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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm trying to identify some markings found on the receiver ring and wrist of a 1943 Savage No.4 Mk I*. The mark is somewhat similar to the 5-pointed star-with-a-squiggle (see #1, below) identified in Hoffman & Schott's "Handbook of Military Rifle Marks 1866-1950", pg.33), as INDONESIA - but it's not the same - it's an "M" within a five-pointed star.
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Any information you might have would be greatly appreciated. Extra marks if you can point to books, documents, websites or other sources of information.

Enfield-Stuff
 

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From the other forum, this has been identified as the ROF Woolwich Out Inspection stamp. A "W" within the star. I have a maltby No4 with the same stamp, but it looks like a pentagram with the W inside (when viewed upside down). When I get home from work, I'll try and pull a rifle out of the gunsafe and get you a pic.
In the meantime, here is an example of what (i think) you're referring to. Not my rifle.
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milprileb- yes, weedon repair marking. Thanks for the correction. They also have a six-point start over a V, also indicating the repairs to the Weedon Repair Standard (WRS).
 

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milprileb- yes, weedon repair marking. Thanks for the correction. They also have a six-point start over a V, also indicating the repairs to the Weedon Repair Standard (WRS).
There were many star-letter WRS contract codes. Each letter representing a different contractor. For instance, your V signifies Greener. Those codes in one form or another are typically found beneath the wrist on about half the P14 rifles.

What we are dealing with here is a bit different. Type of mark and its placement matter. Visually similar but different meaning. Similar to *. Same mark but whether it's on the Nock's form or buttsocket tells a different story.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
From the other forum, this has been identified as the ROF Woolwich Out Inspection stamp. A "W" within the star. I have a maltby No4 with the same stamp, but it looks like a pentagram with the W inside (when viewed upside down).get
Thank you for your note and pics. I've heard from several folks that if I simply turned the star upside down, the mark would be revealed as some sort of Weeden code. Similarly, if I hold a mirror up to my wife's SUBARU, the code U-R-A-BUS would be revealed, indicating that the vehicle had been assembled in Frostbite Falls, Minnesota. Occam's Razor: the simplest explanation usually prevails. It's a five-pointed star; the pointy end goes up, yes? Why would any 1920-1930-1940-1950 Royal Arsenal turn it upside down and then insert a letter code? The simplest explanation is that it's a "M" - not a "W".

Having said that, I'll cheerfully admit that I could be wrong. Happens quite frequently. (Ask my wife.)

The problem is that 50-70-100 years after the fact, there isn't enough documentation, notes, papers or source materials to answer the thousand-and-one questions that collectors fuss about today.

I'm a documents-kind-of-guy. If anyone has any suggestions about books, sources or other materials where I can find Weedon codes, I'd be grateful. (I have seen a "W" inset within a crown, but that's a different animal.)

BTW: my comments (above) were not intended to be snarky - merely humorous. I AM grateful for the help and suggestions. Every day I discover there are more things I don't know. (Again, ask my wife.)

Enfield-Stuff
 

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On my No4Mk1* Long Branch the Star with a clear "W" inside it is stamped along the rifles bore axis. Its showing its a W and not a M. Now , I don't know what work shop or facility stamped Star with a "M" inside it nor what work they did. I have read Weeden did repairs on rifles and used the Star with W stamp which they whacked on receiver ring.

On my rifle, the entire metal is suncorite painted, a new barrel was installed and new fore arm wood fitted. It was not modified as a 1/2 or 1/3 but remains a No4Mk1*. Long Branch is not crossed out on the receiver bridge. The rifle was rebuilt but never marked FTR, only got the Star with W mark on receiver ring.

Side note: We all know Long Branch never suncorite painted 1943 No4Mk1* rifles in WWII or post WWII. This 43 Long Branch got painted and repaired by the British post WWII. The only mark on the rifle is this Star mark on the receiver denoting it was repaired / refurbished to an extent .

Of course I can hold rifle upside down and its a M in the star. Okay whatever , its a W or its a M but whatever facility did the work, the rifle was superbly repaired to new condition and its my 1000 yard No.4 shooter. I love it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you for your note and thoughtful response. Can I get you to post a clean and pretty pic of the star-W mark, please? This way anyone reading this thread will be able to see the difference between a star-M and a star-W and we'll have fewer suggestions about turning the mark (any mark, really), this way or that and viewing only under the light of a full moon, etc.

Enfield-Stuff
 

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My half pennies worth.
Generally the letter M is made with the two outer edge straights in the vertical plane whereas the letter W the two outer edge straights are usually at an angle. I said generally because there will be numerous exceptions to this rule.

If this be the case the picture posted by Enfield-Stuff would appear to be the letter M in a star whilst the picture posted by smle addict would appear to show the letter W in a star.

Font depending but the letter W is less likely to have the small horizontal markings where the two uprights merge.

As for the star orientation, no idea, however all pictures I've seen of a hollow five pointed star show them with two points at the base. Now this all adds up to floundering in murky waters with no clear answer in sight.
 

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Wouldn't the orientation make the example #2, a splayed M, inline with the 'top' star ray. The other way round makes the orientation of the W pointing to the 'crotch' of the star.
 

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So I dug out one of my No4's from the gunsafe. And here it is. When the rifle is upright (as it would be in a storage rack), one can clearly see the five pointed, upside down star (or pentagram) with the W inside. Under the wrist, there is also the pentagram with W inside. Rifle is a 1943 Maltby FTR'd in 1948
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Thanks for posting the pictures, helps clarify. It seems that there are two distinct markings out there:
1. A letter M with vertical sides in a hollow star with a point upwards and
2. A letter W with the angled verticals, if that makes sense, inside a pentagram.

Now if only we knew what they signified?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thank you, MILPRELIB and SMLE ADDICT, for your photos and comments. Thank you, BOMBER, for your succinct summary. Nicely done. Thank you, one and all, for your notes and comments.

Enfield-Stuff
 
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