very high internet fees. I didn't know whether to believe them about the non matching number part, but I guess they were right about that. I had asked about the eagle stamp and was told that the eagle and swastika was last seen on a Colt .45 manufactured by the Singer sewing machine company. I decided to depart on that note and just keep the rifle.
 
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