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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an otherwise nice M95 Steyr in 8x56R built 1917 Wein matching numbers- fired one shot and it would not eject Hornady ammo- had to pound shell out with steel tubing from muzzle end

measured spent brass- middle is larger OD than base- so brass balloons in chamber jamming the gun

middle of brass is .504" after being fired

base of brass is only .494" after being fired

after removing the shell, I cannot reinsert it back in chamber- there is a ring of material at chamber entrance that is smaller than the OD of spent shell

If I run a .504" reamer right through the chamber so I can reinsert the spent shell, this gun "should" then fire and eject- I would test fire it at a distance using long piece of string- many shots- to be sure it's then safe

what says you ? any/all opinions welcome

the only other solution is send it to a specialty 'smith, they remove barrel, cut it, set it back, and rechamber it again. PROBLEM- the bolt face is specifically machined for the 8x56R cartridge with .554" diameter rim- any other chambering would not share that rim size, so the bolt would not work. Closest I can find is 303 Brit with a .540" rim

I'm also considering wildcatting it into a 444 x 56R and making something similar to a 44 Marlin with a rimmed case, but with a new custom barrel cut from a blank to match original profile and contour, so it fits in the stock

question #2, does anyone make aftermarket stocks for these guns to sporterize them ?

no, I don't want to make a wallhanger out of it or part it out- yet- I kind of like that 8x56R cartridge and action
 

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Don't know anyone making a replacement stock for the 1895.

The easiest solution is to get a better specimen. I wouldn't go hogging out the chamber, and to pay a smith to pull the barrel and set it back is throwing good money after bad into that rifle.
 

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You really can't use a fired case as a gauge.

A fired rifle cartridge case often will not rechamber easily in the rifle in which it was fired. Also, cartridge case walls taper in thickness and are thickest near the case head, thus less liable to swell at that point.

Before you conclude that the chamber is "bulged", make a chamber cast with
Cerrosafe and measure the casting to get an accurate reading. The hard extraction might just be caused by a rough or fouled chamber.

M
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
the chamber is clean, I wire brushed it- I can actually see a ring of shiny metal at entrance to chamber when looking in with a flashlight, that is a smaller diameter than the rest of the chamber ahead of it. The barrel, rifling, and chamber are otherwise in good condition and not corroded, actually in better shape than my Mauser K98 that needed rechambering/reboring to .358" to clean up.

I talked to the 'smith that did my Mauser, he believes it can be repaired by removing barrel, cutting it off slightly at the threads, rechambering it for 8x56R again, and setting it back in the receiver. It will end up being on the high side for cartridge-to-chamber fit, but it should then eject with no problem, with that ring of material removed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Don't know anyone making a replacement stock for the 1895.

The easiest solution is to get a better specimen. I wouldn't go hogging out the chamber, and to pay a smith to pull the barrel and set it back is throwing good money after bad into that rifle.

thanks for reply- I prefer to repair a gun rather than purchase another one, this barrel/receiver are matching numbers and otherwise in very good condition- there's a 'smith out in Arizona that's quite good at this www.cutrifle.com He did a K98 for me and saved the original German barrel w/waffenstamps- by setting back/rechambering/reboring to .358x57- when everyone else said use the barrel for a tomato stake in the garden. It shoots like a tackdriver now. The cost was $275 but for that kind of accuracy it's worth it.

I was just wondering if anyone else had this type of problem with the Steyr M95, and if it's common at all- one thing I noticed, there is not a lot of material around the chamber area of this barrel to rechamber to larger rounds- and there's also less barrel thickness for reboring to larger calibers- less than the Mauser K98 that's for sure.
 

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IMHO I would just buy a new M95. Spend the $100 to buy a nice new one to shoot in stead of spending $275 (or what ever) to pay a gunsmith. Then you have saved $175 to send another project to the smith or get another rifle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
I have the entire gun apart, soaked barrel for a few hours and brushed it out- the rifling is in very good condition, no throat erosion- the chamber has some very slight pitting and one tiny burr where extractor would be located when bolt is closed- but enough that it put a small groove in the brass when I pounded the spent shell out with a rod

it may be quite an easy fix for my local machine shop- simply removing this barrel and carefully running a boring tool inside the chamber, will remove the small burr and any metal material stopping the spent shell from ejecting.

spent brass is actually very good indicator of chamber size- when RCBS makes custom dies for match shooting, they ask for a spent brass to size the dies to- this way the dies can be made to closely resize the brass to the actual chamber size and shape

shooting for top accuracy, the key is only neck resize and don't full length resize anyway- the spent brass when cleaned, should reinsert into the chamber after a neck resizing

one problem with the Steyr M95 is the camming action for chambering relies totally upon the spring strength in the bolt- which is why these Steyr guns have such generous chamber sizes, actually on the sloppy side, it makes chambering a round easier- unlike a Mauser where the bolt can be cranked down and a dirty/slightly offsize round can be chambered using the strength of the shooter and the bolt's camming action

I've been doing this a long time now for over 30 years, this is the first gun I ran into that would not accept the spent brass after removing it. I'm 99% sure it's a slightly swollen chamber, and that burr preventing the gun from ejecting properly- and I believe someone fired it before I purchased it, with the barrel partially plugged with cosmoline.

the center section of spent brass is .504" but the bottom is only .494"- yet I can take the chuck end of a 1/2" drill bit and flop it into the chamber with a few turns of my fingers. This only needs a very slight cleanup cut of a few thousandths and polishing in the chamber, and the brass will feed with no jamming- I'm going to proceed and report back my findings

thanks for your replies

ps- there's a lot of carbine barrels for sale, but no rifle barrels for Steyr M95- the rifle barrels are in demand
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
today I polished the chamber of this Steyr M95 with barrel still on the receiver, using a proprietary home-made honing/polishing arbor- now the fired brass will chamber easily and snugly, by pushing it in with my fingertips. That was a lifesaver because I didn't want to remove that barrel, unless I really had to. I don't have an action wrench for this gun, or barrel vise/jaws, so I'd have to cobble up something, if I had to remove the barrel. The rifling and chamber are in very good condition overall for a gun that's 92 years old.

I disassembled the bolt, and found the firing pin spring was broken into 5 pieces, one long piece with 4 smaller pieces that had somehow threaded themselves into ends of the largest piece. The firing pin still worked anyway, so I disassembled the bolt completely, scrubbed it with a toothbrush and Mr. Clean and hot water in the sink, then let it dry thoroughly on my coal stove top. (no more lacquer thinner or solvents for me, after 25 years I'm sensitived to that stuff) Then greased and reassembled the bolt, and now it works quite easily, and doesn't stick or jam at all. I then lightly greased the action receiver bolt rails and the outside of bolt with a light film of synthetic wheel bearing grease, worked the action, wiped off the excess grease- and what a big difference, the gun cycles much smoother than before.

Testing, it now extracts the spent brass from the chamber, but didn't eject it, the brass stayed attached to the bolt- checked and found out the ejector tip is broken off. So I ordered a new ejector assembly today for $15 delivered price.

it will be interesting to see how this Steyr M95 shoots, and hopefully I can finally get to use the new reloading dies I bought many years ago.
can't wait to finally see how this gun prints at the 100 yd. range- hopefully I saved an expensive trip to the gunsmith- we'll see
 

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I'm glad to hear you may have gotten to the bottom of the issues with carbine. Let us know how it performs once you get the new parts installed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
the new ejector part arrived today by US Mail-installed it 5 minutes ago- put spent shell in chamber, closed bolt- now it really flings the empty brass

hopefully it will extract/eject when I test fire it- tomorrow is the moment of truth- no deer hunting allowed on Sundays here by law, so I can go out and hum a few bars of 8x56R on the M95
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
update- upon firing the gun, the brass once again stuck in the chamber

the gun is at a custom gunsmith, we are going to try a rechambering/reaming to our own wildcat "improved" 8x56R

the gunsmith looked at it closely and believes it was reamed badly by the original factory, due to a wobbly reamer, back in the 1930's

if that doesn't work, plan "B" is rechamber/rebore to .348 Winchester, to clean up entire chamber and new bore. The 348 brass rim will have to be turned down to fit the 8x56R bolt face, and to feed through the en bloc clip.

so the story continues...

ps- it's a rifle, not a carbine- which is why I'm trying to salvage it- not many rifles around anymore, not as many as carbines
 
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