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Picked up a couple of M60 barrel assemblies recently. I intend to resale these at one point. Looking for information on value. One barrel I SA 6/60 marked with an excellent bore. Second barrel is dated 4/66 but from a different manufacturer. Also an excellent bore. Any idea on value ? Let me know.
3809792
Wood Font Gas Art Wind instrument
 

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Picked up a couple of M60 barrel assemblies recently. I intend to resale these at one point. Looking for information on value. One barrel I SA 6/60 marked with an excellent bore. Second barrel is dated 4/66 but from a different manufacturer. Also an excellent bore. Any idea on value ? Let me know. View attachment 3809792 View attachment 3809792
If you’re trying to sell them as functional M60 Spare Barrels you’ll have to provide more information. While the bores may look good more information is needed about the chambers and the throat area in the Stellite liner. If you look at the barrel you will see a silver colored ring, from the ring back to the locking collar is the liner. The barrel is actually two parts, the liner area contains the chamber and then you have the rifled barrel.

The barrel assembly is gauged in the throat area of the liner and the locking lug assembly. If either one of the two points fails the gauge test the barrels are DX’d (discontinued from use) and disposed of. Throat erosion is the biggest factor because if it is beyond a certain measurement the barrel is prone to case separation during firing. Case separation that occurs during firing results in a portion of the casing remaining in the chamber and the next round being jammed into it. This obviously disables the gun and the barrel.

The second issue is the dates of the barrels, 1966. Think Vietnam and helicopters, hundreds of thousands of M60 barrels were DX’d and returned for salvage. Most times the barrels were returned to a Depot site and sold at auction as scrap.

I worked with Army National Guard units in a number of states setting up training programs. Many of the programs were for crew served weapons such as the M60. When we went to a range with the M60’s we made the unit bring out every gun and spare barrel assembly they had.

By the timewe finished a weekend’s training we had about half the barrel assemblies red tagged and returned to a depot for gauging and evaluation. On average, any barrel from the Vietnam time frame was replaced with new manufactured barrels.

So, if you plan to sell them as serviceable and want to get the value for a serviceable barrel then you need more information in your advertising.
If you sell them as novelty items and unserviceable, start your bidding at $1.00 and hope for the best.

If you can get your hands on some M2 Tripods, pintles, traversing mechanisms or the parts of the gun(bolts, oprods, springs, pistons, etc.) you’ll get a much better return on your investment. I sold stripped bolts for $200.00+, complete bolts for over $450.
There is a market for M60 parts, just be careful selling defective parts as serviceable, it can come back to bite you.
 

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in addition to the above^^^

GB completed auctions show a NIB stripped sold for $610

if you have a way to measure the headspace etc, , I can tell you those numbers will be asked over and over again, (sold some years ago,)


you will get questions on the condition of the gas cyl's and pistons too, but since they are old school safety wired, just be sure to mention that to the buyers,

and a pic and post in the NFA section will get you more info
 
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